Ann Bradley

Maternal Community and Paternal Abandonment in Faulkner and Morrison Thumbnail

Maternal Community and Paternal Abandonment in Faulkner and Morrison

Posted by Ann Bradley on February 18, 2016 in Ann Bradley, Blog tagged with , , , ,

If trauma is not dealt with, recognized and communicated, then it has the potential to haunt the sufferer in the form of flashbacks. Absalom, Absalom! and Beloved go a step further than flashbacks. The individuals are haunted by living manifestations of their trauma. If those ghosts are to be exorcised however, it stands to reason that they would still need to be talked through, which requires a receptive community. The people who surround Sethe and Sutpen respectively have just as much to do with the end of the novel as the ghosts do. Their reactions to the spectres and the haunted det

Beloved and Charles Bon: Excess and Absence Thumbnail

Beloved and Charles Bon: Excess and Absence

Posted by Ann Bradley on February 11, 2016 in Ann Bradley, Blog tagged with , , , ,

The horrors that William Faulkner depicts in his novel, Absalom, Absalom! are general, pointing to a the fact that the South is built by the labour and death of women and slaves. This terrible mode of construction haunts the characters of the novel. Morrison’s work illustrates this same awful truth. “Beloved pictures American history as a haunted house, from which slavery’s legacy of grief and horror cannot be exorcised. The United States, as many American Gothic texts argue, is built on economic exploitation and racial terror” (Goddu 63-64). Unlike Absalom, Beloved focuses on the trau

Southern Gothic: A Traumatic Haunting Thumbnail

Southern Gothic: A Traumatic Haunting

Posted by Ann Bradley on February 05, 2016 in Ann Bradley, Blog tagged with , , , ,

Gothic literature in all of its permutations connects with the anxieties of the time, reflecting fears in the form of haunting. Southern Gothic is no exception. Just as traditional Gothic texts point out hypocrisies of religious systems or the like, American Gothic novels note the injustices of the region in which they are set. “The old antebellum South was nothing but myth, and its narrative of a supposedly halcyon past concealed all manner of social, familial and of course racial denials and suppressions […] Southern Gothic set to work by exposing their abuses and silences” (Walsh