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CFP: “Expanding the Scope of Horror” Thumbnail

CFP: “Expanding the Scope of Horror”

Posted by Matt Foley on July 31, 2015 in Blog tagged with ,

A special journal issue of Interdisciplinary Humanities Humanities Education and Research Association cuevae@uhd.edu Fall 2016: Expanding the Scope of Horror Guest Editors: Edmund Cueva and William Novak The proposed set of essays and book reviews would have as its main objective to offer a new practical model for research and analysis as an alternative to the rigid and dichotomous methodologies often used in investigations on horror. Currently, most of the scholarship either tends to situate horror on the fringe of academic research and therefore not worthy of

Vampire and Werewolf in ‘Neo-Fascist’, Occult Subcultures Thumbnail

Vampire and Werewolf in ‘Neo-Fascist’, Occult Subcultures

Posted by Matt Foley on July 31, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , , , ,

By K R Bolton K R Bolton is a Fellow of the History Dept., World Institute for Scientific Exploration. He has been published on a variety of subjects in the scholarly and general media, including: International Journal of Social Economics; International Journal of Russian Studies; Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies; India Quarterly, Istanbul Literary Review, Antrocom Journal of Anthropology; Irish Journal of Gothic & Horror Studies, etc.   Abstract Gothic, Nazism, Fascism, lycanthropy, vampirism, and Satanism: each individually evoke images of dark and repressed

Company of Wolves, 3rd-5th September 2015 Thumbnail

Company of Wolves, 3rd-5th September 2015

Posted by Kaja Franck on July 28, 2015 in Guest Blog, Kaja Franck, News tagged with , , , , , ,

In Glen Duncan's The Last Werewolf (2011), one of the characters states that 'Werewolves are not a subject for the academe'. Though this is a little sobering if you are undertaking a PhD on werewolves, I'd suggest that the past few years have shown that this is not the case. Leslie Sconduto's Metamorphoses of the Werewolf (2008) has given a classical depth to the study of lycanthropy in literature whilst Sky's Penny Dreadful (2014-) has made their sole American character, the lupine Ethan Chandler, into a twisted version of Stoker's Quincey Morris from Dracula (1887). With werewolves

Haunted Destiny: Ray Bradbury’s “The Veldt” Thumbnail

Haunted Destiny: Ray Bradbury’s “The Veldt”

Posted by Matt Foley on July 22, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , ,

Haunted Destiny Wendy Weber Céspedes (University of Costa Rica) The haunted home is probably one of the main motifs that have given rise to stories in literature. The idea that the place that should protect us as human beings turns against its inhabitants and provokes tragedy is simply a basic fear we can all identify with. Ray Bradbury depicts a similar tale in his story “The Veldt,” the account of a futuristic house rebelling against its supposed masters. Despite first impressions, the house in Ray Bradbury’s “The Veldt” is, in fact, presented to the reader as a haunted house,

Review: The Ghosts of Altona by Craig Russell Thumbnail

Review: The Ghosts of Altona by Craig Russell

Posted by Matt Foley on July 14, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , ,

Craig Russell, The Ghosts of Altona (Quercus: London, 2015) by Matt Foley Many of the nascent forms of detective fiction are well-known to be highly Gothicized, whether they be considered to be Edgar Allan Poe’s Dupin stories, Charles Dickens’ plots of criminality, or the predilection of Victorian sensation fictions – typified, for instance, by the novels of Wilkie Collins – to unveil hidden injustices. The figure of the detective, surely, fundamentally rejects coincidence and chance. They instead seek to apply the logic of causation to even the most opaque of effects. Scottish cri

Making Monsters Thumbnail

Making Monsters

Posted by Naomi Richards on July 02, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , ,

Making Monsters By Naomi Richards Margaret Atwood wrote that ‘making poison is as much fun as making a cake.’ Traditional ideas about the sources of creativity - obsession, struggle, creative wounds and all sorts of neuroses often revolve around the idea of there being Dark Materials that we are instinctively drawn to re-create. Neil Gaiman says as much in his Introduction to his short story collection Smoke and Mirrors that writing is about ‘releasing demons.’ He admits to finding stories lurking at the back of his head. For Gaiman these monsters are ideas and images he pins dow

Review: Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic Thumbnail

Review: Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic

Posted by Donna Mitchell on July 02, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic. By Rebecca Munford. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013. ISBN: 978-0-7190-7671-8 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Perhaps inspired by Carter’s claim that ‘[c]ontradictions are the only things that make any sense’[i], Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic sees Rebecca Munford take on the daunting task of examining the feminist dialogue in Carter’s texts through a masculinist lineage of European Gothic writers. She justifies her reasons for the unusual combination b

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen Thumbnail

Step by Step: Translating Ann Radcliffe’s ‘The Mysteries of Udolpho’ from Text to Screen

Posted by Elizabeth Bobbitt on June 30, 2015 in Elizabeth Bobbitt tagged with , , , , ,

For my final blog, I would like to examine my actual process of adaptation more closely, in order to discuss the practical steps which I undertook in transposing Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho into the format of a script for television. In doing so, I will be referring back to the excerpt of my adaptation which I posted in my last blog. For those of you who did not have a chance to read it, here it is again: EPISODE 1, SCENE 4 FADE IN: INT. EMILY’S BED CHAMBER- MIDNIGHT. The only light in Emily’s chamber emanates from the meagre glow of several candles on the mantel

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) Thumbnail

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014)

Posted by Matt Foley on June 24, 2015 in Blog, Carly Stevenson, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

Review: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) By Carly Stevenson (University of Sheffield)   This debut from British-born, Iranian-American writer-director Ana Lily Amirpour is at once nostalgic and innovative in its approach to the ever-popular (and some might say oversaturated) vampire motif. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night assimilates a wealth of classic horror imagery: the jerky body movements and monochromatic aesthetic give the film a surreal quality reminiscent of Nosferatu and The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari. And yet, this nod to early European horror contrasts with more co

Allan Lloyd Smith Prize: Monograph Shortlist Thumbnail

Allan Lloyd Smith Prize: Monograph Shortlist

Posted by Matt Foley on June 12, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , ,

The Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize 2015: Monograph Shortlist   Please find below the shortlist for the 2015 Allan Lloyd Smith monograph prize – decided upon by the IGA’s monograph prize committee.   Monograph Shortlist 2015   Joseph Crawford. The Twilight of the Gothic? Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance, 1991-2012 (University of Wales Press, 2014)                   Rebecca Munford. Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers: Angela Carter and European Gothic (Manchester UP, 2013)