Arthur Machen

Aaron Worth on Machen’s Gothic Transmutations Thumbnail

Aaron Worth on Machen’s Gothic Transmutations

Posted by Timothy Jones on April 11, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

Last month, I had the opportunity to speak with novelist Phil Rickman as part of his BBC Radio Wales book programme, in an episode titled ‘Can horror fiction return from the dead?’. Its theme, as the title suggests, was horror’s sudden decline in popularity after the boom of the 1980s—a grisly case of ‘genre-cide,’ as Phil put it—as well as its future prospects for revivification. After an interview with Owen King—whose collaboration with his famous father (Sleeping Beauties) was in the end summed up as ‘occasionally a bit scary...but not horror’—Phil spoke with a pair of

‘The Secret of Stanway’: Cynthia Asquith as Literary Networker Thumbnail

‘The Secret of Stanway’: Cynthia Asquith as Literary Networker

Posted by Matt Foley on October 31, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

‘In every relationship I am conscious of doubling the parts of Pygmalion and Galatea; I make and I am made’ – Cynthia Asquith (1950, xiv-xv) Much of the limited scholarly literature that has read biographer, diarist, and ghost story collection editor Lady Cynthia Asquith’s contribution to early to middle twentieth-century British fiction stages her as a Galatea-esque figure: a passive recipient of roles fashioned for her by both D.H. Lawrence and J.M. Barrie. There are certainly circumstantial reasons for reading Asquith in this way. Lawrence’s desire to paint, as Asquith recoun

Impossible Spaces: Finding Their Way to the Queen of Fairyland Thumbnail

Impossible Spaces: Finding Their Way to the Queen of Fairyland

Posted by jessicageorge on October 27, 2013 in Guest Blog, Jessica George tagged with ,

As the stories in Impossible Spaces illustrate—from the claustrophobic, role-switching psychodrama of Daisy Black’s ‘The Carrier’ to Douglas Thompson’s exploration of split selves, ‘Multiplicity’—one of the most interesting aspects of impossible spaces in fiction is the transformation they may occasion in those who inhabit or journey between them. In the third of my Impossible Spaces blog tour posts, I’m going to talk about an impossible space which will always leave the traveller irrevocably changed: fairyland. The same goes for fairy rings, fairy mounds, or any of the ot