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CFP: Rereading Stephen King: Navigating the Intertextual Labyrinth Thumbnail

CFP: Rereading Stephen King: Navigating the Intertextual Labyrinth

Posted by Matt Foley on March 07, 2017 in Blog, News tagged with , , , , ,

Rereading Stephen King: Navigating the Intertextual Labyrinth Kingston University Saturday 11th November 2017 Keynote Speaker: Simon Brown (Kingston University) In Stephen King’s Gothic (2011) John Sears asserts that rereading King represents ‘an exercise in the extension of repetition, in the act of rereading an oeuvre already deeply structured … by its own engagement in the Gothic habit of rereading … To reread King would be to enter … and perhaps to become lost within, a labyrinth of intra- and intertextual relations, an immense and complex textual space’ (2). Sears’s

CFP: Global Fantastika Thumbnail

CFP: Global Fantastika

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 21, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell tagged with ,

Fantastika Journal Call for Papers for Global Fantastika Edition “Fantastika”, coined by John Clute, is an umbrella term which incorporates the genres of fantasy, science fiction, and horror, but can also include alternative histories, steampunk, young adult fiction, or any other imaginative space. The third annual Fantastika conference focused on productions of Fantastika globally, as well as considering themes of contact across nations and borders within Fantastika. We are now seeking to supplement extended conference papers with other work in order to publish a special edition of F

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 05, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction Gina Wisker Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-137-30348-6 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell In the introduction to her latest monograph, Gina Wisker defines contemporary women’s Gothic writing as the ‘subversive granddaughter of eighteenth-century Gothic fiction’ (Wisker 27) due to its ability to mix horror and fantasy, liberate forbidden desires, and expose repressed or hidden secrets from the past. Her study brings attention to the many essential links between feminist perspectives / critiques and contemporary women’s Gothic writi

Review: Horror: A Literary History Thumbnail

Review: Horror: A Literary History

Posted by Carly Stevenson on January 21, 2017 in Blog, Carly Stevenson, Reviews tagged with , , , ,

According to Reyes, the ‘transmedial, transhistorical and marketable genre’ (p.8) of horror is ‘largely defined by its affective pretences’ (p.7). That is to say, horror is inextricably bound up with the sense of disgust, fear and shock experienced by the reader. This is where horror diverges from its bedfellow terror. As the first two chapters of this book elucidate, the terms horror and terror were used interchangeably in seminal Gothic documents such as Edmund Burke’s A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, Anna Laetitia Aikin’s ‘On

Official Launch of The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS) Thumbnail

Official Launch of The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on December 15, 2016 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, News tagged with

The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS): Official Launch Event, viagra 60mg Trinity College Dublin, rx January 21st 2017. The Irish Network for Gothic Studies (INGS) is a new collective of Irish-based scholars working on all aspects of the gothic and the horror genres. Members can focus on topics from any time period, whether produced in Ireland or elsewhere, including literature, film, television, new media, the visual arts, the fine arts, archival research, music, and history. The network will be formally launched in the Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin, on Saturday, January 21s

_Frankenstein_ (1931) at the Bo’ness Hippodrome, Saturday October 15th Thumbnail

_Frankenstein_ (1931) at the Bo’ness Hippodrome, Saturday October 15th

Posted by Matt Foley on October 19, 2016 in Blog tagged with , , , , ,

It was a great pleasure to introduce James Whale's Frankenstein at the Bo'ness Hippodrome on Saturday 15th October as part of their Universal Monsters series, which is running in the weeks up to Halloween, and which is curated by Falkirk Community Trust's Arts Development Officer Alison Strauss. The Hippodrome is a wonderful cinema. It was restored only seven years ago to all its 1910's glory. Full of character, it's an intimate venue in which to watch both golden oldies and current blockbusters -- a building and a meeting place that the people of Bo'ness can be very proud of. A parti

Review: Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion Thumbnail

Review: Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion

Posted by Donna Mitchell on August 09, 2016 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion Edited by Avril Horner and Sue Zlosnik Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, pilule 2016. ISBN: 978-0-7486-9912-4 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell A welcome addition to the field of Gothic criticism, decease Horner and Zlosnik’s Women and the Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion mixes established classics of the canon with recent films, patient novels and video games, and examines them through the lens of feminist and/or post-feminist theory. The main purpose of this study is not only to explore how the representation of women and identity in the Gothic h

Gothic Art (from the Gothic MOOC) Thumbnail

Gothic Art (from the Gothic MOOC)

Posted by Peter Lindfield on August 08, 2016 in Peter Lindfield tagged with , , , , , , , ,

These four videos mark the conclusion of the AHRC-funded MOOC at Stirling on eighteenth-century Gothic across the arts. The videos examine the multifaceted expressions of the Gothic aesthetic in the visual arts. You will also find a concluding message from Dale Townshend and myself at the bottom of this page. If you have any questions regarding the videos, the content, material, or ideas presented in these or any of our MOOC's sections available on the Gothic Imagination website, please do not hesitate to get in contact with us. From September 2016 Dale Townshend will be contactable at

Gothic Interiors (from the Gothic MOOC) Thumbnail

Gothic Interiors (from the Gothic MOOC)

Posted by Peter Lindfield on August 01, 2016 in Peter Lindfield, Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

This set of three videos considers the development, appearance and furnishing of the Georgian Gothic interior as exemplified especially in British country houses.   If you are interested in eighteenth-century Gothic architecture, interiors and furniture, you may be interested in my forthcoming monograph, Georgian Gothic: Architecture, Furniture and Interiors, 1730–1840, to be published in later October 2016 by Boydell & Brewer. The book will be launched at Strawberry Hill House, Twickenham, on 17 November 2016. You can register to attend at: https://www.eventbrite.co.u

Gothic Literary Aesthetic II (from Gothic MOOC) Thumbnail

Gothic Literary Aesthetic II (from Gothic MOOC)

Posted by Peter Lindfield on July 16, 2016 in Peter Lindfield tagged with , , , , ,

Hello, purchase and welcome to the videos from the third week of our MOOC, The Gothic Revival, 1700–1850: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. We’ve got plenty of material in store for you, in a session devoted to an exploration of the Gothic literary aesthetic beyond the example of The Castle of Otranto.  In these videos we will take you through some of the aesthetic foundations of early Gothic writing, including an account of the distinctions between horror and terror, the importance of Shakespeare to the Gothic aesthetic, and the culmination of the so-called ‘first wave’ of Gothic