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GOTHIC AT THE GOTT Thumbnail

GOTHIC AT THE GOTT

Posted by Dr David Annwn Jones on May 07, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , , , , , ,

  The literary Gothic did not emerge ex nihilo; rather it drew on well-established cultural meanings and    a long-standing interest in the Gothic which were developed largely within the antiquarian traditions. I’d like to place Rosemary Sweet’s compelling observation at the head of this post about the Gothic and the new Gott Collection at the Hepworth Gallery. It is a statement which is consistently borne out in the study of this fine collection of engravings and watercolours. I’d also like to thank Dale Townshend here for his kind invitation to make this exciting resourc

Horror Podcasting and Zombie Radio – A Special Kind of Creepy Thumbnail

Horror Podcasting and Zombie Radio – A Special Kind of Creepy

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 30, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Radio is the ghost-trace behind every iTune. If video killed the radio (star), iPod was born of its remnants - taking the best and leaving the rest. iPod, that anti domestic, anti-connective, personalised sound-bubble machine, jettisoned all that made radio both homely and, (as the homely often is), cloying, intrusive, and restrictive. iPod gave not only mobility but freedom from advert breaks (or at least the option to fast-forward), time schedules, crappy songs, DJ waffle, knob-twiddling and crackling reception. We moved on from radio, our dead friend. So beneath our streamlined podcasts

Welcome Friends:  Horror Podcasting’s overthrow of the Mobile, Private iPod. Thumbnail

Welcome Friends: Horror Podcasting’s overthrow of the Mobile, Private iPod.

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 16, 2015 in Danielle Hancock tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Camp-fire tales and oral spook-tales aren’t just about sharing voices, they are also about sharing space. Faintly-lit faces in the darkness, making strange the presence of other humans, crowded around a beacon of light: a rough-shod, impermanent domestic in the wilderness, with goodness knows what watching from the shadows. There’s a thrill to be had in probing the limitations of the firelight’s safety, and in the uncertainty of one’s company; transformed by the stories and their in/visibility. The same is true of fireside ghost-tales, and Golden Era radio-horror listening: the fam

Horror Podcasting: Cyber Folktales at the Digital Campfire Thumbnail

Horror Podcasting: Cyber Folktales at the Digital Campfire

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 09, 2015 in Blog, Danielle Hancock tagged with , , , , ,

This is a blogpost about precisely what it cannot provide - a sense of sound, tone and rhythm; a lone voice to be shared with a group. So, for a moment, try to forget the page.   And listen with me.   Chords are struck on a banjo, a low voice tells a homespun tale, short but enthralling in its horror and simplicity; they assure us that this story is absolutely, one-hundred percent true, that it really happened to the teller, or his friend, or his friend’s friend; at the story’s close, those banjo notes return, alongside the invitation to tell your own creepy story, to listene

Carmilla Rising: Adapting Le Fanu’s Novella In the Age of Social Media Thumbnail

Carmilla Rising: Adapting Le Fanu’s Novella In the Age of Social Media

Posted by Matt Foley on March 30, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , ,

Carmilla Rising: Adapting Le Fanu’s Novella In the Age of Social Media  By Lauren Chochinov All roads lead to Bram Stoker’s Dracula, at least according to the British Library’s recent exhibition Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination. The path to Dracula is paved with early vampires, each providing important elements of what is, arguably, the most famous of all literary vampires. Thus the exhibition carefully detailed this journey, showing off its unparalleled collection of important literary treasures including the early vampire novel The Vampyre (1819) by John Polidori. Amongs

Review: The Gothic Child (The Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: The Gothic Child (The Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on March 20, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

The Gothic Child. By Margarita Georgieva. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-137-30606-7 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell  The Gothic Child offers a thoughtful and comprehensive discussion on the child in gothic literature using the genre’s treatment of this figure as an idea, concept, and/or memory within a text, as captured in Georgieva’s claim that ‘[t]he gothic world is, in fact, the world of childhood’ (Georgieva 60). Georgieva discusses the typical portrait and nature of the gothic child and traces its development both structurally and thematically by initially co

Review: Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen

Posted by Maria Cohut on March 14, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

  Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2015 ISBN-10: 1447282477 ISBN-13: 978-1447282471 Written and published on the occasion of this year's World Book Day, Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen is Chris Riddell's newest installment in the 'Goth Girl' children's series, following Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse and Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death. Unlike the previous two books, this one is considerably shorter, and also not nearly as stunning as an object: while Riddell's complex and lighthearted illustrations still provide enough for the gluttono

Scary Tales event January 17th at the British Library Thumbnail

Scary Tales event January 17th at the British Library

Posted by Stephanie Bryant on March 10, 2015 in Guest Blog, Steph Bryant, Uncategorized tagged with , , , ,

I stumbled across this event quite by accident; my initial reason for visiting was to see the Terror and Wonder exhibition being held there. At £5 I couldn’t grumble and one of my favourite authors (Chris Priestly) would be there. Taken from the British Library web page, the event was advertised as a ‘special event for young adults and older children, meet some of the most brilliant creators of Gothic and nightmarish stories’. I was intrigued. I glanced around the auditorium and saw that over 90% of the audience was adults ranging from educators, parents and students. There was a dis

Gothic Sunshine: Spanish film and the creep factor of the full light of day Thumbnail

Gothic Sunshine: Spanish film and the creep factor of the full light of day

Posted by Dale Townshend on March 06, 2015 in Blog tagged with ,

By Ann Davies, University of Stirling The Gothic mode is noted for its chill factor – and is therefore unsurprisingly antithetical to sunlight. Among the many familiar characteristics of Gothic style are greyness, mist and cold: when the sun does appear it is often labelled weak or sickly, countering the usual association of the sun with warmth and health and suggesting a malaise in the environment in which the story is set. Perhaps it's no surprise, then, that nowadays the Gothic is not readily associated with Spain, which suffers from its own clichés, notably being over-endowed with su

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire Thumbnail

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire

Posted by Matt Foley on February 19, 2015 in Blog tagged with , ,

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire By Lauren Owen, Durham University Who is Varney? He is rather overshadowed by other pre-Dracula vampires like Lord Ruthven, the Byronic villain of Polidori’s short story “The Vampyre” (1819), or Carmilla, the dangerously seductive anti-heroine of LeFanu’s 1872 novella of the same name. Varney, the Vampyre was a long-running serial probably written by James Malcolm Rymer between 1845 and 1847. (The work was also associated with Thomas Preskett Prest, who is credited with the authorship of The String of Pearls, the novel which introduced the vill