Xavier Aldana Reyes

Review: Horror: A Literary History Thumbnail

Review: Horror: A Literary History

Posted by Carly Stevenson on January 21, 2017 in Blog, Carly Stevenson, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

According to Reyes, the ‘transmedial, transhistorical and marketable genre’ (p.8) of horror is ‘largely defined by its affective pretences’ (p.7). That is to say, horror is inextricably bound up with the sense of disgust, fear and shock experienced by the reader. This is where horror diverges from its bedfellow terror. As the first two chapters of this book elucidate, the terms horror and terror were used interchangeably in seminal Gothic documents such as Edmund Burke’s A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, Anna Laetitia Aikin’s ‘On

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon Thumbnail

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon

Posted by Benjamin E. Noad on May 09, 2016 in Ben Noad, Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , , ,

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, link Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon edited by Linnie Blake and Xavier Aldana Reyes (New York and London: I. B. Tauris & Co., viagra 2016) This recent edited collection channels a political urgency that beckons further attention to the stylistics, nuances and cultural significance of global horror cinema. The essays it contains are inspired, richly detailed and are, in a word that may do justice to the entirety of the collection as a whole, haunting. The most immediate effect of this inquiry is realised in Blake and Reyes’s