literature

Gothic Literary Aesthetic II (from Gothic MOOC) Thumbnail

Gothic Literary Aesthetic II (from Gothic MOOC)

Posted by Peter Lindfield on July 16, 2016 in Peter Lindfield tagged with , , , , ,

Hello, and welcome to the videos from the third week of our MOOC, The Gothic Revival, 1700–1850: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. We’ve got plenty of material in store for you, in a session devoted to an exploration of the Gothic literary aesthetic beyond the example of The Castle of Otranto.  In these videos we will take you through some of the aesthetic foundations of early Gothic writing, including an account of the distinctions between horror and terror, the importance of Shakespeare to the Gothic aesthetic, and the culmination of the so-called ‘first wave’ of Gothic writing

Female Gothic, Post-Colonialism, and The Icarus Girl Thumbnail

Female Gothic, Post-Colonialism, and The Icarus Girl

Posted by Madelyn Schoonover on April 01, 2016 in Madelyn Schoonover tagged with , , , , ,

Since the Whig politician Horace Walpole first penned The Castle of Otranto in 1764, Gothic authors have been objecting to rigid social and political conventions and structures, questioning authority in its sundry forms from tyrannical patriarch to power-hungry Prioress. In stories of terror and intrigue such as Matthew Lewis’ The Monk (1796), readers enter an uncanny literary universe of the hyperreal; places where ghosts of past traumas are literal and rationality will not always save the heroes. As Andrew Smith and William Hughes note, the Gothic is a “celebration of the irrational,

The lamb must learn to run with the tigers; La Belle et la Bête and The Tiger’s Bride Thumbnail

The lamb must learn to run with the tigers; La Belle et la Bête and The Tiger’s Bride

Posted by Stephanie Gallon on November 09, 2015 in Stephanie Gallon tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

In my last post, I discussed the surrealist French film La Belle et la Bête, written and directed in 1946 by Jean Cocteau. Despite being a mainstream success and a critical darling in France and more recently lauded for its ‘surreal elegance’ (Hogan, 1997: 90), the film was received in Surrealist circles as a poor imitation of the artistic movement. Cocteau denied being a Surrealist, despite his works often being cited as Surrealist cinema. La Belle et la Bête is not purely surrealism; it is surrealism made Gothic and traditional. Angela Carter’s short story The Tiger’s Bride seem

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946) Thumbnail

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946)

Posted by Stephanie Gallon on October 26, 2015 in Blog, Stephanie Gallon tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The term ‘surréaliste’, or surrealist, was coined by Guillaume Apollinaire in 1917 in response to Jean Cocteau’s ballet Parade. It meant to Apollinaire ‘an attempt to reach beyond the limits of the “real”’ (Baldick, 2008: 324). In looser terms, surrealist is to describe something as imaginative but bizarre. Much of Cocteau’s 1946 film La Belle et la Bête fits in to this definition. The palace itself is an isolated and dark place, very much fitting in to the Gothic tradition. There are disembodied hands to act as servants though Belle calls them ‘invisible’. They hold t

CfP: Haunted Europe, Leiden University, 9-10 June 2016 Thumbnail

CfP: Haunted Europe, Leiden University, 9-10 June 2016

Posted by Matt Foley on August 06, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , ,

Call for Papers Haunted Europe:  Continental Connections in English-Language Gothic Writing, Film and New Media 9 - 10 June 2016. Leiden University, The Netherlands   Keynote speakers: Professor Robert Miles (University of Victoria) Professor Roger Luckhurst (Birkbeck – University of London) Professor Tanya Krzywinska (Falmouth University) Lesley Megahey (director of the BBC film Schalken, the Painter)   The Leiden Research Institute for the Arts in Society (LUCAS) invites proposals for papers that address continental connections in English-Language Gothic Writing, Film and New Med

CFP: The Contemporary Bad Guy, October 31, St Andrews Thumbnail

CFP: The Contemporary Bad Guy, October 31, St Andrews

Posted by Matt Foley on August 05, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , , , , , , , ,

The Contemporary Bad Guy on October 31,  2015 “Female violence is a specific brand of ferocity. It’s invasive. A girlfight is all teeth and hair, spit and nails — a much more fearsome thing to watch than two dudes clobbering each other. And the mental violence is positively gory. Women entwine.” Gillian Flynn As Terry Eagleton notes in his essay On Evil: “Evil, like religious fundamentalism, is among other things a nostalgia for an older, simpler civilisation, in which there were certitudes like damnation and salvation, and you knew where you stood… In a curious sense, evil i

Review: Reading Vampire Gothic Through Blood: Bloodlines Thumbnail

Review: Reading Vampire Gothic Through Blood: Bloodlines

Posted by Alexandra Campbell on November 28, 2014 in Alexandra Campbell, Blog tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

Reading Vampire Gothic Through Blood: Bloodlines By Aspasia Stephanou   Across the past two decades the classic Gothic figure of the Vampire has – despite their iconic solitary, elusive and secretive nature – hardly been out of the public eye since the release of Francis Ford Coppola's Bram Stoker's Dracula in 1992. Since the early 1990s, Vampires of all shapes and leather-clad sizes have hit our small and big screens with varying levels of cult-pop impact: Interview with A Vampire (1994); Buffy the Vampire Slayer (Series, 1997-2003); Blade Trilogy (1998-2004); Ultraviolet  (S

The Current State of Experimental Gothic: Part One Thumbnail

The Current State of Experimental Gothic: Part One

Posted by Neil McRobert on November 09, 2014 in Blog, Guest Blog, News tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

Since the death of David Foster Wallace in 2008, there has been much discussion of the status of experimentation in contemporary literature. Zadie Smith’s article, “Two Paths for the Novel”, was published in the same year and kindled a polarising debate over whether the experimental fiction is thriving or has been thoroughly beaten to death.[i] Some critics bemoan the loss of novelistic innovation, as if David Foster Wallace took the sacred art of experimental prose with him into oblivion. The cause is not helped by the recent trajectory of that totemic indicator of middlebrow literary c

Waking the (un)dead: Myths, monsters, and remaking a classic text Thumbnail

Waking the (un)dead: Myths, monsters, and remaking a classic text

Posted by Lynn Shepherd on October 21, 2014 in Blog, Lynn Shepherd tagged with , , , , , , ,

When I published Murder at Mansfield Park in 2010 I did an interview about it on BBC radio, and I remember the almost breathless awe in the interviewer’s voice as she said, “This is your first novel, and you’re trying to write like Jane Austen?” Amazing though it may sound, that was the first time that it really came home to me what a mountainous task I’d set myself. Though I’d been under no illusions about how some readers might react to the idea of turning an Austen masterpiece into a murder mystery – there will always be some people who regard classic texts as sacred cow

Vampires and Victorians: Science and superstition in 19th-century London Thumbnail

Vampires and Victorians: Science and superstition in 19th-century London

Posted by Lynn Shepherd on October 07, 2014 in Blog, Lynn Shepherd tagged with , , , , , , ,

When it comes to timing, I’ve had two fantastic strokes of luck as a novelist. The first was that I decided to bring my Dickens-related book, Tom-All-Alone’s, to a close at the end of November 1850. Why was that lucky? Because it meant that when I chose to follow that novel with a sequel about the Shelleys I had eight or nine precious weeks before Mary Shelley’s death on February 1st 1851, so one of my main protagonists was still alive to play a role in the story. And from that followed the second stroke of luck, because 1851 was, of course, the year of the Great Exhibition. And what bet