Evan Hayles Gledhill

Review: Frankenstein at the Royal Opera House Thumbnail

Review: Frankenstein at the Royal Opera House

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on May 19, 2016 in Evan Hayles Gledhill, Reviews tagged with , , ,

First, a preface. The last time I voluntarily watched a full dance production, it was Edward Scissorhands, and I hated the hedges. I generally plonk myself on the sofa for The Nutcracker at Christmas just for the Cossacks, which is my favourite bit. I am not a traditional dance fan; I tend to only watch a story I have a narrative interest in, otherwise I cherry pick sequences to be enthralled by the marvellous grace and athleticism of the dance. So, this is not a ballet review, it’s a Frankenstein review. I saw the new Liam Scarlett production in the cinema, as I missed out on affordable

Fear Horror and Terror! CfP alert Thumbnail

Fear Horror and Terror! CfP alert

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on April 06, 2016 in Evan Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , ,

This is a call for presentations, and an introduction to the project as it stands. The deadline for the CfP is 15th April 2016, so please do share it widely and quickly! This event will be 10th Annual International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Fear Horror and Terror, organised by Inter-disiplinary.net. It is my second as project lead. First, the details - what is this CfP about?? Dates: Friday 9th September – Sunday 11th September 2016 Location: Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom   Fear, Horror and Terror can be seen as the defining experiences and political tools

Machine Language and the Gothic – signal, noise, atmosphere Thumbnail

Machine Language and the Gothic – signal, noise, atmosphere

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on August 15, 2015 in Blog, Evan Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , , , , , , ,

We often think of scholars and practitioners of the creative arts and humanities as very different to coders and system engineers, yet they share much in their approach to language and communication. Many people have heard the joke about the eggs and the milk, which relies upon the linguistic tick of logical dependencies. A humanities scholar or author will enjoy the linguistic turn as well as a programmer – we all understand the structures of language, and enjoy playing with the quirks of the system. Many of us interdisciplinary scholars who have worked in the digital humanities or the me

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience Thumbnail

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on February 07, 2015 in Blog, Evan Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Gothic became a self-parodying genre very quickly: Jane Austen wrote the self-reflexive Northanger Abbey in 1798, though it did not see publication for nearly twenty years after that. Two hundred years later, the gothic has expanded and adapted, and a mocking inter-textual awareness is a key quality for the popularity of the genre. The audience for this fiction has long been perceived as skewing feminine, as is recognized and critiqued in Austen’s work. The modern southern gothic of True Blood (2007-2014), and American gothic Supernatural (2005-ongoing), also recognize a majority female fan