The Gothic Literary Aesthetic I (from Gothic MOOC) Thumbnail

The Gothic Literary Aesthetic I (from Gothic MOOC)

Posted by Peter Lindfield on July 05, 2016 in Peter Lindfield tagged with , , , ,

Hello, and welcome to the archive of our videos from the second week of our AHRC-funded MOOC,  The Gothic Revival, 1700-1850: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. In the first session we started to make inroads into the manifold meanings of the term ‘Gothic’ in the eighteenth century, including the term’s associations with the ancient Gothic tribe, its perceived associations with British history, the architecture of the middle ages, literature, fashion and modern sub-culture, and more. In this session we are going to be paying sustained attention to a short text that is often held to be t

The Haunted House in French Culture Thumbnail

The Haunted House in French Culture

Posted by Timothy Jones on July 04, 2016 in Uncategorized tagged with

On 19 May 2016 an event was held at the School of Advanced Studies, University of London, to think and talk about the haunted house in French culture. Fanny Lacôte of the University of Stirling talked about the haunted house in French Gothic literature of the 18th and 19th centuries, while Guy Austin of the University of Newcastle talked about the haunted house in French cinema. You can find a podcast of each talk here:   The Haunted House in French Culture – Welcome and Fanny Lacôte   The Haunted House in French Culture – Guy Austin   The event was funded by the

What is Gothic? (from Gothic MOOC) Thumbnail

What is Gothic? (from Gothic MOOC)

Posted by Peter Lindfield on June 28, 2016 in Peter Lindfield tagged with , ,

Welcome to The Gothic Revival, 1700-1850: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. The videos included here, and those in my subsequent five posts, are drawn from a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) designed and delivered by me and Dale Townshend at the University of Stirling, and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council as part of the larger project entitled Writing Britain’s Ruins, 1700-1850: The Architectural Imagination. The MOOC ran for six weeks from 29 February 2016. These videos offer exciting and intensive explorations of the Gothic aesthetic in British culture of

What’s in a name? The Problem with Strawberry Hill Gothic as a Label, and Braziers, Oxfordshire Thumbnail

What’s in a name? The Problem with Strawberry Hill Gothic as a Label, and Braziers, Oxfordshire

Posted by Peter Lindfield on June 21, 2016 in Peter Lindfield tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

‘Strawberry Hill Gothic’ is a label often banded about when discussing eighteenth-century domestic Gothic architecture and design. Frankly, it not an overwhelmingly positive label: the important Victorian architects, designers and writers Charles Locke Eastlake (1833–1906) and A.W.N. Pugin (1812–52) made sure that Strawberry Hill was ingrained in our minds and imagination as a whimsical and, effectively, bad piece of eighteenth-century Gothic. Eastlake, in his monumental study, A History of the Gothic Revival (1872) condemns Walpole and his villa, Strawberry Hill: The interior, or

The Battle Hymn of the Bathroom: What a Gothic Reading of Julia Ward Howe’s The Hermaphrodite Can Teach Us about Contemporary Trans Panic Thumbnail

The Battle Hymn of the Bathroom: What a Gothic Reading of Julia Ward Howe’s The Hermaphrodite Can Teach Us about Contemporary Trans Panic

Posted by Heather Barrett on June 03, 2016 in Guest Blog tagged with , , ,

The U.S. Departments of Justice and Education recently released joint guidelines to protect the rights of transgender students throughout the nation’s schools, “even in circumstances in which other students, parents, or community members raise objections or concerns” (2). These federal guidelines respond to several state laws that require individuals to use public facilities consistent with their sex designated at birth rather than their current gender identity. Advocates of these laws also emphasize protection, arguing that they seek to shield women and children from being preyed

CFP: Fantastika Journal Thumbnail

CFP: Fantastika Journal

Posted by Donna Mitchell on May 30, 2016 in Donna Mitchell tagged with ,

Fantastika Journal Call for Papers for First Special Edition Issue  “Fantastika” – a term appropriated from a range of Slavonic languages by John Clute – embraces the genres of fantasy, science fiction, and horror, but can also include alternative histories, gothic, steampunk, young adult dystopian fiction, or any other radically imaginative narrative space. The goal of Fantastika Journal is to bring together academics and researchers who share an interest in this diverse range of fields with the aim of opening up new dialogues, productive controversies and collaborations. We invit

CFP: Global Frankenstein Thumbnail

CFP: Global Frankenstein

Posted by Dale Townshend on May 29, 2016 in News tagged with ,

2018 marks the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein. This edited volume is timed to celebrate its momentous impact throughout the world. The global reach of her “hideous progeny” has penetrated many disciplines including film, science, technology, the visual arts, and dance. The novel has been used to show how science has been culturally framed, even serving as a warning against GM crops with the label “Frankenfood.” Mary Shelley’s creation has been a watershed in the domains of science fiction and Gothic literature, by innovating new departures in genre and bri

Review: Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain Thumbnail

Review: Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain

Posted by Donna Mitchell on May 20, 2016 in Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain Melissa Edmundson Makala Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2013. ISBN: 978-0-70832-564-3 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Melissa Edmundson Makala begins her study of women’s ghost writing in nineteenth-century Britain by considering the various reasons for its increasing popularity, most notably its ability to function as a subversive means of discussing political and social issues. She notes that the nature of this genre allowed writers to explore the social tensions and inequalities which existed for certain groups without alienatin

Review: ‘Reimagining the Gothic: Monsters and Monstrosities’ symposium, 6th May 2016 Thumbnail

Review: ‘Reimagining the Gothic: Monsters and Monstrosities’ symposium, 6th May 2016

Posted by Amy Bride on May 19, 2016 in Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

‘Monster’ is a jointly allusive and ubiquitous term. For gothic scholars, what constitutes monstrosity is a vast and varied spectrum of physical abnormality, genetic hybridity, moral corruption, and everything in between. Yet for almost 200 years perceptions of the gothic monster in the popular imagination have been dominated by Mary Shelley and her life-creating doctor who has transcended literary boundaries to become a cultural icon in his own right. The task of re-analysing the gothic monster, both in conversation and contrast with Shelley’s creation, was that addressed by the ‘

Review: Frankenstein at the Royal Opera House Thumbnail

Review: Frankenstein at the Royal Opera House

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on May 19, 2016 in Evan Hayles Gledhill, Reviews tagged with , , ,

First, a preface. The last time I voluntarily watched a full dance production, it was Edward Scissorhands, and I hated the hedges. I generally plonk myself on the sofa for The Nutcracker at Christmas just for the Cossacks, which is my favourite bit. I am not a traditional dance fan; I tend to only watch a story I have a narrative interest in, otherwise I cherry pick sequences to be enthralled by the marvellous grace and athleticism of the dance. So, this is not a ballet review, it’s a Frankenstein review. I saw the new Liam Scarlett production in the cinema, as I missed out on affordable