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Review: Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic Thumbnail

Review: Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic

Posted by Donna Mitchell on July 02, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic. By Rebecca Munford. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013. ISBN: 978-0-7190-7671-8 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Perhaps inspired by Carter’s claim that ‘[c]ontradictions are the only things that make any sense’[i], Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic sees Rebecca Munford take on the daunting task of examining the feminist dialogue in Carter’s texts through a masculinist lineage of European Gothic writers. She justifies her reasons for the unusual combination b

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen Thumbnail

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on June 30, 2015 in Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , , , ,

For my final blog, I would like to examine my actual process of adaptation more closely, in order to discuss the practical steps which I undertook in transposing Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho into the format of a script for television. In doing so, I will be referring back to the excerpt of my adaptation which I posted in my last blog. For those of you who did not have a chance to read it, here it is again: EPISODE 1, SCENE 4 FADE IN: INT. EMILY’S BED CHAMBER- MIDNIGHT. The only light in Emily’s chamber emanates from the meagre glow of several candles on the mantel

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) Thumbnail

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014)

Posted by Matt Foley on June 24, 2015 in Blog, Carly Stevenson, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) By Carly Stevenson (University of Sheffield)   This debut from British-born, Iranian-American writer-director Ana Lily Amirpour is at once nostalgic and innovative in its approach to the ever-popular (and some might say oversaturated) vampire motif. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night assimilates a wealth of classic horror imagery: the jerky body movements and monochromatic aesthetic give the film a surreal quality reminiscent of Nosferatu and The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari. And yet, this nod to early European horror contrasts with more co

Allan Lloyd Smith Prize: Monograph Shortlist Thumbnail

Allan Lloyd Smith Prize: Monograph Shortlist

Posted by Matt Foley on June 12, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , ,

The Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize 2015: Monograph Shortlist   Please find below the shortlist for the 2015 Allan Lloyd Smith monograph prize – decided upon by the IGA’s monograph prize committee.   Monograph Shortlist 2015   Joseph Crawford. The Twilight of the Gothic? Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance, 1991-2012 (University of Wales Press, 2014)                   Rebecca Munford. Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic (Manchester UP, 2013)

An ‘Obscure and Terrible’ Place: Restructuring Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ for the TV Screen Thumbnail

An ‘Obscure and Terrible’ Place: Restructuring Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ for the TV Screen

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on June 05, 2015 in Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , , ,

 In my last blog on my six-part adaptation of Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho for TV, I discussed the way in which Radcliffe’s text demands significant restructuring in order to render it suitable for a visual re-representation of the romance for a modern audience. I first stumbled upon Radcliffe’s work during my initial reading of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey when I was 15 years old. As many of you will know who have read—or attempted to read—a Radcliffe novel, the experience can be somewhat daunting, and, needless to say, rather unlike Catherine Morland’s breathless

The Grotesque Orgasm: Gothic’s Dirtiest Trick. Thumbnail

The Grotesque Orgasm: Gothic’s Dirtiest Trick.

Posted by Danielle Hancock on June 01, 2015 in Blog, Danielle Hancock tagged with , , , , , ,

Note: This post contains sexually explicit language.   “The grotesque orgasm” is a phrase that’s been lurking in my mind for a long time - since some friends and myself admitted to getting hot under the collar during parts of Brett Easton Ellis' American Psycho, only to be bodily horrified at the next line. Simply, American Psycho constituted  some of the most bluntly provocative literature we'd ever read, with the unhappiest endings we’d ever experienced. Let me give you an example: [here imagine the antics of an explicit 2.5 page consensual three-person sex scene, build

Gothic Research Showcase: Stirling July 18th 2015

Posted by Benjamin E. Noad on May 27, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , , ,

In what is hoped will be a unique and fascinating event several of the University of Stirling’s postgraduate researchers have teamed up with the charity “Epilepsy Scotland” in order to showcase their passion, interests and talents as they convey their lively and diverse critical explorations of the Gothic mode. On Saturday July 18th at The Playhouse, (hosted by the Macrobert Arts Centre), 11am-3pm,  a series of interactive talks, readings and workshops will be offered to the public in an imaginative exhibit highlighting how Gothic literary and cinematic concerns manifest outside of the

Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho': An Adaptation for Television Thumbnail

Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho': An Adaptation for Television

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on May 27, 2015 in Blog, Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , ,

Earlier this month, I was lucky enough to attend the University of Sheffield’s symposium on Re-Imagining the Gothic, in which speakers shared the ways in which they have creatively re-engaged with the genre through their own insights and projects. During the symposium, I was particularly struck by the sheer variety of mediums and methods through which other speakers re-represented the Gothic. We watched several short films, read creative responses to Gothic novels, and listened to the re-telling of regional Lancashire folk tales--to name a few of the excellent projects on display. Standin

GOTHIC AT THE GOTT Thumbnail

GOTHIC AT THE GOTT

Posted by Dr David Annwn Jones on May 07, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , , , , , ,

  The literary Gothic did not emerge ex nihilo; rather it drew on well-established cultural meanings and    a long-standing interest in the Gothic which were developed largely within the antiquarian traditions. I’d like to place Rosemary Sweet’s compelling observation at the head of this post about the Gothic and the new Gott Collection at the Hepworth Gallery. It is a statement which is consistently borne out in the study of this fine collection of engravings and watercolours. I’d also like to thank Dale Townshend here for his kind invitation to make this exciting resourc

Horror Podcasting and Zombie Radio – A Special Kind of Creepy Thumbnail

Horror Podcasting and Zombie Radio – A Special Kind of Creepy

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 30, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Radio is the ghost-trace behind every iTune. If video killed the radio (star), iPod was born of its remnants - taking the best and leaving the rest. iPod, that anti domestic, anti-connective, personalised sound-bubble machine, jettisoned all that made radio both homely and, (as the homely often is), cloying, intrusive, and restrictive. iPod gave not only mobility but freedom from advert breaks (or at least the option to fast-forward), time schedules, crappy songs, DJ waffle, knob-twiddling and crackling reception. We moved on from radio, our dead friend. So beneath our streamlined podcasts