Dark Successions: Monstrous array Thumbnail

Dark Successions: Monstrous array

Posted by Dr David Annwn Jones on January 12, 2014 in Uncategorized tagged with

The Gothic comic strip excelled at depicting vivid forms of grotesque monstrification especially of those individuals ostracised from mainstream life as in the case of Carl Reinhardt’s fantasy Tailor Lapp (1848-51) where a local tradesman becomes an emaciated wild man of the woods overgrown with hair. In the panel above, the civic guard join the crowds of people flying from the uncanny creature. Graphic sequences also updated several venerable forms of visual horror tale. Several sets of Alfred Rethel’s successive woodcuts such as the Totentanz sequence (1848) reveal the longevity of

Dark Successions: Gothic sequential art and the 19th century comic strip Thumbnail

Dark Successions: Gothic sequential art and the 19th century comic strip

Posted by Dr David Annwn Jones on January 01, 2014 in Uncategorized tagged with

I’d like to open this post on Gothic sequential art, comic strips and related media by thanking Dale Townshend, for inviting me to guest blog during January. The face of a sinister Frankenstein-like imp skulking in a forest is taken from Nadar’s graphic sequence: Mossieu Réac (1849), and is a caricature of Adolphe Thiers who is supposedly hiding after having two horses shot out from under him, (a reference to his rapid changes in political affiliation.) In his fine article 'Gothic chapbooks and Horror Comics' for The Gothic Imagination which can be viewed in full here: http://www.g

‘In the Land of the Pig, the Butcher is King’, an Interview with Joseph D’Lacey Thumbnail

‘In the Land of the Pig, the Butcher is King’, an Interview with Joseph D’Lacey

Posted by Xavier Aldana Reyes on December 05, 2013 in Interviews tagged with , ,

Xavier Aldana Reyes interviews the author of the eco-horror novel 'Meat' (2008) about the meat packing industry, belief systems and the human body.

After Dracula: The 1930s Horror Film, by Alison Peirse. Thumbnail

After Dracula: The 1930s Horror Film, by Alison Peirse.

Posted by Dale Townshend on December 02, 2013 in Reviews tagged with

After Dracula: The 1930s Horror FilmBy Alison Peirse London and New York: I.B Taurus (2013) ISBN: 978 I 84885 53I I Reviewed by Glenn Ward Histories of horror cinema habitually measure genre films of the 1930s against the output of Hollywood’s Universal Pictures. While the influence of silent German Expressionist works such as The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (Robert Wiene, 1920) is acknowledged, interwar horror is said to belong almost entirely to Universal. Beginning with Dracula (Tod Browning, 1931), this studio’s products have come to define the canon and dominate the history. As her ti

Steve Jones, ‘Torture Porn’, reviewed by Xavier Aldana Reyes Thumbnail

Steve Jones, ‘Torture Porn’, reviewed by Xavier Aldana Reyes

Posted by Xavier Aldana Reyes on November 25, 2013 in Reviews tagged with , , ,

Steve Jones, Torture Porn: Popular Horror after Saw (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) When I started researching my doctoral thesis, which would include an extensive chapter on the workings of affect in torture porn, there was hardly any secondary material available on this recent horror subgenre. Later, as I started talking to colleagues and friends about my research, I was often asked why I had chosen such a grisly and bleak topic of study. There was even one particular instance where an academic challenged the cultural value of films such as Saw (James Wan, 2004)

Animal Horror / Animal Gothic Film: CFP Thumbnail

Animal Horror / Animal Gothic Film: CFP

Posted by Dale Townshend on November 14, 2013 in News tagged with

Animal Horror/Animal Gothic Film We invite proposals for the first book-length collection that explores the confrontation between the human and the animal in horror, gothic and survival film. From Hitchcock’s The Birds (1963) via The Edge (1997) to Piranha 3D (2010), animal horror has charted the transformation of the domestic to the monstrous and uncanny, told stories of invasion and counter-invasion, collapsed and erected sexual and racial borders and explored the increasingly fraught relationship between human culture, human society and nature/Nature. We are interested in contributio

Dare You? new anthology challenges notions of children’s gothic [Review] Thumbnail

Dare You? new anthology challenges notions of children’s gothic [Review]

Posted by Chloe Buckley on November 12, 2013 in News, Reviews tagged with , , , , , ,

Dare You: A Gothic Anthology by gifted young writers Edited by Charlotte Cubitt Publisher: RPA Young Publishers (Aug 2013) ISBN-10:0957698100 ISBN-13:978-0957698109 Review by Chloe Buckley Since its inception, gothic fiction has been at the heart of a debate about what is and isn’t appropriate reading material for the young. Even the earliest gothic novels were subject to plenty of criticism for exposing impressionable readers to the worst kind of vices and excess. In recent years, some of the terms in this debate have changed, but, as Dr. Catherine Spooner recently pointed

CFP: Guillermo del Toro Thumbnail

CFP: Guillermo del Toro

Posted by Dale Townshend on November 11, 2013 in News tagged with ,

Guillermo del Toro is one of the most interesting people currently involved in genre in its various expressions. He is an artist who embodies his art that comes as a result of his creative passions and deep reflection. One of the elements that make him so interesting is critical reflection on various elements that contribute to his approach at bringing genre to life. This includes his interests in monsters, myth, archetype, metaphor, Carl Jung, the paranormal, and even religion in the form of reactions against his Catholic upbringing. This volume will explore these and other facets that info

Exotic Gothic 4 Winner of World Fantasy Award for Best Anthology Thumbnail

Exotic Gothic 4 Winner of World Fantasy Award for Best Anthology

Posted by Dale Townshend on November 10, 2013 in Uncategorized tagged with

On 3 November 2013, PS Publishing’s Postscripts #28/29: Exotic Gothic 4 won this year’s World Fantasy Award for Best Anthology. The Gothic Imagination asked the anthology’s editor of new fiction, University of Stirling research postgraduate Danel Olson, how he chose the stories that went in. DO: Selection for this volume of twenty-five original neo-Gothic stories rested on five factors. First, I wanted to feature more voices that had never appeared in the series before, along with new countries as settings. Beyond that, I wanted more women to enter the series, because study af

Impossible Spaces, Impossible Authors Thumbnail

Impossible Spaces, Impossible Authors

Posted by jessicageorge on October 30, 2013 in Guest Blog, Jessica George tagged with ,

For my last Impossible Spaces blog tour post this month, I’m going to go back to something Tracy Fahey touched on in one of her Gothic Intersections posts: the idea of dissolving boundaries between selves, and particularly authorial selves.