CFP: Sonic Horror

Posted by Matt Foley on February 14, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , ,

CFP: Sonic Horror “Shh—was that a voice?” Sound is arguably one of the most fear-provoking aspects of horror. Ghost stories and horror films employ sonic tropes such as creaking floor boards, sudden loud thumps, or ephemeral children’s choirs in order to enhance suspense through the evocation of unseen terror. “The spectre of sound”, as Kevin Donnelly has called it, creeps up on us dorsally, evading the relative comfort of visual recognition. Sonic horror tropes have also been used to imbue other genres, such as musical theatre and popular music, with elements of horror. Whether

Review: The Night of the Zombie, The Circus of Horrors, Albert Halls, Stirling, February 1st, 2015 Thumbnail

Review: The Night of the Zombie, The Circus of Horrors, Albert Halls, Stirling, February 1st, 2015

Posted by Tanja Jurković on February 13, 2015 in Reviews tagged with , , ,

  The lights inside the venue suddenly went out. Darkness was holding each and every member of the audience in its strong grip. Vague shapes on the dark stage started to move, accompanied by unfamiliar noises that caused shivers going down my spine. All of a sudden a deep, howling and ominous voice started telling the story of terror that is about to happen in front of our eyes, the story of “a decrepit corpse ridden London, plagued by Zombies, a city ruled by the undead and climaxing in an awesome flaming apocalypse”. The Night of the Zombie has begun. Set in 2020, “the story

PhD Studentship: Literature and Architecture, 1700–1850 Thumbnail

PhD Studentship: Literature and Architecture, 1700–1850

Posted by Dale Townshend on February 08, 2015 in News tagged with

UNIVERSITY OF STIRLING SCHOOL OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES FULLY-FUNDED DOCTORAL STUDENTSHIP: Literature and Architecture, 1700—1850. The School of Arts and Humanities is pleased to invite applications for this three-year, fully-funded PhD Studentship (fees and subsistence at current AHRC UK/EU rates). Funded by the University of Stirling, this studentship is designed to complement an AHRC Leadership Project entitled ‘Writing Britain’s Ruins, 1700-1850: The Architectural Imagination’. Led by Dale Townshend, and supported by post-Doctoral Fellow Dr Peter Lin

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience Thumbnail

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on February 07, 2015 in Blog, Evan Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Gothic became a self-parodying genre very quickly: Jane Austen wrote the self-reflexive Northanger Abbey in 1798, though it did not see publication for nearly twenty years after that. Two hundred years later, the gothic has expanded and adapted, and a mocking inter-textual awareness is a key quality for the popularity of the genre. The audience for this fiction has long been perceived as skewing feminine, as is recognized and critiqued in Austen’s work. The modern southern gothic of True Blood (2007-2014), and American gothic Supernatural (2005-ongoing), also recognize a majority female fan

Review: Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition

Posted by Alexandra Campbell on February 06, 2015 in Alexandra Campbell tagged with , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition  By Timothy Baker  In 2001 Edinburgh University’s Polygon Press released a collection of short stories entitled Damage Land: New Scottish Gothic Fiction, bringing together stories from influential writers such as Ali Smith, Jackie Kay, John Burnside and Janice Galloway. Published barely three years after the establishment of a devolved Scottish Parliament in 1998 and appearing in the first breaths of the new millennium, the collection has been key in highlighting the pervasive nature of Gothic creative writing in Scotlan

Review: Richard Nowell (ed.) Merchants of Menace: the Business of Horror Cinema Thumbnail

Review: Richard Nowell (ed.) Merchants of Menace: the Business of Horror Cinema

Posted by Matt Foley on February 04, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , ,

Merchants of Menace: the Business of Horror Cinema. Edited by Richard Nowell New York: Bloomsbury, 2014. ISBN: 978-1-6235-6420-9 Reviewed by Ann Davies Richard Nowell’s introduction to this collection of essays is subtitled ‘There’s Gold in Them There Chills’, a phrase which summarises the common thread that unites the essays: the Gothic and horror as industry and money-making opportunity. This reflects the increasing academic interest in film production and industry more widely in Film Studies, but is in any case a different approach from the usual tendency to analyse horror fil

Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Sept 3rd-5th 2015: Call for Papers and Panels Thumbnail

Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Sept 3rd-5th 2015: Call for Papers and Panels

Posted by Matt Foley on January 29, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with ,

Open Graves, Open Minds: ‘The Company of Wolves’: Sociality, Animality, and Subjectivity in Literary and Cultural Narratives—Werewolves, Shapeshifters, and Feral Humans   Wolves have long been the archetypal enemy of human company, preying on the unguarded boundaries of civilisation, threatening the pastoral of ideal sociality and figuring as sexual predators. Yet, in their way, with their complex pack interactions, they have served as a model for society. Lately, this ancient enemy has been rehabilitated and reappraised, and rewilding projects have attempted to admit them mo

Final Call for Nominations: Allan LLoyd Smith Prize Thumbnail

Final Call for Nominations: Allan LLoyd Smith Prize

Posted by Matt Foley on January 28, 2015 in News tagged with ,

The Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for Gothic Criticism 2015 Reminder: Call for nominations by February 1st.   In 2011, as a memorial to its founding President Dr Allan Lloyd Smith (1945-2010), the International Gothic Association established a prize to be awarded for a scholarly publication considered to have advanced the field of Gothic studies significantly. For the 2015 incarnation of the award we are delighted to announce that there will be two Prizes of £100 each: one for a standout monograph published on the Gothic over the last two years, and another for an edited collection

Sky’s Penny Dreadful and the Victorian Theatre Thumbnail

Sky’s Penny Dreadful and the Victorian Theatre

Posted by Sarah A. Winter on January 21, 2015 in Blog, Sarah Winter tagged with , , , , ,

(Some plot spoilers!) The launch of Sky’s Penny Dreadful in 2014 was greeted with an overwhelmingly positive response. Bringing together famous characters from canonical Gothic texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818), Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897), along with referencing some penny dreadful tales, the writers conveyed original aspects of the narratives, and also added experimental twists by intrepidly weaving in new characters and amendments to the texts’ plots. The concoction of explicit scene

A Collaborative Review of Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination Thumbnail

A Collaborative Review of Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination

Posted by Kelly Gardner on January 16, 2015 in Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

On the 5th December 2014, a group of Stirling’s Gothic students began a voyage of macabre delight. Journeying to the British Library for a Goth-infused weekend that included an evening of Gothic Tales, the Gothic Study Day, and of course, the Terror and Wonder Exhibition. This post serves as a collaborative review of the experience. Our heartfelt thanks go to the University of Stirling’s Professor Douglas Brodie and Dr Dale Townshend for making the trip a possibility. An introduction by Sonja Zimmermann and Marina Pérez: In the autumn and winter of 2014, a year that marks the 250th