Donna Mitchell

CFP: Global Fantastika Thumbnail

CFP: Global Fantastika

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 21, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell tagged with ,

Fantastika Journal Call for Papers for Global Fantastika Edition “Fantastika”, coined by John Clute, is an umbrella term which incorporates the genres of fantasy, science fiction, and horror, but can also include alternative histories, steampunk, young adult fiction, or any other imaginative space. The third annual Fantastika conference focused on productions of Fantastika globally, as well as considering themes of contact across nations and borders within Fantastika. We are now seeking to supplement extended conference papers with other work in order to publish a special edition of F

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 05, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction Gina Wisker Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-137-30348-6 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell In the introduction to her latest monograph, Gina Wisker defines contemporary women’s Gothic writing as the ‘subversive granddaughter of eighteenth-century Gothic fiction’ (Wisker 27) due to its ability to mix horror and fantasy, liberate forbidden desires, and expose repressed or hidden secrets from the past. Her study brings attention to the many essential links between feminist perspectives / critiques and contemporary women’s Gothic writi

Official Launch of The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS) Thumbnail

Official Launch of The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on December 15, 2016 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, News tagged with

The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS): Official Launch Event, viagra 60mg Trinity College Dublin, rx January 21st 2017. The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS) is a new collective of Irish-based scholars working on all aspects of the gothic and the horror genres. Members can focus on topics from any time period, whether produced in Ireland or elsewhere, including literature, film, television, new media, the visual arts, the fine arts, archival research, music, and history. The network will be formally launched in the Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin, on Saturday, January 21s

Review: Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion Thumbnail

Review: Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion

Posted by Donna Mitchell on August 09, 2016 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion Edited by Avril Horner and Sue Zlosnik Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, pilule 2016. ISBN: 978-0-7486-9912-4 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell A welcome addition to the field of Gothic criticism, decease Horner and Zlosnik’s Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion mixes established classics of the canon with recent films, patient novels and video games, and examines them through the lens of feminist and/or post-feminist theory. The main purpose of this study is not only to explore how the representation of women and identity in the Gothic h

CFP: Fantastika Journal Thumbnail

CFP: Fantastika Journal

Posted by Donna Mitchell on May 30, 2016 in Donna Mitchell tagged with ,

Fantastika Journal Call for Papers for First Special Edition Issue  “Fantastika” – a term appropriated from a range of Slavonic languages by John Clute – embraces the genres of fantasy, pills science fiction, and horror, but can also include alternative histories, gothic, steampunk, young adult dystopian fiction, or any other radically imaginative narrative space. The goal of Fantastika Journal is to bring together academics and researchers who share an interest in this diverse range of fields with the aim of opening up new dialogues, productive controversies and collaborations. We

Review: Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain Thumbnail

Review: Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain

Posted by Donna Mitchell on May 20, 2016 in Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain Melissa Edmundson Makala Cardiff: University of Wales Press, pharm 2013. ISBN: 978-0-70832-564-3 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Melissa Edmundson Makala begins her study of women’s ghost writing in nineteenth-century Britain by considering the various reasons for its increasing popularity, thumb most notably its ability to function as a subversive means of discussing political and social issues. She notes that the nature of this genre allowed writers to explore the social tensions and inequalities which existed for certain groups without

Review: Gothic Tourism (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: Gothic Tourism (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 21, 2016 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Gothic Tourism Emma McEvoy Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, hospital 2016. ISBN: 978-1-137-39128-5 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Emma McEvoy’s study of Gothic tourism opens with a personal account of her experience of a scare attraction in the form of Alton Towers’ ‘The Sanctuary’. Noting the narrative structure of the tour as well as the many visual, kinetic, and auditory effects, she presents it as an example of Gothic tourism, which according to her interpretation, is ‘the act of visiting, for the purposes of leisure, a location that is presented in terms of the Gothic’ (McEvoy 20

Review: Women and Domestic Space in Contemporary Gothic Narratives: The House as Subject Thumbnail

Review: Women and Domestic Space in Contemporary Gothic Narratives: The House as Subject

Posted by Donna Mitchell on November 19, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Women and Domestic Space in Contemporary Gothic Narratives: The House as Subject. Andrew Hock Soon Ng Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-137-53681-5 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Hock Soon Ng approaches the subject of the house in Gothic narratives with two intentions; he wishes firstly, to identify and expose the intimate link between the text’s female subject and the house, and secondly, to explore how this link’s complex dimension indirectly reveals the ambiguity that characterises the latter. Concentrating on the interiority of the house that not only makes it a home

Review: The Twilight of the Gothic? Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance (Winner of the Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for best book in Gothic criticism) Thumbnail

Review: The Twilight of the Gothic? Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance (Winner of the Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for best book in Gothic criticism)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on September 25, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Twilight of the Gothic?: Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance. Joseph Crawford. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, order 2014. ISBN: 978-1-78316-064-8 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Winner of the Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for the best book in Gothic criticism, ambulance Joseph Crawford’s The Twilight of the Gothic?: Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance traces the historical development and rise in popularity of the paranormal romance and examines the reasons behind the divisive reactions to the genre. He begins by identifying three phases in its

Review: Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic Thumbnail

Review: Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic

Posted by Donna Mitchell on July 02, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic. By Rebecca Munford. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013. ISBN: 978-0-7190-7671-8 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Perhaps inspired by Carter’s claim that ‘[c]ontradictions are the only things that make any sense’[i], Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic sees Rebecca Munford take on the daunting task of examining the feminist dialogue in Carter’s texts through a masculinist lineage of European Gothic writers. She justifies her reasons for the unusual combination b