gothic romance

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946) Thumbnail

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946)

Posted by Stephanie Gallon on October 26, 2015 in Blog, Stephanie Gallon tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The term ‘surréaliste’, or surrealist, was coined by Guillaume Apollinaire in 1917 in response to Jean Cocteau’s ballet Parade. It meant to Apollinaire ‘an attempt to reach beyond the limits of the “real”’ (Baldick, 2008: 324). In looser terms, surrealist is to describe something as imaginative but bizarre. Much of Cocteau’s 1946 film La Belle et la Bête fits in to this definition. The palace itself is an isolated and dark place, very much fitting in to the Gothic tradition. There are disembodied hands to act as servants though Belle calls them ‘invisible’. They hold t

An Interview with New York Times Bestselling Author Gail Carriger Thumbnail

An Interview with New York Times Bestselling Author Gail Carriger

Posted by Aspasia Stephanou on September 29, 2010 in Interviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

October 2009 saw the publication of Soulless, the first of The Parasol Protectorate Books and Gail Carriger's debut novel. It was fresh, witty, and comic. It opened up a world populated with elegant vampires, werewolves, steampunk aesthetics and a heroine who had a taste for good tea and parasols. To paraphrase Jane Austen, "No one who had ever seen Alexia Tarabotti in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be an heroine." Alexia Tarabotti, like Catherine Morland in Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, is indeed a gothic heroine, and her adventures can be followed in Changeless (March, 2010)