fashion

Dances of the dead: the victims’ ball, Gothic fashion and entertainment of late 18th century France Thumbnail

Dances of the dead: the victims’ ball, Gothic fashion and entertainment of late 18th century France

Posted by Fanny Lacôte on December 15, 2015 in Blog, Fanny Lacôte tagged with , , , , ,

Parisian society after the Terror The 27th of July 1794, a.k.a. 9 Thermidor: Maximilien de Robespierre is arrested. The blade of the guillotine falling on his neck symbolises the end of the Terror in post-revolutionary France. As the prisons open their gates to release the prisoners awaiting the guillotine, French people start to breathe again, and thus, they start to dance in celebration of life. Contemporary accounts relate the bloom of numerous dancing societies. As the Goncourt brothers have written in their history of French society under the Directory, “la France danse”, “Fra

CALL FOR PAPERS: Fashion and Horror Collection Thumbnail

CALL FOR PAPERS: Fashion and Horror Collection

Posted by Matt Foley on September 01, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , , , ,

This is a call for proposals for chapters to comprise a potential new publication, which has had strong interest from Bloomsbury. Editors of this volume are Dr. Julia Petrov, salve Alberta College of Art and Design, Canada and Dr. Gudrun D. Whitehead, University of Iceland. Overview  Recently, academic attention has turned to exploring the links between popular culture and dress. Thematic approaches to sub-cultural dress have included Gothic: Dark Glamour (Steele and Park 2008), Punk: Chaos to Couture (Bolton et al 2013). The role of media in fashion dissemination and reception

Pop-Goth and Post Goth: Two Readings of Two Post-Gothic Fashions Thumbnail

Pop-Goth and Post Goth: Two Readings of Two Post-Gothic Fashions

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on November 22, 2011 in Blog tagged with , , ,

It is doubtless that today’s Gothic fashion sells and sells in a particularly Gothic fashion. The Pop-Gothic culture reflected in the clothes – where the cute is made morbid and the morbid made cute, exemplified by many a headless Hello Kitty – serves to parody late twentieth-century sub-cultural manifestations of Gothic’s manufactured morbidity, its over-reliance upon interpretations of the Gothic as a source of gloom and as a style or social practice suitable for teenage transformation.

Catherine Spooner interviewed by Neil McRobert Thumbnail

Catherine Spooner interviewed by Neil McRobert

Posted by Neil McRobert on February 14, 2011 in Blog, Interviews tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Dr Catherine Spooner is a senior lecturer in English at the University of Lancaster. Specialising in Victorian and contemporary literature she has a specific interest in the Gothic,...

An Interview with New York Times Bestselling Author Gail Carriger Thumbnail

An Interview with New York Times Bestselling Author Gail Carriger

Posted by Aspasia Stephanou on September 29, 2010 in Interviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

October 2009 saw the publication of Soulless, the first of The Parasol Protectorate Books and Gail Carriger's debut novel. It was fresh, witty, and comic. It opened up a world populated with elegant vampires, werewolves, steampunk aesthetics and a heroine who had a taste for good tea and parasols. To paraphrase Jane Austen, "No one who had ever seen Alexia Tarabotti in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be an heroine." Alexia Tarabotti, like Catherine Morland in Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, is indeed a gothic heroine, and her adventures can be followed in Changeless (March, 2010)