Archive of Hannah Priest

has written 4 articles on The Gothic Imagination.

Hannah Priest is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Manchester. She completed her PhD in 2009, working on monsters and identity construction in late medieval romance. She now works on medieval and contemporary popular literature and culture, and has published articles and chapters on werewolves, fairies and vampires in medieval and contemporary pop literature. Hannah is currently working on an edited collection entitled She-Wolf: A Cultural History of the Female Werewolf and an article on blood, sex and masculinity in 12th-century romance. As Hannah Kate, she is a published poet and reviewer, and an aspiring novelist.

Teaching A-Level Gothic Thumbnail

Teaching A-Level Gothic

Posted by Hannah Priest on July 26, 2011 in Dr Hannah Priest, Guest Blog tagged with , , ,

This post explores some of the frustrations I have had when working with pupils who are sitting a particular A-Level English Literature exam, which contains a module entitled ‘Elements of the Gothic’. It is intended to provoke discussion, but I apologise if it veers towards polemic. I should also note that it is a criticism of a syllabus – not of teaching practice and method.

What’s Wrong With Sparkly Vampires? Thumbnail

What’s Wrong With Sparkly Vampires?

Posted by Hannah Priest on July 20, 2011 in Dr Hannah Priest, Guest Blog tagged with , , ,

In my previous post on this blog, I credited Stephenie Meyer with helping to create a new sub-genre of speculative fiction: YA paranormal romance. Today, I would like to consider one of her other, somewhat more controversial, creations: the sparkly vampire. When Twilight’s Edward Cullen walks in the sunshine, his skin glitters as though covered in precious gemstones. Little about the Twilight novels evokes such a vehement response – from both readers and non-readers alike – as the vampire that sparkles. But what is it that is making vampire fans so angry?

The New Vampires?: The Rise of the Fallen Angel Thumbnail

The New Vampires?: The Rise of the Fallen Angel

Posted by Hannah Priest on July 17, 2011 in Dr Hannah Priest, Guest Blog tagged with , , , ,

Since the 2005 release of Stephenie Meyer's Twilight, the genre of young adult paranormal romance has, to put it mildly, flourished. Meyer's work is credited by some as creating (or at least cementing the creation of) a new genre – the YA dark romance. As many reviewers and critics have commented (grumbled?), vampires have become ubiquitous.