21st Century Gothic

“a bit like Serial”: journo-podding and the new sounds of horror Thumbnail

“a bit like Serial”: journo-podding and the new sounds of horror

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 20, 2016 in Blog, Danielle Hancock, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  Up until the advent of Serial, I had a hard time explaining my research area to people. “Podcasts”, I’d say. “Pod-what?”, they’d reply. “Podcasts, scary ones. Like Welcome to Nightvale”. “Oh. Yeah, I’ve never heard of that.” There would be an exchange of mutually apologetic smiles, I’d mutter something about it being a bit like radio, and wish I’d stuck with literature studies. Then Serial happened. An off-shoot of NPR’s vastly popular radio programme cum podcast, This American Life,  Serial followed journalist Sarah Koenig’s ongoing, true-life, investi

Monstrosity, False Twins, and the Bush Thumbnail

Monstrosity, False Twins, and the Bush

Posted by Madelyn Schoonover on April 15, 2016 in Blog, Madelyn Schoonover tagged with , , , ,

In part two, I discussed Jessamy's fractured identity in The Icarus Girl, and how the patriarchal modes of colonizing England and Nigeria both hinder Jessamy's ability to assert a stable identity. I then introduced the ambiguous spirit TillyTilly as a productive presence in Jessamy's life that helps her begin to find self-confidence. Though Jessamy initially finds comfort in TillyTilly’s ability to transgress identity, as the novel progresses, TillyTilly becomes a much more fixed and dangerous thing. In keeping with the traditional Gothic trope of doubling, TillyTilly becomes a mons

Dangerous Doubling and Fractured Identity in “The Icarus Girl” Thumbnail

Dangerous Doubling and Fractured Identity in “The Icarus Girl”

Posted by Madelyn Schoonover on April 09, 2016 in Blog, Madelyn Schoonover tagged with , , , ,

In part one of this three part series, I explained how the colonial program implemented the concept of the European Family of Man to control colonized societies, and to completely erase the colonized female from discourse. I proposed that postcolonial Gothic is a medium for colonized females to regain this lost voice. In this section, I will explore some of the traditionally Gothic tropes that Helen Oyeyemi utilizes to interrogate a postcolonial past and move toward a more empowered future for her protagonist Jessamy in The Icarus Girl. Like many traditional Gothic heroines such as J

Female Gothic, Post-Colonialism, and The Icarus Girl Thumbnail

Female Gothic, Post-Colonialism, and The Icarus Girl

Posted by Madelyn Schoonover on April 01, 2016 in Madelyn Schoonover tagged with , , , , ,

Since the Whig politician Horace Walpole first penned The Castle of Otranto in 1764, Gothic authors have been objecting to rigid social and political conventions and structures, questioning authority in its sundry forms from tyrannical patriarch to power-hungry Prioress. In stories of terror and intrigue such as Matthew Lewis’ The Monk (1796), readers enter an uncanny literary universe of the hyperreal; places where ghosts of past traumas are literal and rationality will not always save the heroes. As Andrew Smith and William Hughes note, the Gothic is a “celebration of the irrational,

THE DEEP, DARK, HYPNOTIC SPELL OF SCORPIUS Thumbnail

THE DEEP, DARK, HYPNOTIC SPELL OF SCORPIUS

Posted by Dr David Annwn Jones on November 18, 2015 in Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , ,

Lisa Starry’s A Vampire Tale by Scorpius Dance, Sunday 21st October, 2015, Spa Pavilion, Whitby There are a few, a very few dance companies who can claim to embody a truly convincing and visceral Gothic and vampiric experience realised through the skills of world-class artists and performers. Perhaps Indianapolis-based ‘The Casket Girls: A Modern Gothic Vampire Ballet’ and Northern Ballet’s production of Dracula come close at times. There are also, of course, more intimate and small-scale productions: Gothic burlesque and belly-dancing artists, one-off Halloween shows and Rocky H

Review: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright

Posted by Maria Cohut on October 15, 2015 in Blog, Maria Cohurt, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2015 ISBN-10: 1447277899 ISBN-13: 978-1447277897 Following the 'gift' booklet released on the occasion of World Book Day this year, Macmillan have published yet another instalment in Chris Riddell's 'Goth Girl' series: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright. Right in time, too, for the celebration of the Ada Lovelace Day on the 13th October (happy belated Ada Lovelace Day!), with another story about her fictional namesake, Ada Goth, 'the only child of Lord Goth, England's foremost cycling poet', also prominently featuring

Machine Language and the Gothic – signal, noise, atmosphere Thumbnail

Machine Language and the Gothic – signal, noise, atmosphere

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on August 15, 2015 in Blog, Evan Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , , , , , , ,

We often think of scholars and practitioners of the creative arts and humanities as very different to coders and system engineers, yet they share much in their approach to language and communication. Many people have heard the joke about the eggs and the milk, which relies upon the linguistic tick of logical dependencies. A humanities scholar or author will enjoy the linguistic turn as well as a programmer – we all understand the structures of language, and enjoy playing with the quirks of the system. Many of us interdisciplinary scholars who have worked in the digital humanities or the me

Welcome Friends:  Horror Podcasting’s overthrow of the Mobile, Private iPod. Thumbnail

Welcome Friends: Horror Podcasting’s overthrow of the Mobile, Private iPod.

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 16, 2015 in Danielle Hancock tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Camp-fire tales and oral spook-tales aren’t just about sharing voices, they are also about sharing space. Faintly-lit faces in the darkness, making strange the presence of other humans, crowded around a beacon of light: a rough-shod, impermanent domestic in the wilderness, with goodness knows what watching from the shadows. There’s a thrill to be had in probing the limitations of the firelight’s safety, and in the uncertainty of one’s company; transformed by the stories and their in/visibility. The same is true of fireside ghost-tales, and Golden Era radio-horror listening: the fam

Review: Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen

Posted by Maria Cohut on March 14, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

  Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2015 ISBN-10: 1447282477 ISBN-13: 978-1447282471 Written and published on the occasion of this year's World Book Day, Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen is Chris Riddell's newest installment in the 'Goth Girl' children's series, following Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse and Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death. Unlike the previous two books, this one is considerably shorter, and also not nearly as stunning as an object: while Riddell's complex and lighthearted illustrations still provide enough for the gluttono

Review: Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition

Posted by Alexandra Campbell on February 06, 2015 in Alexandra Campbell tagged with , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition  By Timothy Baker  In 2001 Edinburgh University’s Polygon Press released a collection of short stories entitled Damage Land: New Scottish Gothic Fiction, bringing together stories from influential writers such as Ali Smith, Jackie Kay, John Burnside and Janice Galloway. Published barely three years after the establishment of a devolved Scottish Parliament in 1998 and appearing in the first breaths of the new millennium, the collection has been key in highlighting the pervasive nature of Gothic creative writing in Scotlan