Elizabeth Bobbitt

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen Thumbnail

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on June 30, 2015 in Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , , , ,

For my final blog, I would like to examine my actual process of adaptation more closely, in order to discuss the practical steps which I undertook in transposing Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho into the format of a script for television. In doing so, I will be referring back to the excerpt of my adaptation which I posted in my last blog. For those of you who did not have a chance to read it, here it is again: EPISODE 1, SCENE 4 FADE IN: INT. EMILY’S BED CHAMBER- MIDNIGHT. The only light in Emily’s chamber emanates from the meagre glow of several candles on the mantelpiece

An ‘Obscure and Terrible’ Place: Restructuring Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ for the TV Screen Thumbnail

An ‘Obscure and Terrible’ Place: Restructuring Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ for the TV Screen

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on June 05, 2015 in Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , , ,

 In my last blog on my six-part adaptation of Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho for TV, vialis 40mg I discussed the way in which Radcliffe’s text demands significant restructuring in order to render it suitable for a visual re-representation of the romance for a modern audience. I first stumbled upon Radcliffe’s work during my initial reading of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey when I was 15 years old. As many of you will know who have read—or attempted to read—a Radcliffe novel, the experience can be somewhat daunting, and, needless to say, rather unlike Catherine Morla

Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’: An Adaptation for Television Thumbnail

Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’: An Adaptation for Television

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on May 27, 2015 in Blog, Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , ,

Earlier this month, I was lucky enough to attend the University of Sheffield’s symposium on Re-Imagining the Gothic, in which speakers shared the ways in which they have creatively re-engaged with the genre through their own insights and projects. During the symposium, I was particularly struck by the sheer variety of mediums and methods through which other speakers re-represented the Gothic. We watched several short films, read creative responses to Gothic novels, and listened to the re-telling of regional Lancashire folk tales--to name a few of the excellent projects on display. Stand