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Review: The Gothic Child (The Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: The Gothic Child (The Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on March 20, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

The Gothic Child. By Margarita Georgieva. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-137-30606-7 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell  The Gothic Child offers a thoughtful and comprehensive discussion on the child in gothic literature using the genre’s treatment of this figure as an idea, concept, and/or memory within a text, as captured in Georgieva’s claim that ‘[t]he gothic world is, in fact, the world of childhood’ (Georgieva 60). Georgieva discusses the typical portrait and nature of the gothic child and traces its development both structurally and thematically by initially co

Review: Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen

Posted by Maria Cohut on March 14, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

  Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2015 ISBN-10: 1447282477 ISBN-13: 978-1447282471 Written and published on the occasion of this year's World Book Day, Goth Girl and the Pirate Queen is Chris Riddell's newest installment in the 'Goth Girl' children's series, following Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse and Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death. Unlike the previous two books, this one is considerably shorter, and also not nearly as stunning as an object: while Riddell's complex and lighthearted illustrations still provide enough for the gluttono

Scary Tales event January 17th at the British Library Thumbnail

Scary Tales event January 17th at the British Library

Posted by Stephanie Bryant on March 10, 2015 in Guest Blog, Steph Bryant, Uncategorized tagged with , , , ,

I stumbled across this event quite by accident; my initial reason for visiting was to see the Terror and Wonder exhibition being held there. At £5 I couldn’t grumble and one of my favourite authors (Chris Priestly) would be there. Taken from the British Library web page, the event was advertised as a ‘special event for young adults and older children, meet some of the most brilliant creators of Gothic and nightmarish stories’. I was intrigued. I glanced around the auditorium and saw that over 90% of the audience was adults ranging from educators, parents and students. There was a dis

Gothic Sunshine: Spanish film and the creep factor of the full light of day Thumbnail

Gothic Sunshine: Spanish film and the creep factor of the full light of day

Posted by Dale Townshend on March 06, 2015 in Blog tagged with ,

By Ann Davies, University of Stirling The Gothic mode is noted for its chill factor – and is therefore unsurprisingly antithetical to sunlight. Among the many familiar characteristics of Gothic style are greyness, mist and cold: when the sun does appear it is often labelled weak or sickly, countering the usual association of the sun with warmth and health and suggesting a malaise in the environment in which the story is set. Perhaps it's no surprise, then, that nowadays the Gothic is not readily associated with Spain, which suffers from its own clichés, notably being over-endowed with su

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire Thumbnail

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire

Posted by Matt Foley on February 19, 2015 in Blog tagged with , ,

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire By Lauren Owen, Durham University Who is Varney? He is rather overshadowed by other pre-Dracula vampires like Lord Ruthven, the Byronic villain of Polidori’s short story “The Vampyre” (1819), or Carmilla, the dangerously seductive anti-heroine of LeFanu’s 1872 novella of the same name. Varney, the Vampyre was a long-running serial probably written by James Malcolm Rymer between 1845 and 1847. (The work was also associated with Thomas Preskett Prest, who is credited with the authorship of The String of Pearls, the novel which introduced the vill

CFP: Sonic Horror

Posted by Matt Foley on February 14, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , ,

CFP: Sonic Horror “Shh—was that a voice?” Sound is arguably one of the most fear-provoking aspects of horror. Ghost stories and horror films employ sonic tropes such as creaking floor boards, sudden loud thumps, or ephemeral children’s choirs in order to enhance suspense through the evocation of unseen terror. “The spectre of sound”, as Kevin Donnelly has called it, creeps up on us dorsally, evading the relative comfort of visual recognition. Sonic horror tropes have also been used to imbue other genres, such as musical theatre and popular music, with elements of horror. Whethe

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience Thumbnail

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience

Posted by Eva Hayles Gledhill on February 07, 2015 in Blog, Eva Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Gothic became a self-parodying genre very quickly: Jane Austen wrote the self-reflexive Northanger Abbey in 1798, though it did not see publication for nearly twenty years after that. Two hundred years later, the gothic has expanded and adapted, and a mocking inter-textual awareness is a key quality for the popularity of the genre. The audience for this fiction has long been perceived as skewing feminine, as is recognized and critiqued in Austen’s work. The modern southern gothic of True Blood (2007-2014), and American gothic Supernatural (2005-ongoing), also recognize a majority female fan

Review: Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition

Posted by Alexandra Campbell on February 06, 2015 in Alexandra Campbell tagged with , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition  By Timothy Baker  In 2001 Edinburgh University’s Polygon Press released a collection of short stories entitled Damage Land: New Scottish Gothic Fiction, bringing together stories from influential writers such as Ali Smith, Jackie Kay, John Burnside and Janice Galloway. Published barely three years after the establishment of a devolved Scottish Parliament in 1998 and appearing in the first breaths of the new millennium, the collection has been key in highlighting the pervasive nature of Gothic creative writing in Scotlan

Review: Richard Nowell (ed.) Merchants of Menace: the Business of Horror Cinema Thumbnail

Review: Richard Nowell (ed.) Merchants of Menace: the Business of Horror Cinema

Posted by Matt Foley on February 04, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , ,

Merchants of Menace: the Business of Horror Cinema. Edited by Richard Nowell New York: Bloomsbury, 2014. ISBN: 978-1-6235-6420-9 Reviewed by Ann Davies Richard Nowell’s introduction to this collection of essays is subtitled ‘There’s Gold in Them There Chills’, a phrase which summarises the common thread that unites the essays: the Gothic and horror as industry and money-making opportunity. This reflects the increasing academic interest in film production and industry more widely in Film Studies, but is in any case a different approach from the usual tendency to analyse hor

Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Sept 3rd-5th 2015: Call for Papers and Panels Thumbnail

Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Sept 3rd-5th 2015: Call for Papers and Panels

Posted by Matt Foley on January 29, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with ,

Open Graves, Open Minds: ‘The Company of Wolves’: Sociality, Animality, and Subjectivity in Literary and Cultural Narratives—Werewolves, Shapeshifters, and Feral Humans   Wolves have long been the archetypal enemy of human company, preying on the unguarded boundaries of civilisation, threatening the pastoral of ideal sociality and figuring as sexual predators. Yet, in their way, with their complex pack interactions, they have served as a model for society. Lately, this ancient enemy has been rehabilitated and reappraised, and rewilding projects have attempted to admit them more