Strawberry Hill

Gothic Architecture (from the Gothic MOOC) Thumbnail

Gothic Architecture (from the Gothic MOOC)

Posted by Peter Lindfield on July 26, 2016 in Uncategorized tagged with , , , , ,

There was no fixed way to identify the various architectural facets of medieval Gothic in the Georgian period. Indeed, a definitive ‘system’ to understand and interpret British medieval architecture was only arrived at in 1817 when Thomas Rickman published his An Attempt to Discriminate the Styles of Architecture in England. A later edition, digitised by Google, is available here for you to consult. If you are particularly interested in understanding how those in late Georgian Britain understood and interpreted the phases of medieval Gothic architecture, you may wish to read, or skim

What’s in a name? The Problem with Strawberry Hill Gothic as a Label, and Braziers, Oxfordshire Thumbnail

What’s in a name? The Problem with Strawberry Hill Gothic as a Label, and Braziers, Oxfordshire

Posted by Peter Lindfield on June 21, 2016 in Peter Lindfield tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

‘Strawberry Hill Gothic’ is a label often banded about when discussing eighteenth-century domestic Gothic architecture and design. Frankly, it not an overwhelmingly positive label: the important Victorian architects, designers and writers Charles Locke Eastlake (1833–1906) and A.W.N. Pugin (1812–52) made sure that Strawberry Hill was ingrained in our minds and imagination as a whimsical and, effectively, bad piece of eighteenth-century Gothic. Eastlake, in his monumental study, A History of the Gothic Revival (1872) condemns Walpole and his villa, Strawberry Hill: The interior, or

Oh, to furnish a house with the true scraps of the Barons’ Wars Thumbnail

Oh, to furnish a house with the true scraps of the Barons’ Wars

Posted by Peter Lindfield on March 31, 2016 in Blog, Peter Lindfield, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , ,

The collection of relics from past civilisations and places was not a new phenomenon in the 1750s when an interest in amassing and displaying medieval furniture developed. Horace Walpole (1717–97), author, collector and son of the first Prime Minster, Sir Robert Walpole, started collecting Greek and Roman antiquities whilst on the Grand Tour of the Continent in 1739. However, collecting relics from Britain and Europe’s medieval past became integral to the furnishing of Gothic interiors after the mid-eighteenth century. The character of medieval furniture and notions of authenticity were q

Translating the Middle Ages in the Georgian World Thumbnail

Translating the Middle Ages in the Georgian World

Posted by Peter Lindfield on March 03, 2016 in Blog, Peter Lindfield tagged with , , ,

  Transport within Britain during the mid-eighteenth century became easier. Consequently amateurs and professionals interested in British architecture could make their way to such buildings with increasing ease. At the same time interest in Gothic architecture, design, and its association with a noble court society governed by chivalric principles was growing. The Gothic style was not examined in a vacuum, but initially was structurally, aesthetically, and intellectually compared with and grafted onto the gold standard of Classical architecture. This posting examines Batty Langley’s

Review: Gothic Tourism (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: Gothic Tourism (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 21, 2016 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Gothic Tourism Emma McEvoy Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-137-39128-5 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Emma McEvoy’s study of Gothic tourism opens with a personal account of her experience of a scare attraction in the form of Alton Towers’ ‘The Sanctuary’. Noting the narrative structure of the tour as well as the many visual, kinetic, and auditory effects, she presents it as an example of Gothic tourism, which according to her interpretation, is ‘the act of visiting, for the purposes of leisure, a location that is presented in terms of the Gothic’ (McEvoy 2016, 3).

Public Lecture Series at Strawberry Hill: May–June 2016 Thumbnail

Public Lecture Series at Strawberry Hill: May–June 2016

Posted by Peter Lindfield on February 01, 2016 in Blog, News, Peter Lindfield tagged with , , , , , ,

One of the most atmospheric public-engagement activities associated with the AHRC-funded research project based here at Silting, Writing Britain’s Ruins, 1700–1850: The Architectural Imagination, is a public lecture series. The six lectures, detailed below, will take place in the largest and most imposing room in Horace Walpole's 'Little Gothic Castle', Strawberry Hill, Twickenham (TW1 4ST) — the Gallery, or State Apartment. Although now mostly devoid of its tirelessly curated collection of paintings and objects, as recorded here in a watercolour (1781) by Thomas Sandby, this lectu

Gothic Drama: Sign of the Strawberry Thumbnail

Gothic Drama: Sign of the Strawberry

Posted by Dale Townshend on March 26, 2012 in News tagged with , ,

Artemis Productions, in collaboration with the Strawberry Hill Trust, are currently running a production of a Gothic drama by Dianne Cutlack entitled Sign of the Strawberry, performed within the various rooms of Horace Walpole's historic Gothic mansion, Strawberry Hill, in Twickenham, London.   Enticingly, the performance culminates in a ghostly ball within the grand interior of the Gallery at Strawberry Hill.   The script is based not only upon Walpole's The Castle of Otranto, but also upon the insights into Walpole himself gleaned from his voluminous correspondence.  For further details,

Walpole’s Strawberry Hill Thumbnail

Walpole’s Strawberry Hill

Posted by Dale Townshend on October 11, 2011 in Blog tagged with , ,

I recently made a research-trip to Horace Walpole's recently refurbished Gothic villa Strawberry Hill, in Twickenham, London.  There is so much to say about this very special place, but for the moment, I wanted to share some pictures of the place with you. Stained Glass in Blue Bedchamber.

Eighteenth-Century Gothic: Performance and Partying Thumbnail

Eighteenth-Century Gothic: Performance and Partying

Posted by Emma McEvoy on May 23, 2011 in Dr Emma McEvoy, Guest Blog tagged with , ,

Well, I saw Love Never Dies last week – and am still digesting it.  I’ve never in my life, apart from in detective fiction, come across such an unexpected ending.  More of that another time. I’ve been thinking a lot this week about performance in relation to eighteenth-century Gothic as I’ve been going over the proofs for an article I’ve written which looks at Strawberry Hill and Fonthill Abbey.  I’ve also been writing on Matthew Lewis’s plays.  This turned out to be a useful conjunction as it forced me to think about performance not just in relation to houses, masquerades

From Strawberry Hill Gothic to the Surreal: Horace Walpole and Jan Švankmajer Thumbnail

From Strawberry Hill Gothic to the Surreal: Horace Walpole and Jan Švankmajer

Posted by Brigid Cherry on October 02, 2010 in Dr Brigid Cherry, Guest Blog tagged with , , ,

As a scholar in the field of horror cinema I consider myself fortunate to work in a most Gothic environment, for my (admittedly rather mundane) office at St Mary’s University College looks out over Horace Walpole’s Little Gothick Castle in Strawberry Hill. In a further example of propitious fate (I am even tempted to call it serendipity), just as I was being invited to contribute this guest blog to Gothic Imagination the newly-restored house was being unveiled from behind scaffolding and plastic sheeting, with the Friends of Strawberry Hill gearing up for its reopening. To begin this