horror

Review: Horror: A Literary History Thumbnail

Review: Horror: A Literary History

Posted by Carly Stevenson on January 21, 2017 in Blog, Carly Stevenson, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

According to Reyes, the ‘transmedial, transhistorical and marketable genre’ (p.8) of horror is ‘largely defined by its affective pretences’ (p.7). That is to say, horror is inextricably bound up with the sense of disgust, fear and shock experienced by the reader. This is where horror diverges from its bedfellow terror. As the first two chapters of this book elucidate, the terms horror and terror were used interchangeably in seminal Gothic documents such as Edmund Burke’s A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, Anna Laetitia Aikin’s ‘On

Gothic Literary Aesthetic II (from Gothic MOOC) Thumbnail

Gothic Literary Aesthetic II (from Gothic MOOC)

Posted by Peter Lindfield on July 16, 2016 in Peter Lindfield tagged with , , , , ,

Hello, and welcome to the videos from the third week of our MOOC, The Gothic Revival, 1700–1850: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. We’ve got plenty of material in store for you, in a session devoted to an exploration of the Gothic literary aesthetic beyond the example of The Castle of Otranto.  In these videos we will take you through some of the aesthetic foundations of early Gothic writing, including an account of the distinctions between horror and terror, the importance of Shakespeare to the Gothic aesthetic, and the culmination of the so-called ‘first wave’ of Gothic writing

Review: ‘Reimagining the Gothic: Monsters and Monstrosities’ symposium, 6th May 2016 Thumbnail

Review: ‘Reimagining the Gothic: Monsters and Monstrosities’ symposium, 6th May 2016

Posted by Amy Bride on May 19, 2016 in Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

‘Monster’ is a jointly allusive and ubiquitous term. For gothic scholars, what constitutes monstrosity is a vast and varied spectrum of physical abnormality, genetic hybridity, moral corruption, and everything in between. Yet for almost 200 years perceptions of the gothic monster in the popular imagination have been dominated by Mary Shelley and her life-creating doctor who has transcended literary boundaries to become a cultural icon in his own right. The task of re-analysing the gothic monster, both in conversation and contrast with Shelley’s creation, was that addressed by the ‘

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon Thumbnail

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon

Posted by Benjamin E. Noad on May 09, 2016 in Ben Noad, Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , , ,

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon edited by Linnie Blake and Xavier Aldana Reyes (New York and London: I. B. Tauris & Co., 2016) This recent edited collection channels a political urgency that beckons further attention to the stylistics, nuances and cultural significance of global horror cinema. The essays it contains are inspired, richly detailed and are, in a word that may do justice to the entirety of the collection as a whole, haunting. The most immediate effect of this inquiry is realised in Blake and Reyes’s introducti

Where the Camera can not Take Us: Sounding the Unseeable in Game of Thrones. Thumbnail

Where the Camera can not Take Us: Sounding the Unseeable in Game of Thrones.

Posted by Danielle Hancock on May 06, 2016 in Danielle Hancock, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , , ,

  Warning: This blog-post contains spoilers for Game of Thrones, Season 6.   Daenerys Targaryen’s dragons are rough to the touch. The plains of Winterfell are swept with fast, sharp winds. A human skull smashes with the same wet burst as a watermelon. I learnt these things, and many more, from listening to Game of Thrones. Mostly, we tend to watch Game of Thrones, and with good reason. The show seldom shies away from graphic detail. Gouged eyes, decapitation, burning children, full frontal nudity  - in the face of all these and more the camera’s gaze never wavers. Indee

The Prosthetic Work of Horror: by Kate Griffiths Thumbnail

The Prosthetic Work of Horror: by Kate Griffiths

Posted by Matt Foley on February 05, 2016 in Blog, Guest Blog tagged with , , , , ,

The Prosthetic Work of Horror A Guest Blog by make-up artist Kate Griffiths There are some graphic images in this post, but they are all make-ups!   So I’ve been asked to write a blog for you guys and, drugs although I write a regular blog for my own site letting readers know what I’ve been up to, I have no idea what you’d like to see on here so I’m just going to go ahead and introduce myself, tell you a little bit of what I do for a living and we’ll take it from there, but first, just to whet your appetite, here’s something I made in my kitchen earlier just for a bit o

CFP: ‘Werewolves: Studies in Transformations’ Thumbnail

CFP: ‘Werewolves: Studies in Transformations’

Posted by Kaja Franck on September 30, 2015 in Guest Blog tagged with , , , , ,

I'm delighted to post a CFP for a special issue of Revenant, a journal dedicated to the supernatural. ‘Revenant: Critical and Creative Studies of the Supernatural’ is a peer-reviewed, online journal looking at the supernatural, the uncanny and the weird. Revenant is now accepting articles, creative writing pieces and book, film, game, event or art reviews for a themed issue on werewolves (due Autumn 2016), guest edited by Dr Janine Hatter and Kaja Franck. Werewolves have been a consistent, if side-lined, aspect of supernatural studies. From medieval and Early Modern poetry, through the

CALL FOR PAPERS: Fashion and Horror Collection Thumbnail

CALL FOR PAPERS: Fashion and Horror Collection

Posted by Matt Foley on September 01, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , , , ,

This is a call for proposals for chapters to comprise a potential new publication, which has had strong interest from Bloomsbury. Editors of this volume are Dr. Julia Petrov, salve Alberta College of Art and Design, Canada and Dr. Gudrun D. Whitehead, University of Iceland. Overview  Recently, academic attention has turned to exploring the links between popular culture and dress. Thematic approaches to sub-cultural dress have included Gothic: Dark Glamour (Steele and Park 2008), Punk: Chaos to Couture (Bolton et al 2013). The role of media in fashion dissemination and reception

CFP: “Expanding the Scope of Horror” Thumbnail

CFP: “Expanding the Scope of Horror”

Posted by Matt Foley on July 31, 2015 in Blog tagged with ,

A special journal issue of Interdisciplinary Humanities Humanities Education and Research Association cuevae@uhd.edu Fall 2016: Expanding the Scope of Horror Guest Editors: Edmund Cueva and William Novak The proposed set of essays and book reviews would have as its main objective to offer a new practical model for research and analysis as an alternative to the rigid and dichotomous methodologies often used in investigations on horror. Currently, most of the scholarship either tends to situate horror on the fringe of academic research and therefore not worthy of attention. Or,

The Grotesque Orgasm: Gothic’s Dirtiest Trick. Thumbnail

The Grotesque Orgasm: Gothic’s Dirtiest Trick.

Posted by Danielle Hancock on June 01, 2015 in Blog, Danielle Hancock tagged with , , , , , ,

Note: This post contains sexually explicit language.   “The grotesque orgasm” is a phrase that’s been lurking in my mind for a long time - since some friends and myself admitted to getting hot under the collar during parts of Brett Easton Ellis' American Psycho, only to be bodily horrified at the next line. Simply, American Psycho constituted  some of the most bluntly provocative literature we'd ever read, with the unhappiest endings we’d ever experienced. Let me give you an example: [here imagine the antics of an explicit 2.5 page consensual three-person sex scene, build