postcolonial gothic

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 05, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction Gina Wisker Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-137-30348-6 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell In the introduction to her latest monograph, Gina Wisker defines contemporary women’s Gothic writing as the ‘subversive granddaughter of eighteenth-century Gothic fiction’ (Wisker 27) due to its ability to mix horror and fantasy, liberate forbidden desires, and expose repressed or hidden secrets from the past. Her study brings attention to the many essential links between feminist perspectives / critiques and contemporary women’s Gothic writi

Monstrosity, False Twins, and the Bush Thumbnail

Monstrosity, False Twins, and the Bush

Posted by Madelyn Schoonover on April 15, 2016 in Blog, Madelyn Schoonover tagged with , , , ,

In part two, I discussed Jessamy's fractured identity in The Icarus Girl, and how the patriarchal modes of colonizing England and Nigeria both hinder Jessamy's ability to assert a stable identity. I then introduced the ambiguous spirit TillyTilly as a productive presence in Jessamy's life that helps her begin to find self-confidence. Though Jessamy initially finds comfort in TillyTilly’s ability to transgress identity, as the novel progresses, TillyTilly becomes a much more fixed and dangerous thing. In keeping with the traditional Gothic trope of doubling, TillyTilly becomes a mons

Dangerous Doubling and Fractured Identity in “The Icarus Girl” Thumbnail

Dangerous Doubling and Fractured Identity in “The Icarus Girl”

Posted by Madelyn Schoonover on April 09, 2016 in Blog, Madelyn Schoonover tagged with , , , ,

In part one of this three part series, I explained how the colonial program implemented the concept of the European Family of Man to control colonized societies, and to completely erase the colonized female from discourse. I proposed that postcolonial Gothic is a medium for colonized females to regain this lost voice. In this section, I will explore some of the traditionally Gothic tropes that Helen Oyeyemi utilizes to interrogate a postcolonial past and move toward a more empowered future for her protagonist Jessamy in The Icarus Girl. Like many traditional Gothic heroines such as J

Female Gothic, Post-Colonialism, and The Icarus Girl Thumbnail

Female Gothic, Post-Colonialism, and The Icarus Girl

Posted by Madelyn Schoonover on April 01, 2016 in Madelyn Schoonover tagged with , , , , ,

Since the Whig politician Horace Walpole first penned The Castle of Otranto in 1764, Gothic authors have been objecting to rigid social and political conventions and structures, questioning authority in its sundry forms from tyrannical patriarch to power-hungry Prioress. In stories of terror and intrigue such as Matthew Lewis’ The Monk (1796), readers enter an uncanny literary universe of the hyperreal; places where ghosts of past traumas are literal and rationality will not always save the heroes. As Andrew Smith and William Hughes note, the Gothic is a “celebration of the irrational,

Symposium – Helen Oyeyemi Thumbnail

Symposium – Helen Oyeyemi

Posted by Chloe Buckley on December 11, 2014 in News tagged with , , ,

Symposium on Helen Oyeyemi Teeside University, 18th February, 2015 For those of you interested in contemporary gothic, feminism, and postcolonial gothic - a Symposium on the work of British-Nigerian author, Helen Oyeyemi - author of White is for Witching, Mr Fox, The Icarus Girl, The Opposite House and Boy Snow Bird  - is being held at Teeside University, 18th February 2015. See attached poster for details and registration information. Oyeyemi is one of the most innovative and exciting writers of contemporary gothic fiction and this symposium brings together a number of leading schol