Television

The Handmaid’s Tale as Dystopian Gothic Thumbnail

The Handmaid’s Tale as Dystopian Gothic

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 03, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

By Egon Cools   As an effort towards new criticism of Gothic works, this blog series addresses Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale – a novel published in 1986, but holding more relevance and significance today than ever before. This first part contextualises The Handmaid’s Tale through an introduction to dystopian fiction and the genre’s links to the Gothic, and also relates the novel to female oppression as presented in ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’. The second entry in this series will address the resurgence in popularity of The Handmaid’s Tale in recent years, and

Where the Camera can not Take Us: Sounding the Unseeable in Game of Thrones. Thumbnail

Where the Camera can not Take Us: Sounding the Unseeable in Game of Thrones.

Posted by Danielle Hancock on May 06, 2016 in Danielle Hancock, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , , ,

  Warning: This blog-post contains spoilers for Game of Thrones, Season 6.   Daenerys Targaryen’s dragons are rough to the touch. The plains of Winterfell are swept with fast, sharp winds. A human skull smashes with the same wet burst as a watermelon. I learnt these things, and many more, from listening to Game of Thrones. Mostly, we tend to watch Game of Thrones, and with good reason. The show seldom shies away from graphic detail. Gouged eyes, decapitation, burning children, full frontal nudity  - in the face of all these and more the camera’s gaze never wavers. Indee

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen Thumbnail

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on June 30, 2015 in Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , , , ,

For my final blog, I would like to examine my actual process of adaptation more closely, in order to discuss the practical steps which I undertook in transposing Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho into the format of a script for television. In doing so, I will be referring back to the excerpt of my adaptation which I posted in my last blog. For those of you who did not have a chance to read it, here it is again: EPISODE 1, SCENE 4 FADE IN: INT. EMILY’S BED CHAMBER- MIDNIGHT. The only light in Emily’s chamber emanates from the meagre glow of several candles on the mantelpiece

An ‘Obscure and Terrible’ Place: Restructuring Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ for the TV Screen Thumbnail

An ‘Obscure and Terrible’ Place: Restructuring Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ for the TV Screen

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on June 05, 2015 in Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , , ,

 In my last blog on my six-part adaptation of Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho for TV, vialis 40mg I discussed the way in which Radcliffe’s text demands significant restructuring in order to render it suitable for a visual re-representation of the romance for a modern audience. I first stumbled upon Radcliffe’s work during my initial reading of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey when I was 15 years old. As many of you will know who have read—or attempted to read—a Radcliffe novel, the experience can be somewhat daunting, and, needless to say, rather unlike Catherine Morla

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience Thumbnail

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on February 07, 2015 in Blog, Evan Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Gothic became a self-parodying genre very quickly: Jane Austen wrote the self-reflexive Northanger Abbey in 1798, though it did not see publication for nearly twenty years after that. Two hundred years later, the gothic has expanded and adapted, and a mocking inter-textual awareness is a key quality for the popularity of the genre. The audience for this fiction has long been perceived as skewing feminine, as is recognized and critiqued in Austen’s work. The modern southern gothic of True Blood (2007-2014), and American gothic Supernatural (2005-ongoing), also recognize a majority female fan

Review: Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death

Posted by Chloe Buckley on November 24, 2014 in Reviews tagged with , , , , , , ,

Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2014 ISBN-10: 0230759823 ISBN-13: 978-0230759824   Last year, I was delighted to review Chris Riddell’s Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse, winner of the 2013 Costa Children’s book award. Ghost of a Mouse eschewed the ‘hard issues’ normally associated with award-winning children’s fiction, providing a delightful and witty rewriting of classic gothic tropes. The sequel, Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death, published earlier this year, takes the reader even further away from serious fare, with more jo

Contemporary Gothic Public Lectures Thumbnail

Contemporary Gothic Public Lectures

Posted by Matt Foley on September 03, 2013 in Blog, News tagged with , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Gothic (7th, 14th & 21st October 2013) Convened by Dr Xavier Aldana Reyes The Gothic is, quite simply, everywhere: from the record-breaking successes of the Twilight vampire films and the TV series The Walking Dead, to the critically acclaimed videogames Left for Dead and Dead Space. Its ubiquity is nothing new. Since its first wave of success in the late eighteenth century, the Gothic has proved to be a truly chameleonic artistic mode, consistently adapting itself to suit the tastes of contemporary audiences whilst simultaneously projecting their innermost anxieti

A review of The Following Thumbnail

A review of The Following

Posted by Matt Foley on January 26, 2013 in Reviews tagged with , , ,

The Following - Episode 1 (2013) For all of its fakery, the Gothic mode is at times explicit about its reworking of certain tropes and character types. Strangely, an example that Fox's new drama The Following (2013) brings to mind is the titular homage of T.J. Horsley Curties' The Monk of Udolpho (1805-6) to Lewis and Radcliffe. If American crime drama was to take Horsley Curties' lead, the rather derivative The Following could be entitled 'The Lecter of CSI' or, perhaps, 'The Drunk Cop Archetype of Criminal Minds'. Why discuss it here? Its incarnation of the serial killer - Joe Carroll

Hemlock Grove comes to Netflix Thumbnail

Hemlock Grove comes to Netflix

Posted by Matt Foley on January 14, 2013 in News tagged with , ,

Netflix is set to release its original series Hemlock Grove this April. The series is produced by Eli Roth and stars Famke Janssen and Dougray Scott. Early indications suggest that there may be a werewolf among the inhabitants of Hemlock. Empire magazine reports: Based on Brian McGreevy’s titular novel (and adapted by the writer himself alongside Roth), and Hemlock Grove is set in a small Pennsylvania steel town whose best years are long behind it. Now a weird, dilapidated place, the death of a 17-year-old girl prompts an investigation into the area’s dark secrets, seething with super

Sam Mendes and Skyfall writer John Logan to make new Gothic TV series Thumbnail

Sam Mendes and Skyfall writer John Logan to make new Gothic TV series

Posted by hollycuthbert on January 14, 2013 in News tagged with ,

Sam Mendes and John Logan are set to make Gothic television history with a new Penny Dreadful series for America’s Showtime. A ‘psychosexual’ drama set in Victorian London promises to bring us the Gothic greats, Frankenstein, Dracula and Dorian Gray among others. I can already hear the groan of some Gothic scholars at this highly predictable choice of characters for the series but with their popularity of over 100 years who are we to argue with that? The series, still in the early stages of creation, promises ‘visual spectacle’, ‘psychological insight’ and mesmerising televisio