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Conference Registration Reminder:  Gothic Feminism, University of Kent Thumbnail

Conference Registration Reminder: Gothic Feminism, University of Kent

Posted by Matt Foley on April 29, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , , , ,

Registration Reminder: Gothic Feminism: The Representation of the Gothic Heroine in Cinema University of Kent   (Registration deadline: 18th May 2016)   Keynote Speaker: Dr Catherine Spooner (Lancaster University) Registration is still open for Gothic Feminism: a conference on cinema's Gothic heroines taking place at the University of Kent (please see conference programme below).   To register, please go to: http://store.kent.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=1&deptid=26&catid=158&prodvarid=207&searchresults=1   The confer

CFP: GANZA’s third biennial conference, January, Auckland Thumbnail

CFP: GANZA’s third biennial conference, January, Auckland

Posted by Matt Foley on April 27, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , , , , ,

Call for Papers Gothic Afterlives: Mutations, Histories, and Returns The Gothic Association of New Zealand and Australia (GANZA) welcomes papers for its third biennial conference, to be held at Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand, on 23-24 January 2017. The conference will be organised in the spirit of the Association. GANZA is interdisciplinary in nature, bringing together scholars, students, teachers and professionals from a number of Gothic disciplines, including literature, film, music, television, fashion, architecture, and other popular culture forms. It is the aim of the

‘The Haunted House in French Culture’, London 19 May Thumbnail

‘The Haunted House in French Culture’, London 19 May

Posted by Matt Foley on April 22, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , ,

The Haunted House in French Culture 19 May 2016 Room 243, Senate House, University of London Malet Street, London WC1 7HU   The haunted house is a significant Gothic motif in literature, film and television. It can be understood as the domestication of the Gothic, as the older concept of the aristocratic ancestral home becomes more diluted, more nuanced, by the rise of the bourgeois family. The haunted house comes to represent a variety of thematic concepts: it can be read as revealing the fault lines of gender, sexuality and class, as symbolic of hidden trauma, or it can be

“a bit like Serial”: journo-podding and the new sounds of horror Thumbnail

“a bit like Serial”: journo-podding and the new sounds of horror

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 20, 2016 in Blog, Danielle Hancock, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  Up until the advent of Serial, I had a hard time explaining my research area to people. “Podcasts”, I’d say. “Pod-what?”, they’d reply. “Podcasts, scary ones. Like Welcome to Nightvale”. “Oh. Yeah, I’ve never heard of that.” There would be an exchange of mutually apologetic smiles, I’d mutter something about it being a bit like radio, and wish I’d stuck with literature studies. Then Serial happened. An off-shoot of NPR’s vastly popular radio programme cum podcast, This American Life,  Serial followed journalist Sarah Koenig’s ongoing, true-life, investi

Monstrosity, False Twins, and the Bush Thumbnail

Monstrosity, False Twins, and the Bush

Posted by Madelyn Schoonover on April 15, 2016 in Blog, Madelyn Schoonover tagged with , , , ,

In part two, I discussed Jessamy's fractured identity in The Icarus Girl, and how the patriarchal modes of colonizing England and Nigeria both hinder Jessamy's ability to assert a stable identity. I then introduced the ambiguous spirit TillyTilly as a productive presence in Jessamy's life that helps her begin to find self-confidence. Though Jessamy initially finds comfort in TillyTilly’s ability to transgress identity, as the novel progresses, TillyTilly becomes a much more fixed and dangerous thing. In keeping with the traditional Gothic trope of doubling, TillyTilly becomes a mons

Dangerous Doubling and Fractured Identity in “The Icarus Girl” Thumbnail

Dangerous Doubling and Fractured Identity in “The Icarus Girl”

Posted by Madelyn Schoonover on April 09, 2016 in Blog, Madelyn Schoonover tagged with , , , ,

In part one of this three part series, I explained how the colonial program implemented the concept of the European Family of Man to control colonized societies, and to completely erase the colonized female from discourse. I proposed that postcolonial Gothic is a medium for colonized females to regain this lost voice. In this section, I will explore some of the traditionally Gothic tropes that Helen Oyeyemi utilizes to interrogate a postcolonial past and move toward a more empowered future for her protagonist Jessamy in The Icarus Girl. Like many traditional Gothic heroines such as J

Fear Horror and Terror! CfP alert Thumbnail

Fear Horror and Terror! CfP alert

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on April 06, 2016 in Evan Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , ,

This is a call for presentations, and an introduction to the project as it stands. The deadline for the CfP is 15th April 2016, so please do share it widely and quickly! This event will be 10th Annual International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Fear Horror and Terror, organised by Inter-disiplinary.net. It is my second as project lead. First, the details - what is this CfP about?? Dates: Friday 9th September – Sunday 11th September 2016 Location: Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom   Fear, Horror and Terror can be seen as the defining experiences and political tools

Lazarus Experiment: Doomed to Fail? Thumbnail

Lazarus Experiment: Doomed to Fail?

Posted by Holly Hirst on April 04, 2016 in Blog, Holly Hirst tagged with , , , , , , , ,

In the previous blog post, I looked at Dickens’ reworking of the parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus in his A Christmas Carol. This tale, while not explicitly referencing the parable, has obvious parallels with it and largely echoes its moral.  It rejects the ability of the revived dead, or the simple supernatural, to offer redemption and dispense with doubt. It continues, however, to offer the hope of redemption and renewal through direct revelation to those willing to accept this revelation.  The hope is inherent in the parable – if the Rich man’s relatives could believe in that

Female Gothic, Post-Colonialism, and The Icarus Girl Thumbnail

Female Gothic, Post-Colonialism, and The Icarus Girl

Posted by Madelyn Schoonover on April 01, 2016 in Madelyn Schoonover tagged with , , , , ,

Since the Whig politician Horace Walpole first penned The Castle of Otranto in 1764, Gothic authors have been objecting to rigid social and political conventions and structures, questioning authority in its sundry forms from tyrannical patriarch to power-hungry Prioress. In stories of terror and intrigue such as Matthew Lewis’ The Monk (1796), readers enter an uncanny literary universe of the hyperreal; places where ghosts of past traumas are literal and rationality will not always save the heroes. As Andrew Smith and William Hughes note, the Gothic is a “celebration of the irrational,

Oh, to furnish a house with the true scraps of the Barons’ Wars Thumbnail

Oh, to furnish a house with the true scraps of the Barons’ Wars

Posted by Peter Lindfield on March 31, 2016 in Blog, Peter Lindfield, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , ,

The collection of relics from past civilisations and places was not a new phenomenon in the 1750s when an interest in amassing and displaying medieval furniture developed. Horace Walpole (1717–97), author, collector and son of the first Prime Minster, Sir Robert Walpole, started collecting Greek and Roman antiquities whilst on the Grand Tour of the Continent in 1739. However, collecting relics from Britain and Europe’s medieval past became integral to the furnishing of Gothic interiors after the mid-eighteenth century. The character of medieval furniture and notions of authenticity were q