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Why Study the Gothic? Thumbnail

Why Study the Gothic?

Posted by Stephanie Bryant on August 20, 2014 in Blog, Steph Bryant tagged with

On the 24th of July I graduated from Manchester Metropolitan University with a MA in English Studies, specializing in the Gothic. The first half of that title is greeted with a half “congratulations” hovering on the well wishers lips; the latter half is met with a quizzical raising of the eyebrows and the inevitable questions, “ oh, Like Dracula and wearing black?” and so being, in their eyes, defined. The irony of this defined status is that the gothic as a mode is a malleable term that eludes a definitive definition, as most students of the gothic are aware. Whilst studying the Goth

“loved with a love that was more than love”: From Poe’s “Annabel Lee” to Nabokov’s Lolita Thumbnail

“loved with a love that was more than love”: From Poe’s “Annabel Lee” to Nabokov’s Lolita

Posted by Janet Chu on August 18, 2014 in Blog, Janet Chu tagged with

     Since its initial publication in 1955, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita has been renowned (or infamous) for its controversial plot that charts a middle-aged professor Humbert Humbert’s paedophilic infatuation for a 12-year-old girl Dolores Haze, whom the former amorously nicknames Lolita. In constructing the episodes of such a distorted psyche—interestingly and unmistakably—Nabokov intertextually refers to his 19th-century American precursor Edgar Allan Poe’s “Annabel Lee” in naming Humbert’s childhood love as “Annabel Leigh.” Annabel Leigh’s premature death results

Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear, con’t Thumbnail

Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear, con’t

Posted by Will Connor on August 05, 2014 in Blog, Will Connor tagged with

(to see the first part of this three part post, go here) In this second post on Dread Falls Theatre’s upcoming immersive performance piece, Father Dagon, based on the works of H. P. Lovecraft, I want to further detail the ways in which Victoria Snaith, director of the show and owner of the company, expects to embrace Lovecraft’s sensibilities in a non-traditional performative setting. As mentioned in the previous post, one of Lovecraft’s main threads incorporated throughout many of his works is instilling a sense of fear, both in the reader and the protagonist’s psyche, specifically a

Ann Radcliffe at 250: Gothic and Romantic Imaginations Thumbnail

Ann Radcliffe at 250: Gothic and Romantic Imaginations

Posted by Carly Stevenson on August 05, 2014 in Blog, Carly Stevenson tagged with , , , ,

A review by the University of Sheffield's Gothic Reading Group: Last month marked a special occasion for the history of the Gothic, as the University of Sheffield celebrated Ann Radcliffe’s 250th birthday with the first ever international academic conference dedicated entirely to ‘the great enchantress’ and her works. Ann Radcliffe at 250: Gothic and Romantic Imaginations ran for three days, between the 27th and 29th of June. The event was the result of long-planning and hard work on the part of its chief organisers, The University of Stirling’s Dr. Dale Townshend and Sheffield’s

Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear Thumbnail

Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear

Posted by Will Connor on July 29, 2014 in Blog, Will Connor tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

          H. P. Lovecraft is arguably one of the most important writers of the previous century and remains so today. His works, spanning horror, science fiction, and fantasy, have influenced a large number of prominent authors following fellow writer and fan August Derleth’s adamant insistence that Lovecraft’s works be preserved and widely published. As a result, many tributes, expansions, and interpretations of Lovecraft’s works have been produced in increasing numbers each year to date. Literature is not the only form of media producing Lovecraftian works, either, with the most c

Dracula in the Avant-Garde, or, How Jess Franco got into MOMA Thumbnail

Dracula in the Avant-Garde, or, How Jess Franco got into MOMA

Posted by Glenn Ward on April 10, 2014 in Blog, Glenn Ward, Guest Blog tagged with , ,

In this blog I use the gothic sexploitation specialist Jess Franco as a case study in the vexed issue of cultural hierarchy. This is a large topic for a small space, but my central interest is Franco’s frequent brushes with legitimate, high-brow and arthouse cinema. Whether you regard his flirtations with reputability as sincere, tongue-in-cheek or opportunistic may depend on your cultural politics as well as on which part of which version of which film you are watching. Even then, the generally ragged quality of the films makes Franco’s position on elite culture difficult to establish and

‘Man, it was a Wild Scene’:  Venus in Furs and the spectral object of desire Thumbnail

‘Man, it was a Wild Scene’: Venus in Furs and the spectral object of desire

Posted by Glenn Ward on April 09, 2014 in Blog, Glenn Ward tagged with , , ,

I would like to use my blogs  to look at the filmmaker Jesús Franco Manera, more commonly known as Jess Franco (1930 - 2013). The prolific Franco worked in several genres, but the films I will write about here are wayward combinations of (sometimes supernatural) horror and eroticism situated somewhere between low-budget exploitation and art cinema. Most of Franco’s better known works fall into the hybrid category of sex-and-horror cinema popular in Europe during the 1960s and ‘70s, with promising titles like Kiss Me Monster (1967), She Kills in Ecstasy (1970) and Virgin among the Liv

Through the Looking-Screen Thumbnail

Through the Looking-Screen

Posted by Gabriel Eljaiek-Rodriguez on February 28, 2014 in Blog, Gabriel A. Eljaiek-Rodriguez, Guest Blog tagged with

My perception of screens (movie, television, phone, etc.) has changed considerably since the beginning of the new millennium. After watching the Japanese film Ringu (1999) by Hideo Nakata, the TV screen ceased to be merely the reflective surface of a familiar machine; it became a portal through which communication between the world of the living and the dead was possible. Although I had been an avid consumer of horror films since I was a little kid, movies such as the excellent Poltergeist (1982) by Tobe Hooper or Videodrome (1983) by David Cronenberg —films in which the screen also becomes

Review: Goth Girl and the Ghost of A Mouse Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Ghost of A Mouse

Posted by Chloe Buckley on February 14, 2014 in Blog, Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , ,

Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse by Chris Riddell Publisher: Macmillan (Sep 2013) ISBN-10: 0230759807 ISBN-13: 978-0230759800 Review by Chloe Buckley Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse is a beautiful and wonderfully silly book. I confess: it is one of the most enjoyable books that I have read for some time. However, beyond my immediate response as a newly converted Chris Riddell fan, I would argue that the pleasures offered by Goth Girl are timely and pertinent in terms of understanding why contemporary children’s gothic continues to flourish as a popular and literary form. The suc

Of Monsters and Accents Thumbnail

Of Monsters and Accents

Posted by Gabriel Eljaiek-Rodriguez on February 12, 2014 in Blog, Gabriel A. Eljaiek-Rodriguez, Guest Blog tagged with

  Before my arrival in the United States I had never paid that much attention to the accent of Count von Count, Sesame Street’s cuddly number-obsessed vampire. It was only after I heard the English-speaking version, with his thick Bela Lugosi-inspired accent, that I realized that the dubbed Count that I watched as a kid also had a vaguely Eastern European accent. Despite this blatant oversight I never doubted that the sympathetic vampire came from some remote Transylvanian corner. This is one of any reader’s first certainties regarding vampire stories: they—along with many ot