book review

Review: Danel Olson’s Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth: Studies in the Horror Film Thumbnail

Review: Danel Olson’s Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth: Studies in the Horror Film

Posted by Timothy Jones on January 11, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth: Studies in the Horror Film, edited by Danel Olson. Publisher: Centipede Press (2016). ISBN 978 1 61347 101 2 (paperback).   Review by Ann Davies   Danel Olson’s new edited volume offers a compendium on the two Spanish-language horror/fantasy classics by Guillermo del Toro, The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth. Beautifully produced, with a wealth of illustrations, it also contains not only academic essays on the two films but interviews with a good range of cast and crew involved in the two prod

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon Thumbnail

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon

Posted by Benjamin E. Noad on May 09, 2016 in Ben Noad, Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , , ,

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon edited by Linnie Blake and Xavier Aldana Reyes (New York and London: I. B. Tauris & Co., 2016) This recent edited collection channels a political urgency that beckons further attention to the stylistics, nuances and cultural significance of global horror cinema. The essays it contains are inspired, richly detailed and are, in a word that may do justice to the entirety of the collection as a whole, haunting. The most immediate effect of this inquiry is realised in Blake and Reyes’s introducti

Gaston de Blondeville – Review Thumbnail

Gaston de Blondeville – Review

Posted by Holly Hirst on February 05, 2016 in Blog, Holly Hirst, Reviews tagged with , , ,

  Gaston de Blondeville (1826) was the last of Radcliffe’s novels and remains, arguably,  the least famous.  It was allowed to slip quietly and quickly into obscurity at the time and has never since emerged. It is not hard to see why. The lengthy descriptions of natural situations in her earlier work, however they may pall on the modern reader, were regarded by many of her contemporaries as the apotheosis of the pathetic art of producing the sublime.  Not so the equally long, and infinitely more tedious, descriptions of court life with which they are replaced in this last work. Th

CfP: The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies 2016 Thumbnail

CfP: The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies 2016

Posted by Matt Foley on December 10, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , , ,

The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies is currently seeking submissions for Issue #15, to be published in late Summer 2016.   The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies is an annual, scholarly, peer-reviewed, open-access journal focusing on all aspects of the gothic and horror genres. Article submissions should be 5-7000 words and must follow the MHRA style guide. Reviews of fiction, scholarly books, films, television programmes, conferences, and new-media texts, as well as relevant interviews, should be no more than 1000 words in length.   Article Deadline: 1st March

Review: Let Me Tell You: New Stories, Essays, and Other Writings. By Shirley Jackson. Thumbnail

Review: Let Me Tell You: New Stories, Essays, and Other Writings. By Shirley Jackson.

Posted by Matt Foley on November 13, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with ,

Let Me Tell You: New Stories, case Essays, and Other Writings. By Shirley Jackson. Edited by Laurence Hyman Jackson and Sarah Hyman DeWitt. New York: Random House, 2015. Xxiii + 416 pp.               Darryl Hattenhauer Arizona State University West It is remarkable that so many fine examples of Jackson’s uncollected and even unpublished writing keep surfacing. It is not surprising that many of the pieces in this volume that were previously collected rank with some of her best writing. Indeed, many of them appeared in such venues as Vogue an

Review: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright

Posted by Maria Cohut on October 15, 2015 in Blog, Maria Cohurt, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2015 ISBN-10: 1447277899 ISBN-13: 978-1447277897 Following the 'gift' booklet released on the occasion of World Book Day this year, Macmillan have published yet another instalment in Chris Riddell's 'Goth Girl' series: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright. Right in time, too, for the celebration of the Ada Lovelace Day on the 13th October (happy belated Ada Lovelace Day!), with another story about her fictional namesake, Ada Goth, 'the only child of Lord Goth, England's foremost cycling poet', also prominently featuring

Review: Datlow (ed.) Lovecraft’s Monsters (San Francisco: Tachyon, 2014) Thumbnail

Review: Datlow (ed.) Lovecraft’s Monsters (San Francisco: Tachyon, 2014)

Posted by Chloe Buckley on August 23, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , ,

The Weird Monster and Popular Culture From the vaults of cult fiction and role-playing manuals, the monsters of H.P. Lovecraft’s Weird fiction are becoming increasingly visible in popular culture, often recognized through the metonym of the tentacle. The rise of the tentacle, and of Lovecraft's fiction more generally, has been facilitated by Cthulhu, the most (in)famous of Lovecraft's monsters and the one whose name has come to be associated with the “mythos” Lovecraft inaugurated through his fiction. Before I move on to think about the volume of short stories - Lovecraft's Mon

Review: Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic Thumbnail

Review: Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic

Posted by Donna Mitchell on July 02, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic. By Rebecca Munford. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013. ISBN: 978-0-7190-7671-8 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Perhaps inspired by Carter’s claim that ‘[c]ontradictions are the only things that make any sense’[i], Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic sees Rebecca Munford take on the daunting task of examining the feminist dialogue in Carter’s texts through a masculinist lineage of European Gothic writers. She justifies her reasons for the unusual combination b

Review: The Gothic Child (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: The Gothic Child (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on March 20, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

The Gothic Child. By Margarita Georgieva. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-137-30606-7 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell  The Gothic Child offers a thoughtful and comprehensive discussion on the child in gothic literature using the genre’s treatment of this figure as an idea, concept, and/or memory within a text, as captured in Georgieva’s claim that ‘[t]he gothic world is, in fact, the world of childhood’ (Georgieva 60). Georgieva discusses the typical portrait and nature of the gothic child and traces its development both structurally and thematically by initially con

Review: Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen

Posted by Maria Cohut on March 14, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

  Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2015 ISBN-10: 1447282477 ISBN-13: 978-1447282471 Written and published on the occasion of this year's World Book Day, Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen is Chris Riddell's newest installment in the 'Goth Girl' children's series, following Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse and Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death. Unlike the previous two books, this one is considerably shorter, and also not nearly as stunning as an object: while Riddell's complex and lighthearted illustrations still provide enough for the gluttono