Reviews

All hail Final Girls! Review of The Monster (2016, Bertino) Thumbnail

All hail Final Girls! Review of The Monster (2016, Bertino)

Posted by Tanja Jurković on May 26, 2017 in Reviews, Tanja Jurkovic tagged with

  Usually when I need some sort of inspiration, I find a list of movies and randomly choose one based on the movie’s cover. I am using that somewhat overrated approach: if the cover looks good then it must be good! Of course, that is not always the case. Nevertheless, in the case of The Monster (2016, Bertino), it was. It was good. And quite enjoyable.  The film starts with a story of a divorced young mother (Zoe Kezino) and her preadolescent daughter (Ella Ballentine), who seems to have all the bad luck in her young life. She is not a child, she is forced

Review: Post-Millennial Gothic: Comedy, Romance and the Rise of Happy Gothic Thumbnail

Review: Post-Millennial Gothic: Comedy, Romance and the Rise of Happy Gothic

Posted by Donna Mitchell on April 22, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Post-Millennial Gothic: Comedy, Romance and the Rise of Happy Gothic Catherine Spooner New York: Continuum Publishing Corporation, 2017. ISBN: 978-1-4411-5390-6 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Spooner’s study begins by bringing the reader’s attention to the fact that funny, romantic, and celebratory aspects of the Gothic text have long been ignored. Focusing on the summer of 2012 as a starting point for the rise of post-millennial Gothic’s popularity in terms of its increasing social and cultural omnipresence, she coins the phrase ‘happy Gothic’ as an umbrella term to describe the

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 05, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction Gina Wisker Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-137-30348-6 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell In the introduction to her latest monograph, Gina Wisker defines contemporary women’s Gothic writing as the ‘subversive granddaughter of eighteenth-century Gothic fiction’ (Wisker 27) due to its ability to mix horror and fantasy, liberate forbidden desires, and expose repressed or hidden secrets from the past. Her study brings attention to the many essential links between feminist perspectives / critiques and contemporary women’s Gothic writi

Review: Horror: A Literary History Thumbnail

Review: Horror: A Literary History

Posted by Carly Stevenson on January 21, 2017 in Blog, Carly Stevenson, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

According to Reyes, the ‘transmedial, transhistorical and marketable genre’ (p.8) of horror is ‘largely defined by its affective pretences’ (p.7). That is to say, horror is inextricably bound up with the sense of disgust, fear and shock experienced by the reader. This is where horror diverges from its bedfellow terror. As the first two chapters of this book elucidate, the terms horror and terror were used interchangeably in seminal Gothic documents such as Edmund Burke’s A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, Anna Laetitia Aikin’s ‘On

Review: Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion Thumbnail

Review: Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion

Posted by Donna Mitchell on August 09, 2016 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion Edited by Avril Horner and Sue Zlosnik Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, pilule 2016. ISBN: 978-0-7486-9912-4 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell A welcome addition to the field of Gothic criticism, decease Horner and Zlosnik’s Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion mixes established classics of the canon with recent films, patient novels and video games, and examines them through the lens of feminist and/or post-feminist theory. The main purpose of this study is not only to explore how the representation of women and identity in the Gothic h

Review: Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain Thumbnail

Review: Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain

Posted by Donna Mitchell on May 20, 2016 in Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain Melissa Edmundson Makala Cardiff: University of Wales Press, pharm 2013. ISBN: 978-0-70832-564-3 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Melissa Edmundson Makala begins her study of women’s ghost writing in nineteenth-century Britain by considering the various reasons for its increasing popularity, thumb most notably its ability to function as a subversive means of discussing political and social issues. She notes that the nature of this genre allowed writers to explore the social tensions and inequalities which existed for certain groups without

Review: ‘Reimagining the Gothic: Monsters and Monstrosities’ symposium, 6th May 2016 Thumbnail

Review: ‘Reimagining the Gothic: Monsters and Monstrosities’ symposium, 6th May 2016

Posted by Amy Bride on May 19, 2016 in Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

‘Monster’ is a jointly allusive and ubiquitous term. For gothic scholars, ailment what constitutes monstrosity is a vast and varied spectrum of physical abnormality, capsule genetic hybridity, moral corruption, and everything in between. Yet for almost 200 years perceptions of the gothic monster in the popular imagination have been dominated by Mary Shelley and her life-creating doctor who has transcended literary boundaries to become a cultural icon in his own right. The task of re-analysing the gothic monster, both in conversation and contrast with Shelley’s creation, was that addres

Review: Frankenstein at the Royal Opera House Thumbnail

Review: Frankenstein at the Royal Opera House

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on May 19, 2016 in Evan Hayles Gledhill, Reviews tagged with , , ,

First, a preface. The last time I voluntarily watched a full dance production, it was Edward Scissorhands, and I hated the hedges. I generally plonk myself on the sofa for The Nutcracker at Christmas just for the Cossacks, which is my favourite bit. I am not a traditional dance fan; I tend to only watch a story I have a narrative interest in, otherwise I cherry pick sequences to be enthralled by the marvellous grace and athleticism of the dance. So, this is not a ballet review, it’s a Frankenstein review. I saw the new Liam Scarlett production in the cinema, as I missed out on affordable

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon Thumbnail

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon

Posted by Benjamin E. Noad on May 09, 2016 in Ben Noad, Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , , ,

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, link Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon edited by Linnie Blake and Xavier Aldana Reyes (New York and London: I. B. Tauris & Co., viagra 2016) This recent edited collection channels a political urgency that beckons further attention to the stylistics, nuances and cultural significance of global horror cinema. The essays it contains are inspired, richly detailed and are, in a word that may do justice to the entirety of the collection as a whole, haunting. The most immediate effect of this inquiry is realised in Blake and Reyes’s

Review: Gothic Tourism (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: Gothic Tourism (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 21, 2016 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Gothic Tourism Emma McEvoy Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, hospital 2016. ISBN: 978-1-137-39128-5 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Emma McEvoy’s study of Gothic tourism opens with a personal account of her experience of a scare attraction in the form of Alton Towers’ ‘The Sanctuary’. Noting the narrative structure of the tour as well as the many visual, kinetic, and auditory effects, she presents it as an example of Gothic tourism, which according to her interpretation, is ‘the act of visiting, for the purposes of leisure, a location that is presented in terms of the Gothic’ (McEvoy 20