film

Review: Danel Olson’s Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth: Studies in the Horror Film Thumbnail

Review: Danel Olson’s Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth: Studies in the Horror Film

Posted by Timothy Jones on January 11, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth: Studies in the Horror Film, edited by Danel Olson. Publisher: Centipede Press (2016). ISBN 978 1 61347 101 2 (paperback).   Review by Ann Davies   Danel Olson’s new edited volume offers a compendium on the two Spanish-language horror/fantasy classics by Guillermo del Toro, The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth. Beautifully produced, with a wealth of illustrations, it also contains not only academic essays on the two films but interviews with a good range of cast and crew involved in the two prod

James Whale season at the Bo’ness Hippodrome Thumbnail

James Whale season at the Bo’ness Hippodrome

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 13, 2016 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

In the run up to Halloween the Hippodrome will present three classic horror films directed by the legendary British director James Whale, each one introduced by a special guest from the Gothic studies staff at the University of Stirling.  The original and best ‘Frankenstein’ (1931), featuring a chilling Boris Karloff as the Monster kicks off the season on Saturday 15th October at 2.30pm.  Next up is ‘The Invisible Man’ (1933) Sunday 23rd October 2.30pm – the film that made Claude Rains a star despite only being visible at the end (spoiler alert!).  The season concludes with the fr

New titles in Auteur Press’ _Devil’s Advocates_ series Thumbnail

New titles in Auteur Press’ _Devil’s Advocates_ series

Posted by Matt Foley on February 09, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , , ,

Suspiria (Devil’s Advocates) Alexandra Heller-Nicholas Paperback / Price: £9.99 / ISBN: 978-0-9932384-7-5 Extent: 110pp / Publication: February 2016 As one of the most globally recognisable instances of 20th century Eurohorror, Dario Argento’s Suspiria (1976) is poetic, chaotic and intriguing. The cult reputation of Argento’s baroque nightmare is reflected in the critical praise it continues to receive 40 years after its original release, and it appears regularly on lists of the greatest horror films ever. For fans and critics alike, Suspiria is as mesmerising as it is impe

The Prosthetic Work of Horror: by Kate Griffiths Thumbnail

The Prosthetic Work of Horror: by Kate Griffiths

Posted by Matt Foley on February 05, 2016 in Blog, Guest Blog tagged with , , , , ,

The Prosthetic Work of Horror A Guest Blog by make-up artist Kate Griffiths There are some graphic images in this post, physician but they are all make-ups!   So I’ve been asked to write a blog for you guys and, drugs although I write a regular blog for my own site letting readers know what I’ve been up to, I have no idea what you’d like to see on here so I’m just going to go ahead and introduce myself, tell you a little bit of what I do for a living and we’ll take it from there, but first, just to whet your appetite, here’s something I made in my kitchen earlier just fo

The lamb must learn to run with the tigers; La Belle et la Bête and The Tiger’s Bride Thumbnail

The lamb must learn to run with the tigers; La Belle et la Bête and The Tiger’s Bride

Posted by Stephanie Gallon on November 09, 2015 in Stephanie Gallon tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

In my last post, I discussed the surrealist French film La Belle et la Bête, written and directed in 1946 by Jean Cocteau. Despite being a mainstream success and a critical darling in France and more recently lauded for its ‘surreal elegance’ (Hogan, 1997: 90), the film was received in Surrealist circles as a poor imitation of the artistic movement. Cocteau denied being a Surrealist, despite his works often being cited as Surrealist cinema. La Belle et la Bête is not purely surrealism; it is surrealism made Gothic and traditional. Angela Carter’s short story The Tiger’s Bride seem

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946) Thumbnail

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946)

Posted by Stephanie Gallon on October 26, 2015 in Blog, Stephanie Gallon tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The term ‘surréaliste’, or surrealist, was coined by Guillaume Apollinaire in 1917 in response to Jean Cocteau’s ballet Parade. It meant to Apollinaire ‘an attempt to reach beyond the limits of the “real”’ (Baldick, 2008: 324). In looser terms, surrealist is to describe something as imaginative but bizarre. Much of Cocteau’s 1946 film La Belle et la Bête fits in to this definition. The palace itself is an isolated and dark place, very much fitting in to the Gothic tradition. There are disembodied hands to act as servants though Belle calls them ‘invisible’. They hold t

CfP: Haunted Europe, Leiden University, 9-10 June 2016 Thumbnail

CfP: Haunted Europe, Leiden University, 9-10 June 2016

Posted by Matt Foley on August 06, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , ,

Call for Papers Haunted Europe:  Continental Connections in English-Language Gothic Writing, ambulance Film and New Media 9 - 10 June 2016. Leiden University, The Netherlands   Keynote speakers: Professor Robert Miles (University of Victoria) Professor Roger Luckhurst (Birkbeck – University of London) Professor Tanya Krzywinska (Falmouth University) Lesley Megahey (director of the BBC film Schalken, the Painter)   The Leiden Research Institute for the Arts in Society (LUCAS) invites proposals for papers that address continental connections in English-Language Gothic Writing, Film an

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) Thumbnail

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014)

Posted by Matt Foley on June 24, 2015 in Blog, Carly Stevenson, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) By Carly Stevenson (University of Sheffield)   This debut from British-born, click Iranian-American writer-director Ana Lily Amirpour is at once nostalgic and innovative in its approach to the ever-popular (and some might say oversaturated) vampire motif. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night assimilates a wealth of classic horror imagery: the jerky body movements and monochromatic aesthetic give the film a surreal quality reminiscent of Nosferatu and The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari. And yet, troche this nod to early European horror contrasts w

Review of ‘Selling the Splat Pack: The DVD Revolution and the American Horror Film’, by Mark Bernard. Thumbnail

Review of ‘Selling the Splat Pack: The DVD Revolution and the American Horror Film’, by Mark Bernard.

Posted by Glenn Ward on September 22, 2014 in Glenn Ward, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Mark Bernard Selling the Splat Pack: The DVD Revolution and the American Horror Film Edinburgh University Press, 2014 Reviewed by Glenn Ward An eminent horror film critic once told me that many low-budget, high-gore contemporary American genre movies look as if they are “made by assholes”. I think he meant that the films, like many of their grating protagonists, were brash, crude and motivated by a juvenile wish to offend; to that extent, the on-screen Twenty-Something irritants might sometimes be projections of the filmmaker’s personality. Not wanting to get into a leng

The Conjuring opens in the US to positive reviews Thumbnail

The Conjuring opens in the US to positive reviews

Posted by Matt Foley on July 19, 2013 in News tagged with , ,

James Wan's (Saw) latest feature film The Conjuring has been greeted by a number of complimentary reviews on its US release, including being touted as the best horror film of the year by the San Francisco Chronicle. While the praise has not been universally gushing, for example see the more measured review in The Wall Street Journal, the 1970's-set film has been praised for its bold use of sound and, in particular, the sheer number of 'jump out of your seat' moments that Wan has conjured. The picture is set for a UK release early next month and has been said to be derivative of its antec