Archive of Danielle Hancock

has written 7 articles on The Gothic Imagination.

Dannie Hancock is currently writing her doctoral thesis at the University of East Anglia, looking specifically at horror podcasting and audio horror forms. When she's not doing that or writing in the third person, she can be found in a tiny Norfolk radio station, telling stories and singing songs to whoever might be listening.

“a bit like Serial”: journo-podding and the new sounds of horror Thumbnail

“a bit like Serial”: journo-podding and the new sounds of horror

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 20, 2016 in Blog, Danielle Hancock, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  Up until the advent of Serial, I had a hard time explaining my research area to people. “Podcasts”, I’d say. “Pod-what?”, they’d reply. “Podcasts, scary ones. Like Welcome to Nightvale”. “Oh. Yeah, I’ve never heard of that.” There would be an exchange of mutually apologetic smiles, I’d mutter something about it being a bit like radio, and wish I’d stuck with literature studies. Then Serial happened. An off-shoot of NPR’s vastly popular radio programme cum podcast, This American Life,  Serial followed journalist Sarah Koenig’s ongoing, true-life, investi

The Grotesque Orgasm: Gothic’s Dirtiest Trick. Thumbnail

The Grotesque Orgasm: Gothic’s Dirtiest Trick.

Posted by Danielle Hancock on June 01, 2015 in Blog, Danielle Hancock tagged with , , , , , ,

Note: This post contains sexually explicit language.   “The grotesque orgasm” is a phrase that’s been lurking in my mind for a long time - since some friends and myself admitted to getting hot under the collar during parts of Brett Easton Ellis' American Psycho, only to be bodily horrified at the next line. Simply, American Psycho constituted  some of the most bluntly provocative literature we'd ever read, with the unhappiest endings we’d ever experienced. Let me give you an example: [here imagine the antics of an explicit 2.5 page consensual three-person sex scene, build

Earbuds, Imagination and Immersion: Looking Forward to New Kinds of Terror in New Kinds of Horror Thumbnail

Earbuds, Imagination and Immersion: Looking Forward to New Kinds of Terror in New Kinds of Horror

Posted by Danielle Hancock on May 13, 2015 in Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , ,

There is one last thing that I’d like to say about horror podcasting. Horror-podcasts – those short, creepy little audio-narratives that engulf most of my free time - are often described along the lines of “movies for your ears”. I disagree. I think that horror podcasting potentializes a very different horror experience to cinematic forms. Have you ever wondered, after a scary film, if you’re as safe in your home as you thought? Have you ever flicked on all the lights, peered through the window, checked the cupboards, just to make sure? In lone horror listening, that uncertainty

Horror Podcasting and Zombie Radio – A Special Kind of Creepy Thumbnail

Horror Podcasting and Zombie Radio – A Special Kind of Creepy

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 30, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Radio is the ghost-trace behind every iTune. If video killed the radio (star), iPod was born of its remnants - taking the best and leaving the rest. iPod, that anti domestic, anti-connective, personalised sound-bubble machine, jettisoned all that made radio both homely and, (as the homely often is), cloying, intrusive, and restrictive. iPod gave not only mobility but freedom from advert breaks (or at least the option to fast-forward), time schedules, crappy songs, DJ waffle, knob-twiddling and crackling reception. We moved on from radio, our dead friend. So beneath our streamlined podcasts

Welcome Friends:  Horror Podcasting’s overthrow of the Mobile, Private iPod. Thumbnail

Welcome Friends: Horror Podcasting’s overthrow of the Mobile, Private iPod.

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 16, 2015 in Danielle Hancock tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Camp-fire tales and oral spook-tales aren’t just about sharing voices, they are also about sharing space. Faintly-lit faces in the darkness, making strange the presence of other humans, crowded around a beacon of light: a rough-shod, impermanent domestic in the wilderness, with goodness knows what watching from the shadows. There’s a thrill to be had in probing the limitations of the firelight’s safety, and in the uncertainty of one’s company; transformed by the stories and their in/visibility. The same is true of fireside ghost-tales, and Golden Era radio-horror listening: the fam

Horror Podcasting: Cyber Folktales at the Digital Campfire Thumbnail

Horror Podcasting: Cyber Folktales at the Digital Campfire

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 09, 2015 in Blog, Danielle Hancock tagged with , , , , ,

This is a blogpost about precisely what it cannot provide - a sense of sound, tone and rhythm; a lone voice to be shared with a group. So, for a moment, try to forget the page.   And listen with me.   Chords are struck on a banjo, a low voice tells a homespun tale, short but enthralling in its horror and simplicity; they assure us that this story is absolutely, one-hundred percent true, that it really happened to the teller, or his friend, or his friend’s friend; at the story’s close, those banjo notes return, alongside the invitation to tell your own creepy story, to listeners u