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A Collaborative Review of the 12th Biennial International Gothic Association Conference: Gothic Migrations Thumbnail

A Collaborative Review of the 12th Biennial International Gothic Association Conference: Gothic Migrations

Posted by Kelly Gardner on August 26, 2015 in Ben Noad, Blog, Reviews tagged with , , ,

12th Biennial International Gothic Association Conference: Gothic Migrations The 12th Biennial International Gothic Association Conference was held in Vancouver, British Columbia from 28th July to 1st August 2015. A cohort from the University of Stirling was in attendance, eager to represent the University, to explore the City of Vancouver and, of course, to partake in this biennial gathering of Gothic scholars from across the globe. The theme for this year’s conference was Gothic Migrations and the conference was expertly coordinated by Dr. John Whatley of Simon Fraser University and ho

Review: Edith in the Dark @ Edinburgh Fringe Thumbnail

Review: Edith in the Dark @ Edinburgh Fringe

Posted by Matt Foley on August 25, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , ,

Review: Edith in the Dark @ The Edinburgh Fringe Festival, St Stephen's Church, Monday August 24th 2015   Among scholars and enthusiasts of Gothic literature, at least, it is well known that E. Nesbit wrote tales of terror – although she is more widely famed for children’s classics The Story of the Treasure Seekers (1899), The Railway Children (1906), The Phoenix and the Carpet (1904) and many others. Forming some of her first endeavours as a storyteller in prose, three recognised collections of grim and uncanny tales all appeared by Nesbit in the 1890s. It is only her p

Review: Datlow (ed.) Lovecraft’s Monsters (San Francisco: Tachyon, 2014) Thumbnail

Review: Datlow (ed.) Lovecraft’s Monsters (San Francisco: Tachyon, 2014)

Posted by Chloe Buckley on August 23, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , ,

The Weird Monster and Popular Culture From the vaults of cult fiction and role-playing manuals, the monsters of H.P. Lovecraft’s Weird fiction are becoming increasingly visible in popular culture, often recognized through the metonym of the tentacle. The rise of the tentacle, and of Lovecraft's fiction more generally, has been facilitated by Cthulhu, the most (in)famous of Lovecraft's monsters and the one whose name has come to be associated with the “mythos” Lovecraft inaugurated through his fiction. Before I move on to think about the volume of short stories - Lovecraft's Mon

Review: George and Hughes (eds.). Open Graves, Open Minds (Manchester: MUP, 2013) Thumbnail

Review: George and Hughes (eds.). Open Graves, Open Minds (Manchester: MUP, 2013)

Posted by Matt Foley on August 19, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , ,

REVIEW: Sam George and Bill Hughes (eds.). Open Graves, Open Minds: Representations of Vampires and the Undead from the Enlightenment to the Present (Manchester: MUP, 2013) By Matt Foley University of Stirling   Under the stewardship of Dr Sam George and Dr Bill Hughes, The Open Graves, Open Minds research project at the University of Hertfordshire has proved to be a rich and rewarding enterprise that – during its five-years of investigation – has facilitated a range of scholars to read productively many of the myriad transmutations of the vampire and the werewolf, both histor

Machine Language and the Gothic – signal, noise, atmosphere Thumbnail

Machine Language and the Gothic – signal, noise, atmosphere

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on August 15, 2015 in Blog, Evan Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , , , , , , ,

We often think of scholars and practitioners of the creative arts and humanities as very different to coders and system engineers, yet they share much in their approach to language and communication. Many people have heard the joke about the eggs and the milk, which relies upon the linguistic tick of logical dependencies. A humanities scholar or author will enjoy the linguistic turn as well as a programmer – we all understand the structures of language, and enjoy playing with the quirks of the system. Many of us interdisciplinary scholars who have worked in the digital humanities or the me

CfP: Patrick McGrath Symposium, Stirling, January 2016 Thumbnail

CfP: Patrick McGrath Symposium, Stirling, January 2016

Posted by Matt Foley on August 14, 2015 in Blog, McGrath Symposium tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Call for Papers: Asylums, Pathologies and the Themes of Madness: Patrick McGrath and his Gothic Contemporaries University of Stirling, Scotland A one-day symposium       Saturday 16th January 2016      (Abstracts due: Friday October 16th 2015)      Keynote Event During the symposium we will be delighted to invite speakers and attendees to view exhibits from the newly acquired Patrick McGrath archive at the University of Stirling’s library. Keynote Speakers Professor Lucie Armitt, University of Lincoln – author of Twentieth-Century Gothic (University of Wal

The Gothic: A theological and metaphysical literature worth exploring….? Thumbnail

The Gothic: A theological and metaphysical literature worth exploring….?

Posted by Eleanor Beal on August 11, 2015 in Blog, Eleanor Beal tagged with

In the coming weeks I am going to examine the concept of a theological Gothic, as recent research has led me down the troublesome path of trying to define how the stylistics, themes and poetics of the Gothic are often shaped by theological argument, if not belief. In particular I am interested in how the Gothic, in both its early and contemporary manifestations, has participated in the integration of orthodox Christian symbols and themes into a form of speculative theology in the public and popular imagination. Feel free to put your two pence in, I would appreciate any thoughts or recommendati

The Gothic Academy Online: Why Blog? Thumbnail

The Gothic Academy Online: Why Blog?

Posted by Matt Foley on August 10, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , , , ,

By Matt Foley and Rebecca Duncan   What is The Gothic Imagination? The Gothic Imagination website has become a lively and valuable online resource for Gothic scholarship, both in the UK and in the wider context of the international academy. The site was founded in 2007 by Glennis Byron – now Professor Emeritus at the University of Stirling – and has been run, in recent years, under the curatorship of Dr Dale Townshend and Dr Matt Foley. Since its inception, it has showcased submissions from widely read critics such as Catherine Spooner, Monica Germana and Franz Potter, and has

CfP: Haunted Europe, Leiden University, 9-10 June 2016 Thumbnail

CfP: Haunted Europe, Leiden University, 9-10 June 2016

Posted by Matt Foley on August 06, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , ,

Call for Papers Haunted Europe:  Continental Connections in English-Language Gothic Writing, Film and New Media 9 - 10 June 2016. Leiden University, The Netherlands   Keynote speakers: Professor Robert Miles (University of Victoria) Professor Roger Luckhurst (Birkbeck – University of London) Professor Tanya Krzywinska (Falmouth University) Lesley Megahey (director of the BBC film Schalken, the Painter)   The Leiden Research Institute for the Arts in Society (LUCAS) invites proposals for papers that address continental connections in English-Language Gothic Writing, Film a

CFP: The Contemporary Bad Guy, October 31, St Andrews Thumbnail

CFP: The Contemporary Bad Guy, October 31, St Andrews

Posted by Matt Foley on August 05, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , , , , , , , ,

The Contemporary Bad Guy on October 31, 2015 “Female violence is a specific brand of ferocity. It’s invasive. A girlfight is all teeth and hair, spit and nails — a much more fearsome thing to watch than two dudes clobbering each other. And the mental violence is positively gory. Women entwine.” Gillian Flynn As Terry Eagleton notes in his essay On Evil: “Evil, like religious fundamentalism, is among other things a nostalgia for an older, simpler civilisation, in which there were certitudes like damnation and salvation, and you knew where you stood… In a curious sense, evi