film

German Expressionist Cinema: The Modern Gothic and The Uncanny Double Thumbnail

German Expressionist Cinema: The Modern Gothic and The Uncanny Double

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 09, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

  By Jamie Wood   German Expressionist cinema exudes Gothic revival motifs: fairytale motifs, angular exteriors, claustrophobic interiors’[1] as well as for humanoids, vampires, automata, doubles, including other creatures hovering between man and beast and man and machine and living in the twilight zone of power and madness.’[2] In Thomas Elsaesser’s Weimar Cinema and After: Germany’s Historical Imaginary, ‘Weimar cinema came to epitomize a country: ‘twentieth-century Germany, uneasy with itself and troubled by a modernity that was to bring yet more appallin

Verónica: Something horrible for the weekend Thumbnail

Verónica: Something horrible for the weekend

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 05, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

  Just a note to say that Stirling Gothicist Professor Ann Davies will be introducing Verónica, the latest film by Paco Plaza ([REC]), to be screened in both Edinburgh and Glasgow as part of the Edinburgh Spanish Film Festival this weekend. Edinburgh: Filmhouse, Lothian Road, Edinburgh, Sunday 7 October 20:20 Glasgow: Glasgow Film Theatre, Rose St, Glasgow, Monday 15 October 20:15   For further details: https://www.edinburghspanishfilmfestival.com/en/films/veronica/ https://www.ed.ac.uk/files/atoms/files/esff_programme_2018.pdf  

The “Post Racial Lie” and Horror Movie Expectations in Get Out Thumbnail

The “Post Racial Lie” and Horror Movie Expectations in Get Out

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 03, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

By Sarah Treanor   Get Out (2017) has been hailed by the media as “the satirical horror movie we’ve been waiting for” (Edelstein). The fact that we’ve been waiting for it implies not only that it is something we have not seen before, but also that it has something culturally and socially necessary to say. Peele has said that he “wrote the movie primarily during the post racial lie” and, rather than perpetuate this lie, Get Out gives us the idea that “the underside of culture is blood, torture, death and horror” (Jameson, 57). This blog will discuss how the cultur

Cinema’s First Vampires: Theodor and Leo Wharton’s The Mysteries of Myra and Alexander Korda’s Mágia Thumbnail

Cinema’s First Vampires: Theodor and Leo Wharton’s The Mysteries of Myra and Alexander Korda’s Mágia

Posted by Dr David Annwn Jones on February 20, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

Vampire: ‘a preternatural being of malignant nature (in the original and usual form of the belief, a re-animated corpse), supposed to seek nourishment, or do harm, by sucking the blood of sleeping persons; a  man or woman abnormally endowed with similar habits.’ OED In searching for the cinema’s first vampires, it is wise to go back to basics. Though we might identify unnatural longevity, castles, bats and an aversion to sunlight and stakes with vampirism, it is clear that the consumption of blood is a decisive factor yet it is significant that the  above description stops short of

Review: Danel Olson’s Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth: Studies in the Horror Film Thumbnail

Review: Danel Olson’s Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth: Studies in the Horror Film

Posted by Timothy Jones on January 11, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth: Studies in the Horror Film, edited by Danel Olson. Publisher: Centipede Press (2016). ISBN 978 1 61347 101 2 (paperback).   Review by Ann Davies   Danel Olson’s new edited volume offers a compendium on the two Spanish-language horror/fantasy classics by Guillermo del Toro, The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth. Beautifully produced, with a wealth of illustrations, it also contains not only academic essays on the two films but interviews with a good range of cast and crew involved in the two prod

James Whale season at the Bo’ness Hippodrome Thumbnail

James Whale season at the Bo’ness Hippodrome

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 13, 2016 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

In the run up to Halloween the Hippodrome will present three classic horror films directed by the legendary British director James Whale, each one introduced by a special guest from the Gothic studies staff at the University of Stirling.  The original and best ‘Frankenstein’ (1931), featuring a chilling Boris Karloff as the Monster kicks off the season on Saturday 15th October at 2.30pm.  Next up is ‘The Invisible Man’ (1933) Sunday 23rd October 2.30pm – the film that made Claude Rains a star despite only being visible at the end (spoiler alert!).  The season concludes with the fr

New titles in Auteur Press’ _Devil’s Advocates_ series Thumbnail

New titles in Auteur Press’ _Devil’s Advocates_ series

Posted by Matt Foley on February 09, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , , ,

Suspiria (Devil’s Advocates) Alexandra Heller-Nicholas Paperback / Price: £9.99 / ISBN: 978-0-9932384-7-5 Extent: 110pp / Publication: February 2016 As one of the most globally recognisable instances of 20th century Eurohorror, Dario Argento’s Suspiria (1976) is poetic, chaotic and intriguing. The cult reputation of Argento’s baroque nightmare is reflected in the critical praise it continues to receive 40 years after its original release, and it appears regularly on lists of the greatest horror films ever. For fans and critics alike, Suspiria is as mesmerising as it is impe

The Prosthetic Work of Horror: by Kate Griffiths Thumbnail

The Prosthetic Work of Horror: by Kate Griffiths

Posted by Matt Foley on February 05, 2016 in Blog, Guest Blog tagged with , , , , ,

The Prosthetic Work of Horror A Guest Blog by make-up artist Kate Griffiths There are some graphic images in this post, but they are all make-ups!   So I’ve been asked to write a blog for you guys and, drugs although I write a regular blog for my own site letting readers know what I’ve been up to, I have no idea what you’d like to see on here so I’m just going to go ahead and introduce myself, tell you a little bit of what I do for a living and we’ll take it from there, but first, just to whet your appetite, here’s something I made in my kitchen earlier just for a bit o

The lamb must learn to run with the tigers; La Belle et la Bête and The Tiger’s Bride Thumbnail

The lamb must learn to run with the tigers; La Belle et la Bête and The Tiger’s Bride

Posted by Stephanie Gallon on November 09, 2015 in Stephanie Gallon tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

In my last post, I discussed the surrealist French film La Belle et la Bête, written and directed in 1946 by Jean Cocteau. Despite being a mainstream success and a critical darling in France and more recently lauded for its ‘surreal elegance’ (Hogan, 1997: 90), the film was received in Surrealist circles as a poor imitation of the artistic movement. Cocteau denied being a Surrealist, despite his works often being cited as Surrealist cinema. La Belle et la Bête is not purely surrealism; it is surrealism made Gothic and traditional. Angela Carter’s short story The Tiger’s Bride seem

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946) Thumbnail

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946)

Posted by Stephanie Gallon on October 26, 2015 in Blog, Stephanie Gallon tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The term ‘surréaliste’, or surrealist, was coined by Guillaume Apollinaire in 1917 in response to Jean Cocteau’s ballet Parade. It meant to Apollinaire ‘an attempt to reach beyond the limits of the “real”’ (Baldick, 2008: 324). In looser terms, surrealist is to describe something as imaginative but bizarre. Much of Cocteau’s 1946 film La Belle et la Bête fits in to this definition. The palace itself is an isolated and dark place, very much fitting in to the Gothic tradition. There are disembodied hands to act as servants though Belle calls them ‘invisible’. They hold t