psychoanalysis

“Into the Moving Unquiet Depths”: Dreams and the Unconscious in Rebecca (1938) Thumbnail

“Into the Moving Unquiet Depths”: Dreams and the Unconscious in Rebecca (1938)

Posted by Pam Sherman on June 16, 2017 in Blog, Pamela Sherman tagged with , , , ,

This blog series has chiefly been concerned with investigating the narrator's fight to establish her own identity in Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca. The second Mrs. de Winter's almost morbid fascination with Rebecca as a model of the perfect wife, coupled with Mrs. Danvers' cruel treatment and Maxim's refusal to regard his wife as an adult are all contributing factors to the narrator's struggles. However, when the mystery surrounding Rebecca is dispelled and Maxim reveals his crime, a change takes place in the narrator. Far from being surprised by her husband's propensity for murder, she list

Infantilizing the Narrator: The Husband as Father in Rebecca (1938) Thumbnail

Infantilizing the Narrator: The Husband as Father in Rebecca (1938)

Posted by Pam Sherman on June 09, 2017 in Blog, Pamela Sherman tagged with , , ,

In my last post, female identity in Rebecca was discussed and the narrator's goal of being a good wife as an ideal ego, Rebecca as the ego ideal, and Mrs. Danvers as a superego that attempts to tear down the narrator at every turn were established. This week, we will take a look at Maxim's part in the narrator's struggles with identity. Through his infantilization of the second Mrs. de Winter and attempts to protect her innocence, it becomes apparent that Maxim also performs a superego-like function by preventing her from fully embracing her role as a wife. From the moment that they bec

In Rebecca’s Shadow: Female Identity in Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca (1938) Thumbnail

In Rebecca’s Shadow: Female Identity in Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca (1938)

Posted by Pam Sherman on June 02, 2017 in Blog, Pamela Sherman tagged with , , , ,

Ellen Moers first coined the term "Female Gothic" to simply refer to Gothic texts written by women. Since then, the field of Female Gothic has expanded to include issues relating to women in these texts, including anxieties surrounding identity and entrapment. Patricia Murphy makes a distinction between Female Gothic of eighteenth and nineteenth century novels, and what she calls New Woman Gothic. She argues that, in earlier texts, "the period preceding marriage typically is fraught with Gothic difficulties such as entrapment whereas, in the latter texts, marriage itself becomes the horrif

An Interview with F.R. Tallis Thumbnail

An Interview with F.R. Tallis

Posted by Matt Foley on July 04, 2013 in Blog, Interviews tagged with , ,

F.R. Tallis is a writer with a keen awareness of the Gothic tradition. Under the name Frank Tallis he has held lecturing posts at the Institute of Psychiatry and King's College, London. He has written self help manuals, non-fiction for the general reader, academic text books and journal papers, as well as several novels, including The Liebermann Papers detective books. Installments of The Liebermann series have been translated into fourteen languages. The Sleep Room, his second novel as F.R. Tallis, is out this week. It follows 2012's The Forbidden. *****************************************

Reflections on Mirrors and the Gothic Thumbnail

Reflections on Mirrors and the Gothic

Posted by Matt Foley on October 04, 2010 in Blog tagged with , , , , ,

Some Reflections on Mirrors By Matt Foley, University of Stirling The first thing that comes to mind when ruminating over the specific role mirrors and reflections have to play in the Gothic mode is a negative instance: namely, that the vampire has no reflection. Immediately there is the problem, then, of talking about something that is missing and foreclosed, and I will come to this shortly. In general, though, what is clear is that any uncanny fall out from the staging of a subject's encounter with the mirror is symptomatic of just how important (mis)recognising our own semblance in th