vampires

CfP: Tropical Liminal: Urban Vampires in eTropic Thumbnail

CfP: Tropical Liminal: Urban Vampires in eTropic

Posted by Timothy Jones on January 12, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

CALL FOR PAPERS: Tropical Liminal: Urban Vampires (and other blood sucking monstrosities)     Special Issue Volume 16, Issue 1, 2017   Submission deadline: 28 February 2017     TROPICAL LIMINAL: URBAN VAMPIRES (and other blood sucking monstrosities)   The vampire and other monstrous beings constitute some of the most famous myths and stories that continue to haunt contemporary society. This special issue examines the presence of these beings within cities of the tropics and sub-tropics – from New Orleans in the deep south of Ameri

CfP: International Vampire Film and Arts Festival Conference Thumbnail

CfP: International Vampire Film and Arts Festival Conference

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 12, 2016 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

The International Vampire Film and Arts Fest is now inviting papers. Amazingly, the conference and fest will be held in the citadel of Sighisoara, the birthplace of Vlad Tepes, the historical Dracula. Three American institutions - Kutztown, Seton Hill and Emerson College - will be curating three distinctly themed days on '(En)Gendering the Vampire', 'Children of the Night: The Vampire Across Popular Culture', and 'Vampire on Screen: Life, Death and Immortality'. Details here: http://ivfaf.com/academic-conference Submissions due by 1 February 2017.

Vampires at the British Library Thumbnail

Vampires at the British Library

Posted by Timothy Jones on August 15, 2016 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

Just in time for Halloween, the British Library will be offering a five week course on everybody's favourite creatures of the night:   http://www.bl.uk/events/vampires Course dates: Thursdays 27 October and 3, 10, 17, 24 November Times: 18.00 – 20.00   From the BL website: ‘Dearest, your little heart is wounded; think me not cruel because I obey the irresistible law of my strength and weakness’ says Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla to her fascinated victim. Seductive yet repellent, ancient yet new, the vampire is a creature of contradictions – hero, villain

Review: George and Hughes (eds.). Open Graves, Open Minds (Manchester: MUP, 2013) Thumbnail

Review: George and Hughes (eds.). Open Graves, Open Minds (Manchester: MUP, 2013)

Posted by Matt Foley on August 19, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , ,

REVIEW: Sam George and Bill Hughes (eds.). Open Graves, case Open Minds: Representations of Vampires and the Undead from the Enlightenment to the Present (Manchester: MUP, 2013) By Matt Foley University of Stirling   Under the stewardship of Dr Sam George and Dr Bill Hughes, The Open Graves, Open Minds research project at the University of Hertfordshire has proved to be a rich and rewarding enterprise that – during its five-years of investigation – has facilitated a range of scholars to read productively many of the myriad transmutations of the vampire and the werewolf, both histor

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) Thumbnail

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014)

Posted by Matt Foley on June 24, 2015 in Blog, Carly Stevenson, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) By Carly Stevenson (University of Sheffield)   This debut from British-born, click Iranian-American writer-director Ana Lily Amirpour is at once nostalgic and innovative in its approach to the ever-popular (and some might say oversaturated) vampire motif. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night assimilates a wealth of classic horror imagery: the jerky body movements and monochromatic aesthetic give the film a surreal quality reminiscent of Nosferatu and The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari. And yet, troche this nod to early European horror contrasts w

Review: Lancaster University 5th Annual Contemporary Gothic Study Day Thumbnail

Review: Lancaster University 5th Annual Contemporary Gothic Study Day

Posted by Neal Kirk on June 19, 2015 in Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

On May 15 2015, price Lancaster University Department of English and Creative Writing held their fifth annual Contemporary Gothic Study Day. Known as one of the highlights of the academic calendar for gothic scholarship in the Northwest of England it was the best of the three I have attended. An audience of up to nearly forty included Lancaster University English MA students and new PhD candidates from as far afield as Italy. Lancaster’s Dr. Catherine Spooner (Fashioning Gothic Bodies (2004), Contemporary Gothic (2006)), welcomed everybody and introduced the keynote speaker, Dr. Claire Nall

Review: Moonrise Falling, by Adrian L. Jawort Thumbnail

Review: Moonrise Falling, by Adrian L. Jawort

Posted by Dale Townshend on February 24, 2015 in Reviews tagged with

Moonrise Falling, by Adrian L. Jawort (Billing: Off the Pass Press, 2014) Reviewed by Dr Gennie Dyson The character of the vampire has been used to highlight societal problems since the nineteenth century; during this period, vampires mirrored the fear of the degenerate and the sexual deviant; in the 1980s they became harbingers of plague in a reflection of fears regarding H.I.V and A.I.D.S. The vampire has also been used as a tool to discuss matters of race and prejudice, such as The Gilda Stories by Jewelle Gomez, concerns close to the heart of Adrian L. Jawort’s Moonrise Falling, focu

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire Thumbnail

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire

Posted by Matt Foley on February 19, 2015 in Blog tagged with , ,

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire By Lauren Owen, Durham University Who is Varney? He is rather overshadowed by other pre-Dracula vampires like Lord Ruthven, the Byronic villain of Polidori’s short story “The Vampyre” (1819), or Carmilla, the dangerously seductive anti-heroine of LeFanu’s 1872 novella of the same name. Varney, the Vampyre was a long-running serial probably written by James Malcolm Rymer between 1845 and 1847. (The work was also associated with Thomas Preskett Prest, who is credited with the authorship of The String of Pearls, the novel which introduced the vill

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience Thumbnail

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on February 07, 2015 in Blog, Evan Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Gothic became a self-parodying genre very quickly: Jane Austen wrote the self-reflexive Northanger Abbey in 1798, though it did not see publication for nearly twenty years after that. Two hundred years later, the gothic has expanded and adapted, and a mocking inter-textual awareness is a key quality for the popularity of the genre. The audience for this fiction has long been perceived as skewing feminine, as is recognized and critiqued in Austen’s work. The modern southern gothic of True Blood (2007-2014), and American gothic Supernatural (2005-ongoing), also recognize a majority female fan

Review: Reading Vampire Gothic Through Blood: Bloodlines Thumbnail

Review: Reading Vampire Gothic Through Blood: Bloodlines

Posted by Alexandra Campbell on November 28, 2014 in Alexandra Campbell, Blog tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

Reading Vampire Gothic Through Blood: Bloodlines By Aspasia Stephanou   Across the past two decades the classic Gothic figure of the Vampire has – despite their iconic solitary, elusive and secretive nature – hardly been out of the public eye since the release of Francis Ford Coppola's Bram Stoker's Dracula in 1992. Since the early 1990s, Vampires of all shapes and leather-clad sizes have hit our small and big screens with varying levels of cult-pop impact: Interview with A Vampire (1994); Buffy the Vampire Slayer (Series, 1997-2003); Blade Trilogy (1998-2004); Ultraviolet  (S