Angela Carter

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 05, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction Gina Wisker Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-137-30348-6 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell In the introduction to her latest monograph, Gina Wisker defines contemporary women’s Gothic writing as the ‘subversive granddaughter of eighteenth-century Gothic fiction’ (Wisker 27) due to its ability to mix horror and fantasy, liberate forbidden desires, and expose repressed or hidden secrets from the past. Her study brings attention to the many essential links between feminist perspectives / critiques and contemporary women’s Gothic writi

The Eye of Profane Pleasures: Fairy Tales, Pornography and the Male Gaze in Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” and “The Erl-King” (Part 3) Thumbnail

The Eye of Profane Pleasures: Fairy Tales, Pornography and the Male Gaze in Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” and “The Erl-King” (Part 3)

Posted by Elizabeth Turner on March 12, 2016 in Blog, Elizabeth Turner tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Part 3: The Erl-King: Scopophilia, Consumption and an Alternative to the Male Gaze Angela Carter’s tale of “The Erl-King” is different from her other fables, as it is not derived from a fairy tale but instead taken from Goethe’s eighteenth-century ballad, “Der Erlkönig”. The poem tells the story of a wicked elf king, who haunts the Black Forest of Germany luring children to their death. However, in true Angela Carter style, she reworks the narrative to center, not upon the ensnarement of children, but of young maidens. Like “The Bloody Chamber”, “The Erl-King” takes plac

The Eye of Profane Pleasures: Fairy Tales, Pornography and the Male Gaze in Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” and “The Erl-King” (Part 2) Thumbnail

The Eye of Profane Pleasures: Fairy Tales, Pornography and the Male Gaze in Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” and “The Erl-King” (Part 2)

Posted by Elizabeth Turner on March 03, 2016 in Blog, Elizabeth Turner tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Part 2: The Bloody Chamber as a Scopophilic Fairy Tale   The basis for Angela Carter’s short story “The Bloody Chamber” is derived from the seventeenth-century fable by Charles Perrault entitled, “Bluebeard”, the premise of which revolves around the marriage of a young girl to a wealthy aristocrat, who, as she later discovers has a nasty penchant for murdering his wives. Within “The Bloody Chamber” Carter utilizes the original Gothic iconography of Perrault’s text such as the isolated castle, the naive virgin girl, the tyrannical male, confined spaces, and horrific sec

The Eye of Profane Pleasures: Fairy Tales, Pornography and the Male Gaze in Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” and “The Erl-King” (Part 1) Thumbnail

The Eye of Profane Pleasures: Fairy Tales, Pornography and the Male Gaze in Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” and “The Erl-King” (Part 1)

Posted by Elizabeth Turner on February 23, 2016 in Blog, Elizabeth Turner tagged with , , , ,

Part 1: An Introduction to Fairy Tales and Pornography My first experience reading Angela Carter was during an Introduction to Literature class, at Kutztown University. The narrative assigned was “The Loves of Lady Purple”, a tale that centered upon the life of a female marionette who, after being repeatedly debased as a prostitute, comes to life to kill her oppressive, male puppeteer. The story was only eleven pages in its entirety and yet it wielded an inexplicable power over me. I had never read anything quite like it before and I closed the book, feeling both terribly intimidated

Review: Women and Domestic Space in Contemporary Gothic Narratives: The House as Subject Thumbnail

Review: Women and Domestic Space in Contemporary Gothic Narratives: The House as Subject

Posted by Donna Mitchell on November 19, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Women and Domestic Space in Contemporary Gothic Narratives: The House as Subject. Andrew Hock Soon Ng Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-137-53681-5 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Hock Soon Ng approaches the subject of the house in Gothic narratives with two intentions; he wishes firstly, to identify and expose the intimate link between the text’s female subject and the house, and secondly, to explore how this link’s complex dimension indirectly reveals the ambiguity that characterises the latter. Concentrating on the interiority of the house that not only makes it a home

The lamb must learn to run with the tigers; La Belle et la Bête and The Tiger’s Bride Thumbnail

The lamb must learn to run with the tigers; La Belle et la Bête and The Tiger’s Bride

Posted by Stephanie Gallon on November 09, 2015 in Stephanie Gallon tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

In my last post, I discussed the surrealist French film La Belle et la Bête, written and directed in 1946 by Jean Cocteau. Despite being a mainstream success and a critical darling in France and more recently lauded for its ‘surreal elegance’ (Hogan, 1997: 90), the film was received in Surrealist circles as a poor imitation of the artistic movement. Cocteau denied being a Surrealist, despite his works often being cited as Surrealist cinema. La Belle et la Bête is not purely surrealism; it is surrealism made Gothic and traditional. Angela Carter’s short story The Tiger’s Bride seem

Review: Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic Thumbnail

Review: Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic

Posted by Donna Mitchell on July 02, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic. By Rebecca Munford. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013. ISBN: 978-0-7190-7671-8 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Perhaps inspired by Carter’s claim that ‘[c]ontradictions are the only things that make any sense’[i], Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic sees Rebecca Munford take on the daunting task of examining the feminist dialogue in Carter’s texts through a masculinist lineage of European Gothic writers. She justifies her reasons for the unusual combination b

A Night With A Vampire Thumbnail

A Night With A Vampire

Posted by Sharon Deans on November 28, 2011 in News tagged with , ,

David Tennant reads The Lady of the House of Love by Angela Carter for BBC Radio 4's Book at Bedtime this week.  Monday-Friday at 10.45pm.

The Company of Wolves screening (Stirling event) Thumbnail

The Company of Wolves screening (Stirling event)

Posted by Glennis Byron on November 02, 2010 in News tagged with , ,

The fourth in the Gothic Imagination Film Series: The Company of Wolves Monday 8 November, 4-6 in Pathfoot B17. Informal discussion afterwards. Everyone welcome. Organiser is Sarah Anderson at saa00051@students.stir.ac.uk