Twilight

Review: The Twilight of the Gothic? Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance (Winner of the Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for best book in Gothic criticism) Thumbnail

Review: The Twilight of the Gothic? Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance (Winner of the Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for best book in Gothic criticism)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on September 25, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Twilight of the Gothic?: Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance. Joseph Crawford. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2014. ISBN: 978-1-78316-064-8 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Winner of the Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for the best book in Gothic criticism, Joseph Crawford’s The Twilight of the Gothic?: Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance traces the historical development and rise in popularity of the paranormal romance and examines the reasons behind the divisive reactions to the genre. He begins by identifying three phases in its development

Natalie Wilson, Seduced by Twilight and Gizelle Liza Anatol (ed.), Bringing Light to Twilight Thumbnail

Natalie Wilson, Seduced by Twilight and Gizelle Liza Anatol (ed.), Bringing Light to Twilight

Posted by Chloe Buckley on October 11, 2011 in Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , ,

Natalie Wilson, Seduced by Twilight, McFarland and Co. 2011. ISBN: 978-0786460427 Gizelle Liza Anatol (ed.), Bringing Light to Twilight, Palgrave MacMillan, 2011. ISBN: 978-0230110687 “I’m so mad you think I read Twilight.” Fright Night I sympathise with Fright Night Ed’s frustration. When I tell people I’m researching Gothic children’s literature, often they say, ‘So, stuff like Twilight, then?’ Was it out of sheer stubbornness that I resisted so long? Literary snobbery? Was it the fact that when the films came out, my ‘tween’ niece thought they were ‘sooo amazing

What’s Wrong With Sparkly Vampires? Thumbnail

What’s Wrong With Sparkly Vampires?

Posted by Hannah Priest on July 20, 2011 in Dr Hannah Priest, Guest Blog tagged with , , ,

In my previous post on this blog, I credited Stephenie Meyer with helping to create a new sub-genre of speculative fiction: YA paranormal romance. Today, I would like to consider one of her other, somewhat more controversial, creations: the sparkly vampire. When Twilight’s Edward Cullen walks in the sunshine, his skin glitters as though covered in precious gemstones. Little about the Twilight novels evokes such a vehement response – from both readers and non-readers alike – as the vampire that sparkles. But what is it that is making vampire fans so angry?

Real vampires don’t sparkle Thumbnail

Real vampires don’t sparkle

Posted by Marie Mulvey-Roberts on April 18, 2011 in Dr. Marie Mulvey-Roberts, Guest Blog tagged with , , ,

I have been in email correspondence with an author, who wants to know if I think vampires are real. There is never an easy answer.  What does surprise me though is the number of people who ask me that question.  It is probably more to do with me than them. Last year, while I was preparing to give a paper at the annual Gothic conference in Mexico City, my massage therapist warned me about a vampire she had encountered there.  She was quite sure that he would make a bee-line for me but he must have assiduously avoided me. I was not disappointed. The nearest one should be able to get to

Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season Eight Thumbnail

Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season Eight

Posted by Tom Paskins on January 08, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

Ever since George Lucas resurrected the Star Wars franchise in 1999 with Episode 1: The Phantom Menace, there seems to have been a trend for film makers to try and breathe fresh life into series which have apparently long since died a death

©Branding and Gothic in Contemporary Popular Culture: the case of Twilight Thumbnail

©Branding and Gothic in Contemporary Popular Culture: the case of Twilight

Posted by Glennis Byron on December 31, 2010 in Blog tagged with , , , , ,

In popular culture today, Gothic is not just a product, it is also a brand