London

CFP: The Uncanny in Language, Literature and Culture Thumbnail

CFP: The Uncanny in Language, Literature and Culture

Posted by Fanny Lacôte on March 29, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

International Conference 19 August 2017 – London, UK organised by Interdisciplinary Research Foundation and London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research http://uncanny.irf-network.org/ The twentieth-century literature and culture tended to explore and to celebrate subjectivity. But this tendency did not mean the turn to the self, but beyond the self, or as Charles Taylor puts it, “to a fragmentation of experience which calls our ordinary notions of identity into question”.  In his attempts to define the uncanny Freud asserted that it is undoubtedly related to what is frightening

‘The Haunted House in French Culture’, London 19 May Thumbnail

‘The Haunted House in French Culture’, London 19 May

Posted by Matt Foley on April 22, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , ,

The Haunted House in French Culture 19 May 2016 Room 243, vcialis 40mg Senate House, buy cialis University of London Malet Street, London WC1 7HU   The haunted house is a significant Gothic motif in literature, film and television. It can be understood as the domestication of the Gothic, as the older concept of the aristocratic ancestral home becomes more diluted, more nuanced, by the rise of the bourgeois family. The haunted house comes to represent a variety of thematic concepts: it can be read as revealing the fault lines of gender, sexuality and class, as symbolic of hidden trau

Sara Wasson, Urban Gothic of the Second World War: Dark London Thumbnail

Sara Wasson, Urban Gothic of the Second World War: Dark London

Posted by Honora Wilson on May 17, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

The word Gothic evokes horrifying images of ruined castles, vengeful ghosts, murderous maniacs and helplessly imprisoned heroines. But in Sara Wasson’s fine study, Urban Gothic of the Second World War: Dark London, there is no crumbling house of Usher, no supernatural forces and no madmen kidnapping damsels...

The Creature’s Speech: Never mind Colin Firth, Frankenstein’s Creature finally finds his voice at The National Thumbnail

The Creature’s Speech: Never mind Colin Firth, Frankenstein’s Creature finally finds his voice at The National

Posted by Sharon Deans on February 25, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , ,

‘I will not torture you.  I will reason with you.  Isn’t that what we do?  Have a dialogue?’ So says the Creature to an astounded and fearful Victor in playwright Nick Dear’s stunning, conceptual adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein currently playing at the National Theatre in London.  And what a dialogue it is, with the two protagonists duelling and debating throughout.  Nick Dear’s intention with this piece was to give the Creature his voice back: although Mary Shelley had given him a voice, most adaptations have not, and so the play opens from the Creature’s poin

Sherlock Thumbnail

Sherlock

Posted by Liam Dodds on January 07, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

“The world’s favourite detective has emerged from the fog, this is Sherlock for a new generation”.

Shane MacGowan’s Gothic London Thumbnail

Shane MacGowan’s Gothic London

Posted by Tom Paskins on November 23, 2010 in Blog tagged with , , , ,

With Christmas practically just around the corner, you know it isn't going to be long before you can't listen to the radio without hearing The Pogues along with the late Kirst Maccoll sing Fairytale of New York. This song in spite of its ...