Reminder: Re-Imagining the Gothic abstract deadline Thumbnail

Reminder: Re-Imagining the Gothic abstract deadline

Posted by Matt Foley on January 27, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , , , ,

Reimagining the Gothic 2016: Monsters and Monstrosities A reminder to our readers that the abstract deadlines for the one-day academic symposium and showcase Reimagining the Gothic: Monsters and Monstrosities are coming upon us. The organisers at Sheffield are particularly keen to hear from those who wish to contribute to the creative strand of the programme as well as to the academic symposium. While the deadline for proposals for academic papers is 8th February 2016, viagra the creative CfP, for sale reproduced below, asks for submissions by March 7th.  Creative CfP As part of a two

MOOC: The Gothic Revival, 1700–1850: Interdisciplinary Perspectives Thumbnail

MOOC: The Gothic Revival, 1700–1850: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Posted by Peter Lindfield on January 21, 2016 in Blog, News, Peter Lindfield tagged with ,

We’re delighted to announce our Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), viagra buy The Gothic Revival, cialis 1700–1850: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Commencing on Monday 29 February 2016, purchase this six-week course offers an exciting and intensive exploration of the Gothic aesthetic in British culture of the long eighteenth century. Particular topics of focus include the numerous meanings of the term ‘Gothic’ in the period, Gothic history and historiography, Gothic literature, architecture, interiors and visual art.  Intended as an accessible introduction to the rich and varie

Horror Studies – New Series Thumbnail

Horror Studies – New Series

Posted by Xavier Aldana Reyes on January 18, 2016 in News tagged with

    NEW SERIES – HORROR STUDIES   The Horror Studies series from the University of Wales Press is the first series ever exclusively dedicated to the study of the genre in all its various manifestations. The new series aims to explore the steady and ever-growing interest in Horror – from fiction to cinema and television, stuff magazines to comics, stomach and stretching to other forms of narrative texts such as video games or music. Horror Studies aims to raise the profile of Horror in the process of institutionalising its academic study by providing a publishing home

Registration Open: M. R. James Conference, 19th March Thumbnail

Registration Open: M. R. James Conference, 19th March

Posted by Matt Foley on January 13, 2016 in Blog tagged with ,

Registration is now open for the one-day M.R. James conference 'Haunted Studies: The Ghost Stories of M. R. James', which takes place in Leeds on the 19th March. The fascinating programme for the day can be found here.   Please see the conference website below for registration details: https://mrjconference.wordpress.com/registration-2/

CfP: Gothic short stories for ‘Temporal Discombobulations’ collection Thumbnail

CfP: Gothic short stories for ‘Temporal Discombobulations’ collection

Posted by Matt Foley on January 11, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , , , , ,

Call For Fiction: Gothic And Time More information: https://temporaldiscombobulations.wordpress.com/call-for-submissions-short-fiction-anthology/   Call for short works of fiction for the digital anthology Temporal Discombobulations. Temporal Discombobulations calls for original contemporary fiction that pays homage to the Gothic with ‘time’ as the theme. The Gothic experience is one founded in time. A past that will not or cannot die, pilule multiple presents that can never resolved, check or infinite futures that can never be realized, buy the Gothic speaks of a temporal ex

‘The stage is set, the curtain rises… we are ready to begin’: BBC’s Sherlock Special ‘The Abominable Bride’, 19th-Century Theatre and the Gothic Thumbnail

‘The stage is set, the curtain rises… we are ready to begin’: BBC’s Sherlock Special ‘The Abominable Bride’, 19th-Century Theatre and the Gothic

Posted by Sarah A. Winter on January 09, 2016 in Blog, Sarah Winter tagged with , , , , , ,

(Many plot spoilers ‘afoot’)   My last blog looked into how Victorian theatre was imagined in the first season of Sky’s Penny Dreadful. After viewing BBC’s Sherlock one-off special episode ‘The Abominable Bride’ (2016), sickness I was very interested in how, medicine like Penny Dreadful, view the Victorian theatre world was re-created in contemporary entertainment. Along with the incorporation of theatrical terms and techniques, I was also struck by how intricately the writers and production team deployed the Gothic. Instead of solely providing the dark setting and narrat

Book Review: Silma Hill by Iain Maloney Thumbnail

Book Review: Silma Hill by Iain Maloney

Posted by Neil Syme on January 04, 2016 in Blog, Reviews tagged with

Silma Hill by Iain Maloney (Glasgow: Freight Books, order 2015) Review by Neil Syme While it may initially seem designed to fulfil certain Scottish Gothic criteria, Iain Maloney’s highly readable Silma Hill (2015) follows a more original path that might be expected. The rural late-18th century Scottish setting is familiar but well drawn; geographically isolated from progressive Edinburgh and replete with mysterious stone circle, the parochial and increasingly paranoid villagers struggle (at least at first) with the clash between Calvinism and superstition. As in such classics of Scottish

A Gothic symbol of welcome, or wealth Thumbnail

A Gothic symbol of welcome, or wealth

Posted by Peter Lindfield on December 17, 2015 in Blog, Peter Lindfield tagged with , , , ,

The pineapple is thought to have been discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1493 in the Caribbean. In Georgian Britain the fruit was a symbol of wealth — given the expense needed to import or grow it — and the fruit’s distinctive form was placed at the entrances to estates. Its importance as a centrepiece in this regard is ably illustrated by Charles Williams' The cabinet dinner, or, A political meeting : an illustrious way of enjoying a friend (1804). Probably the most spectacular, though little known, example of a pineapple’s use to articulate breeding (pedigree), wealth an

Dances of the dead: the victims’ ball, Gothic fashion and entertainment of late 18th century France Thumbnail

Dances of the dead: the victims’ ball, Gothic fashion and entertainment of late 18th century France

Posted by Fanny Lacôte on December 15, 2015 in Blog, Fanny Lacôte tagged with , , , , ,

Parisian society after the Terror The 27th of July 1794, a.k.a. 9 Thermidor: Maximilien de Robespierre is arrested. The blade of the guillotine falling on his neck symbolises the end of the Terror in post-revolutionary France. As the prisons open their gates to release the prisoners awaiting the guillotine, French people start to breathe again, and thus, they start to dance in celebration of life. Contemporary accounts relate the bloom of numerous dancing societies. As the Goncourt brothers have written in their history of French society under the Directory, “la France danse”, “Fra

CfP: The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies 2016 Thumbnail

CfP: The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies 2016

Posted by Matt Foley on December 10, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , , ,

The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies is currently seeking submissions for Issue #15, ed to be published in late Summer 2016.   The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies is an annual, scholarly, peer-reviewed, open-access journal focusing on all aspects of the gothic and horror genres. Article submissions should be 5-7000 words and must follow the MHRA style guide. Reviews of fiction, scholarly books, films, television programmes, conferences, and new-media texts, as well as relevant interviews, should be no more than 1000 words in length.   Article Deadline: 1st Marc