Archive of Timothy Jones

has written 40 articles on The Gothic Imagination.

Verónica: Something horrible for the weekend Thumbnail

Verónica: Something horrible for the weekend

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 05, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

  Just a note to say that Stirling Gothicist Professor Ann Davies will be introducing Verónica, the latest film by Paco Plaza ([REC]), to be screened in both Edinburgh and Glasgow as part of the Edinburgh Spanish Film Festival this weekend. Edinburgh: Filmhouse, Lothian Road, Edinburgh, Sunday 7 October 20:20 Glasgow: Glasgow Film Theatre, Rose St, Glasgow, Monday 15 October 20:15   For further details: https://www.edinburghspanishfilmfestival.com/en/films/veronica/ https://www.ed.ac.uk/files/atoms/files/esff_programme_2018.pdf  

What Lies Beneath: Neoliberalism, Façades and Truth in Aleš Šteger’s Absolution Thumbnail

What Lies Beneath: Neoliberalism, Façades and Truth in Aleš Šteger’s Absolution

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 03, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

  By Kate Walker   In the introduction to New Directions in 21st Century Gothic, Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Donna Lee Brien discuss the malleability of the term 'Gothic,' and its continual transformation into disparate narrative forms and fictional disciplines.  Whilst recognising how 'contemporary Gothic is never too far removed from its origins and its narrative pasts,'[1]  they simultaneously explore how the gothic has also become increasingly popularised and commercialised within contemporary contexts.  These perspectives led to the development of transnational gothic a

The “Post Racial Lie” and Horror Movie Expectations in Get Out Thumbnail

The “Post Racial Lie” and Horror Movie Expectations in Get Out

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 03, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

By Sarah Treanor   Get Out (2017) has been hailed by the media as “the satirical horror movie we’ve been waiting for” (Edelstein). The fact that we’ve been waiting for it implies not only that it is something we have not seen before, but also that it has something culturally and socially necessary to say. Peele has said that he “wrote the movie primarily during the post racial lie” and, rather than perpetuate this lie, Get Out gives us the idea that “the underside of culture is blood, torture, death and horror” (Jameson, 57). This blog will discuss how the cultur

Welcome to Rapture: The influence of Metropolis on BioShock’s dystopian Gothic City Thumbnail

Welcome to Rapture: The influence of Metropolis on BioShock’s dystopian Gothic City

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 03, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with

  By Michael Andrews   It is 2007. I’m twelve years old—only six years shy of BioShock’s PEGI 18 rating. At midnight I plug in a borrowed XBOX 360 and insert the disc. How scary can a game be, they’re meant to be fun after all? Approximately six minutes and fifty-five seconds into my first journey through Rapture, a terrifying, unseen voice says from the rafters ‘I’ll wrap you in a sheet’. I turn off the console and do not return to BioShock for another few years. 2K Games and director Ken Levine’s 2007 magnum opus BioShock[1][2] is still, in 2018, thr

The Handmaid’s Tale as Dystopian Gothic Thumbnail

The Handmaid’s Tale as Dystopian Gothic

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 03, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

By Egon Cools   As an effort towards new criticism of Gothic works, this blog series addresses Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale – a novel published in 1986, but holding more relevance and significance today than ever before. This first part contextualises The Handmaid’s Tale through an introduction to dystopian fiction and the genre’s links to the Gothic, and also relates the novel to female oppression as presented in ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’. The second entry in this series will address the resurgence in popularity of The Handmaid’s Tale in recent years, and

CfP: 40th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts (ICFA) Thumbnail

CfP: 40th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts (ICFA)

Posted by Timothy Jones on August 28, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

March 13-17, 2019 at the Marriott Orlando Airport Hotel. The deadline for submitting proposals is October 31, 2018. Please join us for ICFA 40, March 13-17, 2019, when our theme will be “Politics and Conflict.” We welcome papers on the work of: Guest Scholar Mark Bould (Reader, University of the West of England; winner of the SFRA Pilgrim Award; author of several books on sf including Science Fiction: The Routledge Film Guidebook) and Guest Author G. Willow Wilson (winner of a PEN Center award; writer of the Hugo-Award-winning series Ms. Marvel, author of Alif the Unseen). Specul

Lacan and Dracula Thumbnail

Lacan and Dracula

Posted by Timothy Jones on August 23, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

By Josephine Sharoni   Already in 1958 the literary critic,  Maurice Richardson commented that the set up in Bram Stoker’s Dracula reminded him of the primal horde,’pictured somewhat fantastically’  by Freud in Totem and Taboo, ‘with the brothers banding together against the father who has tried to keep all the females to himself’.  It then turns out that several other literary works from this same period also look rather like Totem and Taboo. The Lost World (1912) by Arthur Conan Doyle, H. G. Wells’ The Invisible Man (1897) and She by Henry Rider Haggard (1887) to ta

The Sepulchre by the Sea: Repressing the Violent History of New Zealand in Sydney Bridge Upside Down Thumbnail

The Sepulchre by the Sea: Repressing the Violent History of New Zealand in Sydney Bridge Upside Down

Posted by Timothy Jones on June 13, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with

By Edith Paton Ian Conrich portrays the New Zealand landscape as one of concealment: a green, clean paradise with a dark and treacherous underbelly. He goes on to say that national literature and popular opinion point to this dichotomous topography.[1]  If then what lies beneath is hidden, the land itself can be viewed as representative of a crypt in which the despair, isolation and loss which encapsulates the nation’s literature[2] is concealed.  In her introduction to Jean Devanny’s banned novel The Butcher Shop (1926) Heather Roberts asserts that violence in the New Zealand novel i

Sex in the Slaughterhouse: Sexual Repression and Meat in Sydney Bridge Upside Down Thumbnail

Sex in the Slaughterhouse: Sexual Repression and Meat in Sydney Bridge Upside Down

Posted by Timothy Jones on May 09, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

By Edith Paton In Whole Men: The Masculine Tradition in New Zealand Literature, Kai Jensen asserts that ‘The male body seems a straightforward physical entity, yet literature may filter perceptions even here. Size, strength and […] sexual vigour tend to be attributes of the ideal New Zealand man’ and ‘[b]oys are said to feel social pressure to enlarge and strengthen their bodies.’ [1]  This understanding of New Zealand masculinity and how it is conflated with the physical body is crucial to Ballantyne’s novel.  A novel not only concerned with sexual maturation and masculinity,