H.P. Lovecraft

Review: Datlow (ed.) Lovecraft’s Monsters (San Francisco: Tachyon, 2014) Thumbnail

Review: Datlow (ed.) Lovecraft’s Monsters (San Francisco: Tachyon, 2014)

Posted by Chloe Buckley on August 23, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , ,

The Weird Monster and Popular Culture From the vaults of cult fiction and role-playing manuals, the monsters of H.P. Lovecraft’s Weird fiction are becoming increasingly visible in popular culture, often recognized through the metonym of the tentacle. The rise of the tentacle, and of Lovecraft's fiction more generally, has been facilitated by Cthulhu, the most (in)famous of Lovecraft's monsters and the one whose name has come to be associated with the “mythos” Lovecraft inaugurated through his fiction. Before I move on to think about the volume of short stories - Lovecraft's Mon

Review: Lancaster University 5th Annual Contemporary Gothic Study Day Thumbnail

Review: Lancaster University 5th Annual Contemporary Gothic Study Day

Posted by Neal Kirk on June 19, 2015 in Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

On May 15 2015, Lancaster University Department of English and Creative Writing held their fifth annual Contemporary Gothic Study Day. Known as one of the highlights of the academic calendar for gothic scholarship in the Northwest of England it was the best of the three I have attended. An audience of up to nearly forty included Lancaster University English MA students and new PhD candidates from as far afield as Italy. Lancaster’s Dr. Catherine Spooner (Fashioning Gothic Bodies (2004), Contemporary Gothic (2006)), welcomed everybody and introduced the keynote speaker, Dr. Claire Nally. D

Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear Thumbnail

Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear

Posted by Will Connor on July 29, 2014 in Blog, Will Connor tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

          H. P. Lovecraft is arguably one of the most important writers of the previous century and remains so today. His works, spanning horror, science fiction, and fantasy, have influenced a large number of prominent authors following fellow writer and fan August Derleth’s adamant insistence that Lovecraft’s works be preserved and widely published. As a result, many tributes, expansions, and interpretations of Lovecraft’s works have been produced in increasing numbers each year to date. Literature is not the only form of media producing Lovecraftian works, either, with the most c

Impossible Spaces, Impossible Authors Thumbnail

Impossible Spaces, Impossible Authors

Posted by jessicageorge on October 30, 2013 in Guest Blog, Jessica George tagged with ,

For my last Impossible Spaces blog tour post this month, I’m going to go back to something Tracy Fahey touched on in one of her Gothic Intersections posts: the idea of dissolving boundaries between selves, and particularly authorial selves.

Impossible Spaces: Innsmouth Thumbnail

Impossible Spaces: Innsmouth

Posted by jessicageorge on October 09, 2013 in Guest Blog, Jessica George tagged with ,

As this month’s Impossible Spaces blogger, I’m going to discuss the use of place—and of the transitions and spaces between places—in some of the Gothic fictions that interest me most. In the first of my blog tour posts, I talk about a literary place to which there is rather more than first meets the eye: H. P. Lovecraft’s fictional New England port, Innsmouth.

Review: The Classic Horror Stories of H.P. Lovecraft, ed. Roger Luckhurst Thumbnail

Review: The Classic Horror Stories of H.P. Lovecraft, ed. Roger Luckhurst

Posted by James Campbell on April 08, 2013 in Reviews tagged with , , , ,

Lovecraft, H.P.  The Classic Horror Stories.  Ed. Roger Luckhurst.  Oxford University Press.  9 May 2013.  Hardback / Kindle. (Since this review refers to the Kindle e-book edition, I apologise in advance for the lack of page references.) Out this May from Oxford University Press, The Classic Horror Stories of H.P. Lovecraft – edited by Roger Luckhurst of Birkbeck College, University of London – collects nine of the most significant entries in Lovecraft’s ‘Cthulhu Mythos.’  By equating ‘classic’ with ‘Cthulhu’ the book takes a firm but justifiable stance towards t

Ramsey Campbell interviewed by David McWilliam Thumbnail

Ramsey Campbell interviewed by David McWilliam

Posted by David McWilliam on September 24, 2012 in Interviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Just in my own stuff I’ve moved from imitating Lovecraft to a more contemporary style of psychological horror (a trajectory Robert Bloch’s career also described) and tried to bring the supernatural tale up to my own date (as Fritz Leiber, another author influenced early in his career by HPL, magnificently did). Every so often I make a bid to scale the heights of awe that Blackwood and Machen’s greatest tales occupy. And maybe I’ve even discovered my own little niche in the genre, which I’d call comedy of paranoia. To sum up, I haven’t discovered the limits of the field, and I doubt I will.

HPLHS’s The Whisperer in Darkness Thumbnail

HPLHS’s The Whisperer in Darkness

Posted by Glennis Byron on March 24, 2011 in News tagged with , ,

The European premiere of the H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society's production of The Whisperer in Darkness is coming Friday, 1 April 2011 at the Belfast Horror Film Festival...