Archive of Stuart Lindsay

has written 16 articles on The Gothic Imagination.

Stuart Lindsay is a teaching assistant at the University of Stirling, UK. His Ph.D. thesis, completed in 2014, concerns psychological trauma in Chernobyl survivors, and the intersection of horror fiction with this trauma. His research focus also includes Memory Studies, nostalgia, and Gothic in comics, gaming, and Internet sub-culture. He has a chapter in the forthcoming edited collection Gothic Art, entitled ‘From The Future Shocks of Judge Dredd to the Aftershocks of DC Vertigo’, and an article to be published in the next issue of the Fantastika Journal, entitled Suburban Gothic and Neoliberal Gothic in Stranger Things.

Gaming Creepypasta: ‘BEN, Drowned’ – the Haunting of Videogaming and Other Digital Spaces Thumbnail

Gaming Creepypasta: ‘BEN, Drowned’ – the Haunting of Videogaming and Other Digital Spaces

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on October 29, 2012 in Uncategorized tagged with , , , ,

The very nature of digital textuality always affords its re-writing and retroactive editing. Not only do its texts account for haunted spaces and happenings, it is itself the medium through which haunting occurs. Digital textuality – or code – is haunted metaphorically in that it encrypts the presence of other texts to conjure up their resources and display graphics or animation, and perhaps literally – as the ‘BEN, Drowned’ documents claim. Before explaining who or what BEN is, it’s necessary to outline the technical terms which describe Creepypasta and its supposedly paranormal subject.

Pop-Goth and Post Goth: Two Readings of Two Post-Gothic Fashions Thumbnail

Pop-Goth and Post Goth: Two Readings of Two Post-Gothic Fashions

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on November 22, 2011 in Blog tagged with , , ,

It is doubtless that today’s Gothic fashion sells and sells in a particularly Gothic fashion. The Pop-Gothic culture reflected in the clothes – where the cute is made morbid and the morbid made cute, exemplified by many a headless Hello Kitty – serves to parody late twentieth-century sub-cultural manifestations of Gothic’s manufactured morbidity, its over-reliance upon interpretations of the Gothic as a source of gloom and as a style or social practice suitable for teenage transformation.

“Always Bet On Duke To Represent Gaming”: Duke Nukem Forever and Representation in Videogaming Thumbnail

“Always Bet On Duke To Represent Gaming”: Duke Nukem Forever and Representation in Videogaming

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on July 04, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , ,

‘Always Bet On Duke’ has been the catchphrase of one of gaming’s most iconic and controversial heroes: Duke Nukem. Duke’s reputation of ‘kicking alien asses’, making tongue in cheek jokes, and encountering ‘babes’ has split opinion in both gaming and the wider world of media: childish, tasteless and downright offensive or clever comment on the relationship between gaming and political correctness? Either way, Duke’s humour has been enduring and endured for over eleven years; the time between the releases of Duke Nukem 3D in 1996 and near-eternally delayed Duke Nukem Forever in 2011.

Popular Ghosts: The Haunted Spaces of Everyday Culture Thumbnail

Popular Ghosts: The Haunted Spaces of Everyday Culture

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on February 10, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

‘It seems that ghosts are everywhere these days’, Pilar Blanco and Peeren assert in the introduction to this collection of essays on ghosts, ghostings, haunts and hauntings of the everyday.

Michael Barrymore’s Ghosts: I Am What I Am in ‘The House That Made Me’ (Channel 4, Thursdays, 9pm) Thumbnail

Michael Barrymore’s Ghosts: I Am What I Am in ‘The House That Made Me’ (Channel 4, Thursdays, 9pm)

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on December 20, 2010 in Blog tagged with , ,

A Gothic consciousness has invaded television. As a universal visual and critical language, Gothic’s love of re-creating and re-staging the past for emotional purposes, doubling real history with its own artificial...

Urban Exploration and the Gothesization of Reality Thumbnail

Urban Exploration and the Gothesization of Reality

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on November 11, 2010 in Blog tagged with , , , , , ,

As it explores the archives of history for its own economic and emotional ends, the site of Gothic is almost always one retrofitted with or superimposed beneath an aesthetic sheen...

Gothic Architecture and the Digital Reformation of Ecclesiastical Space Thumbnail

Gothic Architecture and the Digital Reformation of Ecclesiastical Space

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on October 04, 2010 in Blog tagged with , , , , ,

Post-1688 revolutionary historicism has always been a considerable contribution to Gothic studies, and how its fiction is continually reforming and updating the Medieval Gothic spaces of ecclesiastic life. The original architecture of the Gothic period, itself once revolutionary in creating the uncanny space of stained-glass and natural light through buttresses and ...

“It’s Out There, Somewhere…” Thumbnail

“It’s Out There, Somewhere…”

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on June 24, 2010 in Blog tagged with

Racial camouflage, transparency and selection in Predator and Predator 2 As an industry that has become a global influence on issues of race and culture, Hollywood’s stratifying of power relations between American national, immigrant and other through film is significant. The Predator series of action/horror films offer a unique insight into American film’s fixation, fixing and ultimately, its destruction of hybrid national identity. In each Predator film, the titular creature’s hunted prey, usually a group of ethnically diverse targets, is one of emulation: a chameleon act through c

Post-War Disjunctions in Domesticity Thumbnail

Post-War Disjunctions in Domesticity

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on April 19, 2010 in Blog tagged with

Post-War Disjunctions in Domesticity: America, and the Family and Gothic in the Bioshock and Fallout Videogame Series The distinctly American notion of Homely Gothic has been the subject of constant revision, adapting to the shift in where and how people live, and the way in which they defend this bastion of safety and symbolism. From Nathaniel Hawthorn to Cormack McCarthy, the American family has always been the subject of assault, invasion and violation, from both without and within. The modern American family, a symbol of the nation’s purity and assured future, has its origins in the