Derek Quint’s Filmic Adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s “Salome”

Posted by Dale Townshend on December 07, 2012 in News tagged with

Even after all these years, Salome still dances for the head of John the Baptist.

Adapted from the 1891 play of the same name by Oscar Wilde, this experimental art film takes creative ques from a number of sources–Babylonian wall reliefs to Flemish Renaissance paintings to Robert Mapplethorpe photographs–in order to create a bizarre and hallucinagenic viewing experience.

Chicago indie director Derek Quint says, “‘Salome’ is an old story that’s been told innumberable times through different mediums. I saw the story differently because of the Oscar Wilde play and I wanted to express these characters in a way that is rarely done. My goal was to emphasize the isolation of the title character and how emotional experience lead her to do what she does to the holy man. Salome is always portrayed as this fire-breathing femme fatale but, in the Wilde play, she’s shown in a completely different light. I wanted to stick close to the spirit of how she and the John the Baptist character were envisioned by Oscar Wilde. I love this story and it was great to be able to do a short film adaptation that can be viewed by anyone anywhere. That’s what makes the internet so great. The names and story associated with ‘Salome’ are kind of stuck in the back of the mind of pop culture but not everyone is familiar with how they all piece together or what exactly happens in the story. Now they can watch my short film and see a quick adaptation that keeps all the major details. The film is pretty weird which suits the surreal mood that’s established within the play.”

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