the Grotesque

Marvin Macy: The Strong Man of Grotesque Power and Heteronormativity Thumbnail

Marvin Macy: The Strong Man of Grotesque Power and Heteronormativity

Posted by Rachel Carden on May 19, 2017 in Blog, Rachel Carden tagged with , , , , ,

In my previous blog, I established Miss Amelia’s café as a place of inclusive community, linked to Mikhail Bakhtin’s conceptualisation of carnivals and their connection to freak shows. I highlighted that the space engendered a sense of community where its occupants’ grotesque physicality and their subversive genders were accepted. This post explores the grotesque power of patriarchy using Foucauldian theory and its resistance to the collapse of dichotomous gender and sexuality binaries in Carson McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951). Justin Edwards and Rune Graulund, i

A Strong Man, a Hermaphrodite and a Hunchbacked Dwarf Walk into a Café: Carnival and Community in McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951) Thumbnail

A Strong Man, a Hermaphrodite and a Hunchbacked Dwarf Walk into a Café: Carnival and Community in McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951)

Posted by Rachel Carden on May 12, 2017 in Blog, Rachel Carden tagged with , , , ,

In my previous blog, I summarised the plot of McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café and aligned it with key genres and tropes to highlight its Gothicism and cultural critique of patriarchy through grotesque tropes. This post uses Bakhtinian theory to situate Miss Amelia’s café as a place of community, a theatrical space of gender performance and bodily oddities, which temporarily succeeds in challenging patriarchy.   The philosopher and literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin’s Rabelais and His world (1965) analyses the work of the Renaissance writer François Rabelais to refocu

Carson McCullers and Genre: Female Gothic, American Gothic and the Southern Gothic’s Grotesquerie Thumbnail

Carson McCullers and Genre: Female Gothic, American Gothic and the Southern Gothic’s Grotesquerie

Posted by Rachel Carden on May 05, 2017 in Blog, Rachel Carden tagged with , , , , , ,

Carson McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951) portrays the destructive power of the patriarchal regime.[1] McCullers’ use of grotesquerie brings the marginalised, the androgynous, the deformed and the weird to the forefront of her novella. In doing so, she makes the abnormal normal and the importance of binary distinctions, such as masculine and feminine, gay and straight, breakdown, at least temporarily. We feel compassion for those traditionally omitted from society and power – particularly, the distinctly masculine Miss Amelia – and we mourn the loss of a fleetingly enjoy

Patrick McGrath Exhibition: the work begins Thumbnail

Patrick McGrath Exhibition: the work begins

Posted by Matt Foley on October 08, 2015 in Blog, McGrath Symposium, News tagged with , , , ,

Patrick McGrath Exhibition: the work begins   'Asylums, Pathologies and the Themes of Madness: Patrick McGrath and his Gothic Contemporaries', a symposium to mark the emergence of a new Patrick McGrath archive at Stirling, is to be held at the University's library on Saturday January 16th 2016. Potential speakers are encouraged to submit abstracts by next Friday 16th October. As a way of whetting the appetite for the day itself, we are delighted to share here some images of a small selection of materials from the archive (with special thanks to the photographer, Tanja Jurkov

CfP: Patrick McGrath Symposium, Stirling, January 2016 Thumbnail

CfP: Patrick McGrath Symposium, Stirling, January 2016

Posted by Matt Foley on August 14, 2015 in Blog, McGrath Symposium tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Call for Papers: Asylums, Pathologies and the Themes of Madness: Patrick McGrath and his Gothic Contemporaries University of Stirling, Scotland A one-day symposium       Saturday 16th January 2016      (Abstracts due: Friday October 16th 2015)      Keynote Event During the symposium we will be delighted to invite speakers and attendees to view exhibits from the newly acquired Patrick McGrath archive at the University of Stirling’s library. Keynote Speakers Professor Lucie Armitt, University of Lincoln – author of Twentieth-Century Gothic (University of Wales Press,

The Grotesque Orgasm: Gothic’s Dirtiest Trick. Thumbnail

The Grotesque Orgasm: Gothic’s Dirtiest Trick.

Posted by Danielle Hancock on June 01, 2015 in Blog, Danielle Hancock tagged with , , , , , ,

Note: This post contains sexually explicit language.   “The grotesque orgasm” is a phrase that’s been lurking in my mind for a long time - since some friends and myself admitted to getting hot under the collar during parts of Brett Easton Ellis' American Psycho, only to be bodily horrified at the next line. Simply, American Psycho constituted  some of the most bluntly provocative literature we'd ever read, with the unhappiest endings we’d ever experienced. Let me give you an example: [here imagine the antics of an explicit 2.5 page consensual three-person sex scene, build

The Gothic and the Grotesque: The Mysteries of the Golden Mansion Thumbnail

The Gothic and the Grotesque: The Mysteries of the Golden Mansion

Posted by Rarignac on May 27, 2012 in Guest Blog, Noel Montague-Etienne Rarignac tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Domus Aurea. © Rarignac Bordeaux, Midi, La Fête de la Pentecôte, 2012 (more…)