werewolves

CFP: ‘Werewolves: Studies in Transformations’ Thumbnail

CFP: ‘Werewolves: Studies in Transformations’

Posted by Kaja Franck on September 30, 2015 in Guest Blog tagged with , , , , ,

I'm delighted to post a CFP for a special issue of Revenant, a journal dedicated to the supernatural. ‘Revenant: Critical and Creative Studies of the Supernatural’ is a peer-reviewed, online journal looking at the supernatural, the uncanny and the weird. Revenant is now accepting articles, creative writing pieces and book, film, game, event or art reviews for a themed issue on werewolves (due Autumn 2016), guest edited by Dr Janine Hatter and Kaja Franck. Werewolves have been a consistent, if side-lined, aspect of supernatural studies. From medieval and Early Modern poetry, through the

Company of Wolves, 3rd-5th September 2015 Thumbnail

Company of Wolves, 3rd-5th September 2015

Posted by Kaja Franck on July 28, 2015 in Guest Blog, Kaja Franck, News tagged with , , , , , ,

In Glen Duncan's The Last Werewolf (2011), one of the characters states that 'Werewolves are not a subject for the academe'. Though this is a little sobering if you are undertaking a PhD on werewolves, I'd suggest that the past few years have shown that this is not the case. Leslie Sconduto's Metamorphoses of the Werewolf (2008) has given a classical depth to the study of lycanthropy in literature whilst Sky's Penny Dreadful (2014-) has made their sole American character, the lupine Ethan Chandler, into a twisted version of Stoker's Quincey Morris from Dracula (1887). With werewolves

Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Sept 3rd-5th 2015: Extended Call for Papers and Panels Thumbnail

Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Sept 3rd-5th 2015: Extended Call for Papers and Panels

Posted by Matt Foley on April 08, 2015 in News tagged with , ,

OGOM: ‘The Company of Wolves’: Sociality, Animality, and Subjectivity in Literary and Cultural Narratives—Werewolves, Shapeshifters, and Feral Humans Wolves have long been the archetypal enemy of human company, preying on the unguarded boundaries of civilisation, threatening the pastoral of ideal sociality and figuring as sexual predators. Yet, in their way, with their complex pack interactions, they have served as a model for society. Lately, this ancient enemy has been rehabilitated and reappraised, and rewilding projects have attempted to admit them more closely into our lives. Ou

Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Sept 3rd-5th 2015: Call for Papers and Panels Thumbnail

Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Sept 3rd-5th 2015: Call for Papers and Panels

Posted by Matt Foley on January 29, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with ,

Open Graves, Open Minds: ‘The Company of Wolves’: Sociality, Animality, and Subjectivity in Literary and Cultural Narratives—Werewolves, Shapeshifters, and Feral Humans   Wolves have long been the archetypal enemy of human company, preying on the unguarded boundaries of civilisation, threatening the pastoral of ideal sociality and figuring as sexual predators. Yet, in their way, with their complex pack interactions, they have served as a model for society. Lately, this ancient enemy has been rehabilitated and reappraised, and rewilding projects have attempted to admit them mo

An Interview with New York Times Bestselling Author Gail Carriger Thumbnail

An Interview with New York Times Bestselling Author Gail Carriger

Posted by Aspasia Stephanou on September 29, 2010 in Interviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

October 2009 saw the publication of Soulless, the first of The Parasol Protectorate Books and Gail Carriger's debut novel. It was fresh, witty, and comic. It opened up a world populated with elegant vampires, werewolves, steampunk aesthetics and a heroine who had a taste for good tea and parasols. To paraphrase Jane Austen, "No one who had ever seen Alexia Tarabotti in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be an heroine." Alexia Tarabotti, like Catherine Morland in Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, is indeed a gothic heroine, and her adventures can be followed in Changeless (March, 2010)