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The Shock and Horror Picture Show: Étienne-Gaspard Robertson and the 19th-century phantasmagoria Thumbnail

The Shock and Horror Picture Show: Étienne-Gaspard Robertson and the 19th-century phantasmagoria

Posted by Lynn Shepherd on October 31, 2014 in Blog, Lynn Shepherd tagged with , , , ,

The first time I had a sense of what a 19th-century phantasmagoria would really have been like was the Gothic Nightmares show at Tate Britain in 2006, which included not only Fuseli’s iconic Nightmare, but a special darkened room with a slide show projected on the walls, and suitably ghastly sound effects. That experience stayed with me, and when I came to write The Pierced Heart, it was the inspiration for the second of the two narratives in the book, in which the narrator is a young girl called Lucy, the daughter and assistant to the proprietor of a famous phantasmagoria show. My ‘Pro

Fictions of Corporeal Diversity: A Symposium on Literary Disability Studies Thumbnail

Fictions of Corporeal Diversity: A Symposium on Literary Disability Studies

Posted by Matt Foley on October 30, 2014 in Blog, News tagged with ,

Fictions of Corporeal Diversity: A Symposium on Literary Disability Studies Lancaster University a.gregory5@lancaster.ac.uk Charles Carter Building, Lancaster University Thursday 4th June 2015 Keynote Speaker: David Bolt (Liverpool Hope University)   In ‘Literary Disability Studies: The Long Awaited Response’ (2007), David Bolt illustrated the absence of critical work on disability in literary studies. The subsequent establishment of The Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, in addition to the continuing expansion of the University of Mich

Youth and Young Manhood, Male Anxiety in Palo Alto Thumbnail

Youth and Young Manhood, Male Anxiety in Palo Alto

Posted by Liam Dodds on October 23, 2014 in Blog tagged with , , , , , , ,

"There’s a part of me that’s like that, and it’s a part that I keep so hidden," he said. "So basically that role was almost liberating. It was finding this part of myself that needs a ton of attention that I usually keep hidden and bringing it out to the front" - Nat Wolff What does it mean to be a modern man? In the face of decades of increasing marginalisation, the concurrent rise of political correctness, and an overt and overly-prescriptive consumerist agenda – where men were told what to wear, how to act, but most importantly, what to suppress – Fight Club sought to respond 

Waking the (un)dead: Myths, monsters, and remaking a classic text Thumbnail

Waking the (un)dead: Myths, monsters, and remaking a classic text

Posted by Lynn Shepherd on October 21, 2014 in Blog, Lynn Shepherd tagged with , , , , , , ,

When I published Murder at Mansfield Park in 2010 I did an interview about it on BBC radio, and I remember the almost breathless awe in the interviewer’s voice as she said, “This is your first novel, and you’re trying to write like Jane Austen?” Amazing though it may sound, that was the first time that it really came home to me what a mountainous task I’d set myself. Though I’d been under no illusions about how some readers might react to the idea of turning an Austen masterpiece into a murder mystery – there will always be some people who regard classic texts as sacred cows, nev

The Death of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl Thumbnail

The Death of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl

Posted by Liam Dodds on October 13, 2014 in Blog tagged with , , , , ,

The books don’t matter. Accordingly, I had not read Gillian Flynn's Gone Girl before I took my seat in the feted darkness of Edinburgh’s improbable and implausible Omni Centre. I had, however, briefly perused the novel’s Wikipedia article just so that, in the darkness, I could smirk my semi-knowing smirk in a pathetic show of one-upmanship over the twenty other people in the world who hadn’t read the novel as that twist was portrayed in beautiful, splendid Technicolor. I say twist. The old-timey Village actually set in the present day, the strange otherworldliness of a post-apocal

Review: The Cambridge Companion to Sensation Fiction Thumbnail

Review: The Cambridge Companion to Sensation Fiction

Posted by Fern Pullan on October 09, 2014 in Blog, Fern Pullan, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

Mangham, Andrew (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Sensation Fiction. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. 2013 first edition paperback. 978-0-521-15709-4, 253pp. £18.99 www.cambridge.org Mangham’s Companion of fifteen essays is a highly refreshing study of the sensation fiction genre, highlighted by his introduction to the volume and his unwillingness to commit to a concrete time frame for the genre. He demonstrates the difficulties in defining sensation fiction at the same time as acknowledging the text that is generally accepted as being the progenitor of the genre: What

Vampires and Victorians: Science and superstition in 19th-century London Thumbnail

Vampires and Victorians: Science and superstition in 19th-century London

Posted by Lynn Shepherd on October 07, 2014 in Blog, Lynn Shepherd tagged with , , , , , , ,

When it comes to timing, I’ve had two fantastic strokes of luck as a novelist. The first was that I decided to bring my Dickens-related book, Tom-All-Alone’s, to a close at the end of November 1850. Why was that lucky? Because it meant that when I chose to follow that novel with a sequel about the Shelleys I had eight or nine precious weeks before Mary Shelley’s death on February 1st 1851, so one of my main protagonists was still alive to play a role in the story. And from that followed the second stroke of luck, because 1851 was, of course, the year of the Great Exhibition. And what bet

M.R. James and the Modern Ghost Story: a one-day symposium Thumbnail

M.R. James and the Modern Ghost Story: a one-day symposium

Posted by Matt Foley on October 01, 2014 in Blog tagged with ,

M.R. James and the Modern Ghost Story: a one-day symposium hosted by the University of Leeds, to be held at The Leeds Library on 28 March 2015 Confirmed Keynotes: Roger Luckhurst (Birkbeck College, University of London) Darryl Jones (Trinity College, Dublin) Helen Grant (Author) The conference will be followed by a public screening of ‘A Warning to the Curious’ (1972) and a Q & A session with writer/director, Lawrence Gordon Clark The ghost stories of Montague Rhodes James (1862-1936) are amongst the most influential in the English language. Never out of print, they

Beware of the Mexican Dracula! Thumbnail

Beware of the Mexican Dracula!

Posted by Gabriel Eljaiek-Rodriguez on September 18, 2014 in Blog, Gabriel A. Eljaiek-Rodriguez tagged with

“They have fangs, and they die when you stab them in the heart, so I’m going to go out on a limb here and say Mexican Dracula”. This is the accurate guess that Seth Gecko, one of the main characters of From Dusk Till Down: The Series, shares with his group of fellow survivors of the attack on the nightclub Titty Twister. This 2014 version – developed for television by Robert Rodriguez himself and based on his 1996 film – reunites viewers with the Gecko brothers, the Fuller family, and the vampires they encounter on the Mexican border, delving deeper into their stories and providing s

Why Study the Gothic? Thumbnail

Why Study the Gothic?

Posted by Stephanie Bryant on August 20, 2014 in Blog, Steph Bryant tagged with

On the 24th of July I graduated from Manchester Metropolitan University with a MA in English Studies, specializing in the Gothic. The first half of that title is greeted with a half “congratulations” hovering on the well wishers lips; the latter half is met with a quizzical raising of the eyebrows and the inevitable questions, “ oh, Like Dracula and wearing black?” and so being, in their eyes, defined. The irony of this defined status is that the gothic as a mode is a malleable term that eludes a definitive definition, as most students of the gothic are aware. Whilst studying the Goth