steampunk

Mark Hodder Interviewed by Dr. Linnie Blake Thumbnail

Mark Hodder Interviewed by Dr. Linnie Blake

Posted by Matt Foley on March 04, 2013 in Interviews tagged with , ,

The Burton and Swinburne Trilogy: Steam-Age Adventures in Neo-Liberal Liminality: An Interview With Mark Hodder By Dr Linnie Blake "Steampunk is, for me, the perfect arena in which to explore socio-economic policies that seem to have spiralled farther and farther out of control since those punk years. The capitalist system, in divorcing itself from social responsibility, has so undermined itself that people are now waking up and fighting back. The people who led us into this dire situation have been exposed as money-grubbing, self-serving, power-hungry, corrupt criminals (if not in lega

Pop-Goth and Post Goth: Two Readings of Two Post-Gothic Fashions Thumbnail

Pop-Goth and Post Goth: Two Readings of Two Post-Gothic Fashions

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on November 22, 2011 in Blog tagged with , , ,

It is doubtless that today’s Gothic fashion sells and sells in a particularly Gothic fashion. The Pop-Gothic culture reflected in the clothes – where the cute is made morbid and the morbid made cute, exemplified by many a headless Hello Kitty – serves to parody late twentieth-century sub-cultural manifestations of Gothic’s manufactured morbidity, its over-reliance upon interpretations of the Gothic as a source of gloom and as a style or social practice suitable for teenage transformation.

An Interview with New York Times Bestselling Author Gail Carriger Thumbnail

An Interview with New York Times Bestselling Author Gail Carriger

Posted by Aspasia Stephanou on September 29, 2010 in Interviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

October 2009 saw the publication of Soulless, the first of The Parasol Protectorate Books and Gail Carriger's debut novel. It was fresh, witty, and comic. It opened up a world populated with elegant vampires, werewolves, steampunk aesthetics and a heroine who had a taste for good tea and parasols. To paraphrase Jane Austen, "No one who had ever seen Alexia Tarabotti in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be an heroine." Alexia Tarabotti, like Catherine Morland in Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, is indeed a gothic heroine, and her adventures can be followed in Changeless (March, 2010)

Gail Carriger, Soulless: An Alexia Tarabotti Novel Thumbnail

Gail Carriger, Soulless: An Alexia Tarabotti Novel

Posted by Aspasia Stephanou on February 21, 2010 in Reviews tagged with , , ,

Comic Gothic Steampunk