Bram Stoker’s Notes for Dracula

Posted by Dale Townshend on August 19, 2008 in News tagged with

Many of you will be interested to know that  Bram Stoker’s Notes for Dracula: A Facsimile Edition –  with transcriptions, annotations and commentary by Robert Eighteen-Bisang and Elizabeth Miller has now been published.  (Jefferson NC and London by McFarland).

 
You will find details about the book at:
 
http:///www.blooferland.com/drc  [Dracula Research Centre]
http://www.ucs.mun.ca/~emiller  [Dracula’s homepage]

Tiny URL for this post: http://tinyurl.com/349o4y4

About the Author – Dale Townshend

has written 316 articles on The Gothic Imagination.

I have published widely within the field of Gothic studies, including the monograph _The Orders of Gothic: Foucault, Lacan, and the Subject of Gothic Writing, 1764-1820_ (AMS, 2007); _Gothic Shakespeares_ (with John Drakakis; Routeldge, 2008); _Macbeth: A Critical Reader_ (with John Drakakis; Bloomsbury, 2014); _The Gothic World_ (with Glennis Byron; Routledge, 2014); _Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism and the Gothic_ (with Angela Wright; Cambridge University Press, 2014); and _Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination_ (British Library, 2014). The latter arises out of my involvement, as academic advisor, on the major exhibition of that name at the British Library (October 2014-January 2015). Forthcoming publications include _Romantic Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion_ (with Angela Wright; EUP, forthcoming 2015) and _Writing Britain's Ruins, 1700--1850_ (with Michael Carter and Peter Lindfield; contracted to British Library Publishing, forthcoming 2017). My current monograph project, _Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance and the Architectural Imagination, 1760–1840, seeks to provide a sustained critical account of the complex but hitherto relatively unexplored relationship between literary texts and architectural structures in British Romantic-era writing.

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Bram Stoker’s Notes for Dracula

Posted by Dale Townshend on October 25, 2007 in News tagged with

Elizabeth Miller and Robert Eighteen-Bisang are publishing an annotated facsimile edition of Stoker’s Dracula notes with McFarland in early 2008. The MacFarlane website explains how this neglected material has at last been analysed and published. This text includes Stoker’s own handwritten comments and details his research and materials. The knowledge and experience of Miller and Eighteen-Bisang enrich this collection which details the creation of Dracula. Consult the MacFarlane website for further information detailing the text and the authors. It is also possible to pre-order the text here.

Tiny URL for this post: http://tinyurl.com/349o4y4

About the Author – Dale Townshend

has written 316 articles on The Gothic Imagination.

I have published widely within the field of Gothic studies, including the monograph _The Orders of Gothic: Foucault, Lacan, and the Subject of Gothic Writing, 1764-1820_ (AMS, 2007); _Gothic Shakespeares_ (with John Drakakis; Routeldge, 2008); _Macbeth: A Critical Reader_ (with John Drakakis; Bloomsbury, 2014); _The Gothic World_ (with Glennis Byron; Routledge, 2014); _Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism and the Gothic_ (with Angela Wright; Cambridge University Press, 2014); and _Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination_ (British Library, 2014). The latter arises out of my involvement, as academic advisor, on the major exhibition of that name at the British Library (October 2014-January 2015). Forthcoming publications include _Romantic Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion_ (with Angela Wright; EUP, forthcoming 2015) and _Writing Britain's Ruins, 1700--1850_ (with Michael Carter and Peter Lindfield; contracted to British Library Publishing, forthcoming 2017). My current monograph project, _Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance and the Architectural Imagination, 1760–1840, seeks to provide a sustained critical account of the complex but hitherto relatively unexplored relationship between literary texts and architectural structures in British Romantic-era writing.

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