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Marvin Macy: The Strong Man of Grotesque Power and Heteronormativity Thumbnail

Marvin Macy: The Strong Man of Grotesque Power and Heteronormativity

Posted by Rachel Carden on May 19, 2017 in Blog, Rachel Carden tagged with , , , , ,

In my previous blog, I established Miss Amelia’s café as a place of inclusive community, linked to Mikhail Bakhtin’s conceptualisation of carnivals and their connection to freak shows. I highlighted that the space engendered a sense of community where its occupants’ grotesque physicality and their subversive genders were accepted. This post explores the grotesque power of patriarchy using Foucauldian theory and its resistance to the collapse of dichotomous gender and sexuality binaries in Carson McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951). Justin Edwards and Rune Graulund, i

A Strong Man, a Hermaphrodite and a Hunchbacked Dwarf Walk into a Café: Carnival and Community in McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951) Thumbnail

A Strong Man, a Hermaphrodite and a Hunchbacked Dwarf Walk into a Café: Carnival and Community in McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951)

Posted by Rachel Carden on May 12, 2017 in Blog, Rachel Carden tagged with , , , ,

In my previous blog, I summarised the plot of McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café and aligned it with key genres and tropes to highlight its Gothicism and cultural critique of patriarchy through grotesque tropes. This post uses Bakhtinian theory to situate Miss Amelia’s café as a place of community, a theatrical space of gender performance and bodily oddities, which temporarily succeeds in challenging patriarchy.   The philosopher and literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin’s Rabelais and His world (1965) analyses the work of the Renaissance writer François Rabelais to refocu

Carson McCullers and Genre: Female Gothic, American Gothic and the Southern Gothic’s Grotesquerie Thumbnail

Carson McCullers and Genre: Female Gothic, American Gothic and the Southern Gothic’s Grotesquerie

Posted by Rachel Carden on May 05, 2017 in Blog, Rachel Carden tagged with , , , , , ,

Carson McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951) portrays the destructive power of the patriarchal regime.[1] McCullers’ use of grotesquerie brings the marginalised, the androgynous, the deformed and the weird to the forefront of her novella. In doing so, she makes the abnormal normal and the importance of binary distinctions, such as masculine and feminine, gay and straight, breakdown, at least temporarily. We feel compassion for those traditionally omitted from society and power – particularly, the distinctly masculine Miss Amelia – and we mourn the loss of a fleetingly enjoy

Review: Post-Millennial Gothic: Comedy, Romance and the Rise of Happy Gothic Thumbnail

Review: Post-Millennial Gothic: Comedy, Romance and the Rise of Happy Gothic

Posted by Donna Mitchell on April 22, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Post-Millennial Gothic: Comedy, Romance and the Rise of Happy Gothic Catherine Spooner New York: Continuum Publishing Corporation, 2017. ISBN: 978-1-4411-5390-6 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Spooner’s study begins by bringing the reader’s attention to the fact that funny, romantic, and celebratory aspects of the Gothic text have long been ignored. Focusing on the summer of 2012 as a starting point for the rise of post-millennial Gothic’s popularity in terms of its increasing social and cultural omnipresence, she coins the phrase ‘happy Gothic’ as an umbrella term to describe the

CFP: Rereading Stephen King: Navigating the Intertextual Labyrinth Thumbnail

CFP: Rereading Stephen King: Navigating the Intertextual Labyrinth

Posted by Matt Foley on March 07, 2017 in Blog, News tagged with , , , , ,

Rereading Stephen King: Navigating the Intertextual Labyrinth Kingston University Saturday 11th November 2017 Keynote Speaker: Simon Brown (Kingston University) In Stephen King’s Gothic (2011) John Sears asserts that rereading King represents ‘an exercise in the extension of repetition, in the act of rereading an oeuvre already deeply structured … by its own engagement in the Gothic habit of rereading … To reread King would be to enter … and perhaps to become lost within, a labyrinth of intra- and intertextual relations, an immense and complex textual space’ (2). Sears’s

CFP: Global Fantastika Thumbnail

CFP: Global Fantastika

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 21, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell tagged with ,

Fantastika Journal Call for Papers for Global Fantastika Edition “Fantastika”, coined by John Clute, is an umbrella term which incorporates the genres of fantasy, science fiction, and horror, but can also include alternative histories, steampunk, young adult fiction, or any other imaginative space. The third annual Fantastika conference focused on productions of Fantastika globally, as well as considering themes of contact across nations and borders within Fantastika. We are now seeking to supplement extended conference papers with other work in order to publish a special edition of F

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 05, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction Gina Wisker Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-137-30348-6 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell In the introduction to her latest monograph, Gina Wisker defines contemporary women’s Gothic writing as the ‘subversive granddaughter of eighteenth-century Gothic fiction’ (Wisker 27) due to its ability to mix horror and fantasy, liberate forbidden desires, and expose repressed or hidden secrets from the past. Her study brings attention to the many essential links between feminist perspectives / critiques and contemporary women’s Gothic writi

Review: Horror: A Literary History Thumbnail

Review: Horror: A Literary History

Posted by Carly Stevenson on January 21, 2017 in Blog, Carly Stevenson, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

According to Reyes, the ‘transmedial, transhistorical and marketable genre’ (p.8) of horror is ‘largely defined by its affective pretences’ (p.7). That is to say, horror is inextricably bound up with the sense of disgust, fear and shock experienced by the reader. This is where horror diverges from its bedfellow terror. As the first two chapters of this book elucidate, the terms horror and terror were used interchangeably in seminal Gothic documents such as Edmund Burke’s A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, Anna Laetitia Aikin’s ‘On

Official Launch of The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS) Thumbnail

Official Launch of The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on December 15, 2016 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, News tagged with

The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS): Official Launch Event, viagra 60mg Trinity College Dublin, rx January 21st 2017. The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS) is a new collective of Irish-based scholars working on all aspects of the gothic and the horror genres. Members can focus on topics from any time period, whether produced in Ireland or elsewhere, including literature, film, television, new media, the visual arts, the fine arts, archival research, music, and history. The network will be formally launched in the Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin, on Saturday, January 21s

_Frankenstein_ (1931) at the Bo’ness Hippodrome, Saturday October 15th Thumbnail

_Frankenstein_ (1931) at the Bo’ness Hippodrome, Saturday October 15th

Posted by Matt Foley on October 19, 2016 in Blog tagged with , , , , ,

It was a great pleasure to introduce James Whale's Frankenstein at the Bo'ness Hippodrome on Saturday 15th October as part of their Universal Monsters series, which is running in the weeks up to Halloween, and which is curated by Falkirk Community Trust's Arts Development Officer Alison Strauss. The Hippodrome is a wonderful cinema. It was restored only seven years ago to all its 1910's glory. Full of character, it's an intimate venue in which to watch both golden oldies and current blockbusters -- a building and a meeting place that the people of Bo'ness can be very proud of. A parti