Ann Radcliffe

The Battle Hymn of the Bathroom: What a Gothic Reading of Julia Ward Howe’s The Hermaphrodite Can Teach Us about Contemporary Trans Panic Thumbnail

The Battle Hymn of the Bathroom: What a Gothic Reading of Julia Ward Howe’s The Hermaphrodite Can Teach Us about Contemporary Trans Panic

Posted by Heather Barrett on June 03, 2016 in Guest Blog tagged with , , ,

The U.S. Departments of Justice and Education recently released joint guidelines to protect the rights of transgender students throughout the nation’s schools, “even in circumstances in which other students, parents, or community members raise objections or concerns” (2). These federal guidelines respond to several state laws that require individuals to use public facilities consistent with their sex designated at birth rather than their current gender identity. Advocates of these laws also emphasize protection, arguing that they seek to shield women and children from being preyed

The Enchantress of Words, Sounds and Images:  Anniversary Essays on Ann Radcliffe Thumbnail

The Enchantress of Words, Sounds and Images: Anniversary Essays on Ann Radcliffe

Posted by Dale Townshend on July 02, 2015 in News tagged with

The Enchantress of Words, Sounds and Images: Anniversary Essays on Ann Radcliffe (1764-1823) Edited by Jakub Lipski and Jacek Mydla Publisher: Academica Press, LLC Box 60728 Cambridge Station Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 329-0685 http://www.academicapress.com/node/240 From the Foreword by Angela Wright: 2014, the 250th birthday of Ann Radcliffe, thankfully witnessed a renewed attention to her major achievements in the literary arena. An international conference devoted to her, a prominent place accorded to her in the British Library’s exhibition ‘Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagina

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen Thumbnail

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on June 30, 2015 in Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , , , ,

For my final blog, I would like to examine my actual process of adaptation more closely, in order to discuss the practical steps which I undertook in transposing Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho into the format of a script for television. In doing so, I will be referring back to the excerpt of my adaptation which I posted in my last blog. For those of you who did not have a chance to read it, here it is again: EPISODE 1, SCENE 4 FADE IN: INT. EMILY’S BED CHAMBER- MIDNIGHT. The only light in Emily’s chamber emanates from the meagre glow of several candles on the mantelpiece

An ‘Obscure and Terrible’ Place: Restructuring Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ for the TV Screen Thumbnail

An ‘Obscure and Terrible’ Place: Restructuring Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ for the TV Screen

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on June 05, 2015 in Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , , ,

 In my last blog on my six-part adaptation of Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho for TV, vialis 40mg I discussed the way in which Radcliffe’s text demands significant restructuring in order to render it suitable for a visual re-representation of the romance for a modern audience. I first stumbled upon Radcliffe’s work during my initial reading of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey when I was 15 years old. As many of you will know who have read—or attempted to read—a Radcliffe novel, the experience can be somewhat daunting, and, needless to say, rather unlike Catherine Morla

Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’: An Adaptation for Television Thumbnail

Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’: An Adaptation for Television

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on May 27, 2015 in Blog, Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , ,

Earlier this month, I was lucky enough to attend the University of Sheffield’s symposium on Re-Imagining the Gothic, in which speakers shared the ways in which they have creatively re-engaged with the genre through their own insights and projects. During the symposium, I was particularly struck by the sheer variety of mediums and methods through which other speakers re-represented the Gothic. We watched several short films, read creative responses to Gothic novels, and listened to the re-telling of regional Lancashire folk tales--to name a few of the excellent projects on display. Stand

The Dying Text: Learning from Scottish Gothic Thumbnail

The Dying Text: Learning from Scottish Gothic

Posted by Timothy C. Baker on April 27, 2015 in Guest Blog, Timothy Baker tagged with , , ,

While death is self-evidently a primary theme of Gothic in all its iterations, mourning is no less so. Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho, for instance, ends with the following curious formulation: ‘And, if the weak hand, that has recorded this tale, has, by its scenes, beguiled the mourner of one hour of sorrow, or, by its moral, taught him to sustain it – the effort, however humble, has not been vain, nor is the writer unrewarded’ (p. 672). Reading a Gothic novel may be useful diversion, but it may just as much provide a model for mourning. Gothic teaches us something about o

New Publication – Ann Radcliffe’s Observations during a Tour to the Lakes Thumbnail

New Publication – Ann Radcliffe’s Observations during a Tour to the Lakes

Posted by Dale Townshend on March 26, 2015 in News tagged with

Ann Radcliffe’s Observations during a Tour to the Lakes of Lancashire, Westmoreland, and Cumberland, edited by Penny Bradshaw (Bookcase: Carlisle, 2014). In 1794 the Gothic novelist, Ann Radcliffe, set out on a tour of the Lake District and the following year she published an account of her experience as Observations during a Tour to the Lakes. This account of the Lakes is shaped by Radcliffe’s distinctive literary style and imaginative perspectives as well as by the turbulent political climate of these years, and represents an important stepping-stone in the journey from picturesqu

The Three Dungeons of St. Leon Thumbnail

The Three Dungeons of St. Leon

Posted by Richard Gough Thomas on September 16, 2014 in Richard Gough Thomas tagged with , ,

St. Leon, A Tale of the Sixteenth Century (1799) is the second of Godwin’s major novels. Unlike the relatively down-to-earth narrative of Caleb Williams, St. Leon is a story of the fantastic. The disgraced noble of the title is entrusted with the secrets of alchemy; able to create gold seemingly from nothing and to preserve his youth eternally, through the application of formulae taught to him by a mysterious stranger. Despite the protagonist’s best intentions, unlimited wealth brings him more grief than happiness. St. Leon’s efforts to help others are invariably stymied or perverted, ei

Ann Radcliffe at 250: Gothic and Romantic Imaginations Thumbnail

Ann Radcliffe at 250: Gothic and Romantic Imaginations

Posted by Carly Stevenson on August 05, 2014 in Blog, Carly Stevenson tagged with , , , ,

A review by the University of Sheffield's Gothic Reading Group: Last month marked a special occasion for the history of the Gothic, as the University of Sheffield celebrated Ann Radcliffe’s 250th birthday with the first ever international academic conference dedicated entirely to ‘the great enchantress’ and her works. Ann Radcliffe at 250: Gothic and Romantic Imaginations ran for three days, between the 27th and 29th of June. The event was the result of long-planning and hard work on the part of its chief organisers, The University of Stirling’s Dr. Dale Townshend and Sheffield’s

Sublime Claustrophobia, a Gothic Paradox Thumbnail

Sublime Claustrophobia, a Gothic Paradox

Posted by Benjamin E. Noad on September 27, 2013 in Ben Noad, Blog tagged with , , , , , ,

Inspired by a recent visit to Edinburgh’s underground vaults (courtesy of City of the Dead Tours) – I now want to share my thoughts on this particularly Gothic phenomenon. The focus here is with the curious aftermath of identifying with the Sublime through a much specified use of fear.