book review

Book Review: Rethinking George MacDonald: Contexts and Contemporaries. Thumbnail

Book Review: Rethinking George MacDonald: Contexts and Contemporaries.

Posted by rebeccamclean on May 07, 2013 in Blog, Rebecca McLean, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Book Review: Rethinking George MacDonald: Contexts and Contemporaries. This collection of sixteen essays edited by Christopher MacLachlan, John Patrick Pazdziora and Ginger Stelle sets out to 'look directly at MacDonald the Victorian.' To achieve this the essays are collected into four thematic sections: ‘Belief and Scepticism’, ‘Social Reform and Gender’, ‘Ideals and Nightmares’, and ‘Scotland’. The broad scope of thematic concerns covered in the book allows the reader to gain a strong idea of MacDonald's role and his place beside his Victorian contemporaries.

Jennifer Brown, Cannibalism in Literature and Film, Reviewed by Xavier Aldana Reyes Thumbnail

Jennifer Brown, Cannibalism in Literature and Film, Reviewed by Xavier Aldana Reyes

Posted by Xavier Aldana Reyes on December 11, 2012 in Reviews tagged with , ,

Jennifer Brown, Cannibalism in Literature and Film (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012) Although its title may sound impossibly ambitious, Cannibalism in Literature and Film is actually a very contained and focused volume. Complementing recent histories of the cannibal such as Daniel Diehl and Mark F. Donnelly’s Eat Thy Neighbour (2008) and Jimmy Lee Shreeve’s Cannibals (2009), Jennifer Brown’s book traces the emergence of this myth in the colonial novel and brings it into present times via Italian films and serial killer novels. Her main thesis is clear: the image

“Dark creatures are more fun” – Interview with Joseph Delaney Thumbnail

“Dark creatures are more fun” – Interview with Joseph Delaney

Posted by Chloe Buckley on November 30, 2012 in Interviews, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , ,

“Dark creatures are more fun” Interview with Joseph Delaney / Review of Slither’s Tale Slither’s Tale Publisher: Bodley Head (27 Sep 2012) ISBN-10: 0370332172 ISBN-13: 978-0370332178 Joseph Delaney is the author of the spectacularly successful dark fantasy series, The Wardstone Chronicles, written for children and young adults. The novels tell the story of Tom Ward, a farmer’s son apprenticed to the County ‘Spook’ on his twelfth birthday.  Tom and the ‘Spook’ live and work at the edge of their community, protecting the folk of ‘the County’ from supernatural thr

“Artsy” Zombies: Anthology Recommendations Thumbnail

“Artsy” Zombies: Anthology Recommendations

Posted by Kelly Gardner on November 03, 2012 in Blog tagged with , , , , , , , , , , ,

The walking dead have permeated popular culture to such an extent that no visit to a bookshop or cinema goes without encountering some variation of the contemporary zombie. Zombie literature is inescapable, and the sheer volume available is as daunting as a relentless crowd of flesh-hungry foes. With this in mind, I would like to suggest three zombie themed anthologies that not only act as an introduction to the genre, but also flesh-out various interpretations of the zombie as a multifaceted monster. If you are to read only one zombie book, let it be ZOMBIES: A Compendium of the Livi

Brian Evenson, Altmann’s Tongue Thumbnail

Brian Evenson, Altmann’s Tongue

Posted by Laura Kremmel on November 03, 2011 in Reviews tagged with , , ,

Evenson, Brian. Altmann's Tongue. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2002. 978-0-8032-6744-2. Reviewed by Laura Kremmel, Lehigh University. “He herded them out in the madness of the midday heat, butchered the horses before their eyes.” “Bone Job clawed his way through the smooth wood of the coffin lid, wearing his finger bones to the stubs.” “Having sewn Jerry’s eyelids shut, Hébé found himself at a loss as to how to proceed.” These opening lines from the short stories in Brian Evenson’s Altmann’s Tongue precede tales of broken and twisted families, medit

Review: A Selection of 2011’s Vampires Thumbnail

Review: A Selection of 2011’s Vampires

Posted by Hannah Priest on August 15, 2011 in Dr Hannah Priest, Guest Blog tagged with , , , , ,

By now, most readers will be familiar with the assertions by publishers, writers, bloggers and reviewers that the trend for vampire fiction is coming to an end. However, 2011 has seen a number of new vampire titles so far. Today’s post is a selection of recent offerings. It is not intended to be a definitive comment on the current state of the genre, but rather a review of some vampire titles that are currently gracing the (physical and virtual) bookshop shelves. First up is Scott G. Mariani’s Uprising. First published in 2010 (with Mariani writing under the name Sean McCabe), by Harp

Sue Zlosnik, Patrick McGrath Thumbnail

Sue Zlosnik, Patrick McGrath

Posted by Neil McRobert on July 13, 2011 in Blog, McGrath Symposium, Reviews tagged with , ,

Considering his status in the contemporary Gothic, Patrick McGrath’s fiction has garnered remarkably little scholarly criticism. His was the final entry in Chris Baldick’s 1992 collection of Gothic tales, suggesting that McGrath may well be the future of the genre. In the intervening years...

Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet, The Poetics and Politics of the American Gothic. Gender and Slavery in Nineteeth-Century American Literature Thumbnail

Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet, The Poetics and Politics of the American Gothic. Gender and Slavery in Nineteeth-Century American Literature

Posted by Maria Parrino on January 15, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , ,

This book focuses on one aspect of American Gothic literature that Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet believes has been overlooked: judgement. Underlining the need to consider the genre as a performative rather than an objective critical category ...

Monica Germana, Scottish Women’s Gothic and Fantastic Writing Thumbnail

Monica Germana, Scottish Women’s Gothic and Fantastic Writing

Posted by Neil Syme on January 13, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , ,

Focusing on Gothic and fantastic elements within the literature of Scottish women authors from the late 1970’s onwards, Monica Germana’s new book provides an innovative interpretation of ‘the state of the nation’ in literary terms.

Dongshin Yi, A Genealogy of Cyborgothic: Aesthetics and Ethics in the Age of Posthumanism Thumbnail

Dongshin Yi, A Genealogy of Cyborgothic: Aesthetics and Ethics in the Age of Posthumanism

Posted by Neal Kirk on January 10, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , ,

Avid science fiction readers and/or gothic enthusiasts may have cause to pause at Dongshin Yi’s conjunction of the term 'cyborg' and 'gothic' in his title...