parody

Review: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright

Posted by Maria Cohut on October 15, 2015 in Blog, Maria Cohurt, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2015 ISBN-10: 1447277899 ISBN-13: 978-1447277897 Following the 'gift' booklet released on the occasion of World Book Day this year, Macmillan have published yet another instalment in Chris Riddell's 'Goth Girl' series: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright. Right in time, too, for the celebration of the Ada Lovelace Day on the 13th October (happy belated Ada Lovelace Day!), with another story about her fictional namesake, Ada Goth, 'the only child of Lord Goth, England's foremost cycling poet', also prominently featuring

Review: Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen

Posted by Maria Cohut on March 14, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

  Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2015 ISBN-10: 1447282477 ISBN-13: 978-1447282471 Written and published on the occasion of this year's World Book Day, Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen is Chris Riddell's newest installment in the 'Goth Girl' children's series, following Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse and Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death. Unlike the previous two books, this one is considerably shorter, and also not nearly as stunning as an object: while Riddell's complex and lighthearted illustrations still provide enough for the gluttono

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience Thumbnail

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on February 07, 2015 in Blog, Evan Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Gothic became a self-parodying genre very quickly: Jane Austen wrote the self-reflexive Northanger Abbey in 1798, though it did not see publication for nearly twenty years after that. Two hundred years later, the gothic has expanded and adapted, and a mocking inter-textual awareness is a key quality for the popularity of the genre. The audience for this fiction has long been perceived as skewing feminine, as is recognized and critiqued in Austen’s work. The modern southern gothic of True Blood (2007-2014), and American gothic Supernatural (2005-ongoing), also recognize a majority female fan

Review: Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death

Posted by Chloe Buckley on November 24, 2014 in Reviews tagged with , , , , , , ,

Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2014 ISBN-10: 0230759823 ISBN-13: 978-0230759824   Last year, I was delighted to review Chris Riddell’s Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse, winner of the 2013 Costa Children’s book award. Ghost of a Mouse eschewed the ‘hard issues’ normally associated with award-winning children’s fiction, providing a delightful and witty rewriting of classic gothic tropes. The sequel, Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death, published earlier this year, takes the reader even further away from serious fare, with more jo

Jokerbats: Goth Music with a Parodic Twist Thumbnail

Jokerbats: Goth Music with a Parodic Twist

Posted by Dale Townshend on February 28, 2014 in News tagged with ,

Byron and Trix make up the band ‘Jokerbats’ – like the White Stripes of hard rock. Their new single ‘Vampire’ is due for release on the 24th February and can be previewed below: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s5DnwlzNbQ&feature=youtu.be Website. But before you listen, you should be introduced into their world as it’s not for the faint hearted... Welcome to EvilZgate, a fictional land of castles, heavy mists and dark mystery fraught by warfare between the evil ‘Demoncock Corporation’ who aim to monopolise the music market with heartless talent shows fighting the no

Review: Goth Girl and the Ghost of A Mouse Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Ghost of A Mouse

Posted by Chloe Buckley on February 14, 2014 in Blog, Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , ,

Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse by Chris Riddell Publisher: Macmillan (Sep 2013) ISBN-10: 0230759807 ISBN-13: 978-0230759800 Review by Chloe Buckley Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse is a beautiful and wonderfully silly book. I confess: it is one of the most enjoyable books that I have read for some time. However, beyond my immediate response as a newly converted Chris Riddell fan, I would argue that the pleasures offered by Goth Girl are timely and pertinent in terms of understanding why contemporary children’s gothic continues to flourish as a popular and literary form. The succes

Mexican Gothic part II: On Vampires and Parody. Thumbnail

Mexican Gothic part II: On Vampires and Parody.

Posted by Inés Ordiz on December 11, 2011 in Guest Blog, Inés Ordiz Alonso-Collada tagged with , , , ,

One cannot refer to Mexican gothic fiction without mentioning Carlos Fuentes. In fact, I would dare to say that one cannot refer to Mexican 20th century fiction in general without mentioning Carlos Fuentes. As early as 1962 the author publishes Aura, a short novel that includes many traditional gothic features. Aura can be easily found in English translation (Manchester University Press) as well as in bilingual edition (Macmillan: Farrar, Strauss & Giroux). The narrative tells the story of Felipe Montero, a young historian who’s hired to organise and complete the memoirs of a dead gene

Parodying Poe Thumbnail

Parodying Poe

Posted by Glennis Byron on November 18, 2011 in Blog, News tagged with , ,

To add to Dale's post about Poe resources, if you are working on Poe there's also the Edgar Allan Poe Digital Collection at the Harry Ransom Centre, University of Texas, Austin. There is also the Poe Project, which aims to provide new ways to think about and interact with Poe - this is mainly, I think for teachers of school children, but the Digital collection is very useful. Here's a sample, pages from a parody of Poe's 'The Raven' called 'The Vulture: An Ornithological Study', taken from Graham's Magazine of 1853:

Paul Féval’s La Ville Vampire Thumbnail

Paul Féval’s La Ville Vampire

Posted by Glennis Byron on October 18, 2010 in Blog tagged with , , , , ,

I just finished Vampire City last night, Brian Stableford’s translation/adaptation(?) of Paul Féval’s La Ville Vampire. It’s the first book by Féval I’ve read, and I was prompted to buy it after learning that the heroine of this tale is Ann Radcliffe herself: the book is at least a vague precursor of the literary monster mash-ups of today: Ann Radcliffe, Vampire Hunter. Féval, a French novelist, and considered one of the fathers of modern ...