adaptation

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946) Thumbnail

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946)

Posted by Stephanie Gallon on October 26, 2015 in Blog, Stephanie Gallon tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The term ‘surréaliste’, or surrealist, was coined by Guillaume Apollinaire in 1917 in response to Jean Cocteau’s ballet Parade. It meant to Apollinaire ‘an attempt to reach beyond the limits of the “real”’ (Baldick, 2008: 324). In looser terms, surrealist is to describe something as imaginative but bizarre. Much of Cocteau’s 1946 film La Belle et la Bête fits in to this definition. The palace itself is an isolated and dark place, very much fitting in to the Gothic tradition. There are disembodied hands to act as servants though Belle calls them ‘invisible’. They hold t

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen Thumbnail

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on June 30, 2015 in Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , , , ,

For my final blog, I would like to examine my actual process of adaptation more closely, in order to discuss the practical steps which I undertook in transposing Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho into the format of a script for television. In doing so, I will be referring back to the excerpt of my adaptation which I posted in my last blog. For those of you who did not have a chance to read it, here it is again: EPISODE 1, SCENE 4 FADE IN: INT. EMILY’S BED CHAMBER- MIDNIGHT. The only light in Emily’s chamber emanates from the meagre glow of several candles on the mantelpiece

An ‘Obscure and Terrible’ Place: Restructuring Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ for the TV Screen Thumbnail

An ‘Obscure and Terrible’ Place: Restructuring Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ for the TV Screen

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on June 05, 2015 in Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , , ,

 In my last blog on my six-part adaptation of Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho for TV, vialis 40mg I discussed the way in which Radcliffe’s text demands significant restructuring in order to render it suitable for a visual re-representation of the romance for a modern audience. I first stumbled upon Radcliffe’s work during my initial reading of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey when I was 15 years old. As many of you will know who have read—or attempted to read—a Radcliffe novel, the experience can be somewhat daunting, and, needless to say, rather unlike Catherine Morla

Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’: An Adaptation for Television Thumbnail

Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’: An Adaptation for Television

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on May 27, 2015 in Blog, Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , ,

Earlier this month, I was lucky enough to attend the University of Sheffield’s symposium on Re-Imagining the Gothic, in which speakers shared the ways in which they have creatively re-engaged with the genre through their own insights and projects. During the symposium, I was particularly struck by the sheer variety of mediums and methods through which other speakers re-represented the Gothic. We watched several short films, read creative responses to Gothic novels, and listened to the re-telling of regional Lancashire folk tales--to name a few of the excellent projects on display. Stand

Gothic Games Part 2 – Clock Tower Thumbnail

Gothic Games Part 2 – Clock Tower

Posted by Danny Cummins on February 01, 2012 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

Clock Tower is a story of orphans, isolation, sordid family secrets and sprawling Norwegian castles, as such, all the critical elements for a piece of classic gothic story-telling.

Gothic Games Part 1 – Clive Barker’s Undying Thumbnail

Gothic Games Part 1 – Clive Barker’s Undying

Posted by Danny Cummins on September 19, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

My aim with this series is to draw attention to some of the best examples of ‘gothic gaming’ produced over the years. Whilst video games have become a universally recognised academic field, there is still a considerable gap between their current circulation and the cultural space held by other forms of media such as books and films. In the first part of what I hope will be an interesting and informative series, I will be examining Clive Barker’s Undying, arguably one of strongest examples of gothic adaptation yet seen in video gaming. Undying was one of the first games to use the first person perspective to connect players’ experience directly to the world of the game, boasting one of the most immersive and atmospheric representations of ‘period horror’ story-telling yet conceived in a video game.

World War Z and Cloud Atlas Thumbnail

World War Z and Cloud Atlas

Posted by Glennis Byron on April 13, 2011 in News tagged with , , , ,

Two adaptations that have been in the works for a while finally look as though they are actually going ahead.

Mind Yer Step: Tread Carefully Through ‘The Crimson Petal and the White’ Thumbnail

Mind Yer Step: Tread Carefully Through ‘The Crimson Petal and the White’

Posted by Sharon Deans on April 07, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

‘Mind Yer Step’ indeed, as we trudge through the ordure, the blood, the piss buckets and the douche basins of backstreet Victorian London in BBC 2’s four-part adaptation of Michel Faber’s The Crimson Petal and the White....