gender

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience Thumbnail

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on February 07, 2015 in Blog, Evan Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Gothic became a self-parodying genre very quickly: Jane Austen wrote the self-reflexive Northanger Abbey in 1798, though it did not see publication for nearly twenty years after that. Two hundred years later, the gothic has expanded and adapted, and a mocking inter-textual awareness is a key quality for the popularity of the genre. The audience for this fiction has long been perceived as skewing feminine, as is recognized and critiqued in Austen’s work. The modern southern gothic of True Blood (2007-2014), and American gothic Supernatural (2005-ongoing), also recognize a majority female fan

Gothic sexualities: female necrophilia Thumbnail

Gothic sexualities: female necrophilia

Posted by Lena Wånggren on May 10, 2013 in Guest Blog, Lena Wånggren tagged with , , , ,

If, as Fred Botting has posited, the gothic is characterised by transgression as well as excess, then necrophilia might be one of the most gothic sexual practices. Transgressing the bounds of reality and possibility, Botting states, gothic narratives may 'subvert rational codes of understanding' and thus 'blurring definitions of reason and morality' (6). Often considered the most horrible or unspeakable of sexual aberrations, necrophilia – a sexual attraction to corpses – could arguably be considered the ultimate transgression between life and death. Cast as a kind of gothic sexuality, necrophilia might work to question established social orders and norms. And, as I hope to sketch out in this post, female necrophilia might work also as a specifically gendered transgression.

Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet, The Poetics and Politics of the American Gothic. Gender and Slavery in Nineteeth-Century American Literature Thumbnail

Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet, The Poetics and Politics of the American Gothic. Gender and Slavery in Nineteeth-Century American Literature

Posted by Maria Parrino on January 15, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , ,

This book focuses on one aspect of American Gothic literature that Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet believes has been overlooked: judgement. Underlining the need to consider the genre as a performative rather than an objective critical category ...