Archive of Chloe Buckley

has written 10 articles on The Gothic Imagination.

Chloe has an MA in literary research from Lancaster University, which explored contemporary children's fantasy and gothic fiction. She is currently completing a PhD on contemporary Gothic and critical ideas of the "child" reader, also at Lancaster.

Symposium – Helen Oyeyemi Thumbnail

Symposium – Helen Oyeyemi

Posted by Chloe Buckley on December 11, 2014 in News tagged with , , ,

Symposium on Helen Oyeyemi Teeside University, 18th February, 2015 For those of you interested in contemporary gothic, feminism, and postcolonial gothic - a Symposium on the work of British-Nigerian author, Helen Oyeyemi - author of White is for Witching, Mr Fox, The Icarus Girl, The Opposite House and Boy Snow Bird  - is being held at Teeside University, 18th February 2015. See attached poster for details and registration information. Oyeyemi is one of the most innovative and exciting writers of contemporary gothic fiction and this symposium brings together a number of leading schol

Review: Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death

Posted by Chloe Buckley on November 24, 2014 in Reviews tagged with , , , , , , ,

Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2014 ISBN-10: 0230759823 ISBN-13: 978-0230759824   Last year, I was delighted to review Chris Riddell’s Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse, winner of the 2013 Costa Children’s book award. Ghost of a Mouse eschewed the ‘hard issues’ normally associated with award-winning children’s fiction, providing a delightful and witty rewriting of classic gothic tropes. The sequel, Goth Girl and the Fete Worse than Death, published earlier this year, takes the reader even further away from serious fare, with more jo

Review: Goth Girl and the Ghost of A Mouse Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Ghost of A Mouse

Posted by Chloe Buckley on February 14, 2014 in Blog, Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , ,

Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse by Chris Riddell Publisher: Macmillan (Sep 2013) ISBN-10: 0230759807 ISBN-13: 978-0230759800 Review by Chloe Buckley Goth Girl and the Ghost of a Mouse is a beautiful and wonderfully silly book. I confess: it is one of the most enjoyable books that I have read for some time. However, beyond my immediate response as a newly converted Chris Riddell fan, I would argue that the pleasures offered by Goth Girl are timely and pertinent in terms of understanding why contemporary children’s gothic continues to flourish as a popular and literary form. The succes

Dare You? new anthology challenges notions of children’s gothic [Review] Thumbnail

Dare You? new anthology challenges notions of children’s gothic [Review]

Posted by Chloe Buckley on November 12, 2013 in News, Reviews tagged with , , , , , ,

Dare You: A Gothic Anthology by gifted young writers Edited by Charlotte Cubitt Publisher: RPA Young Publishers (Aug 2013) ISBN-10:0957698100 ISBN-13:978-0957698109 Review by Chloe Buckley Since its inception, gothic fiction has been at the heart of a debate about what is and isn’t appropriate reading material for the young. Even the earliest gothic novels were subject to plenty of criticism for exposing impressionable readers to the worst kind of vices and excess. In recent years, some of the terms in this debate have changed, but, as Dr. Catherine Spooner recently pointed

“Dark creatures are more fun” – Interview with Joseph Delaney Thumbnail

“Dark creatures are more fun” – Interview with Joseph Delaney

Posted by Chloe Buckley on November 30, 2012 in Interviews, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , ,

“Dark creatures are more fun” Interview with Joseph Delaney / Review of Slither’s Tale Slither’s Tale Publisher: Bodley Head (27 Sep 2012) ISBN-10: 0370332172 ISBN-13: 978-0370332178 Joseph Delaney is the author of the spectacularly successful dark fantasy series, The Wardstone Chronicles, written for children and young adults. The novels tell the story of Tom Ward, a farmer’s son apprenticed to the County ‘Spook’ on his twelfth birthday.  Tom and the ‘Spook’ live and work at the edge of their community, protecting the folk of ‘the County’ from supernatural thr

Sparkly Vampires: Strictly No Admittance Thumbnail

Sparkly Vampires: Strictly No Admittance

Posted by Chloe Buckley on October 31, 2012 in Interviews, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , ,

“Young Adult Gothic” at Lancaster’s Litfest 17th October, 2012 The Gothic always features prominently at Lancaster’s annual literary festival, Litfest. The week-long festival features a series of workshops, lunchtime talks, lectures, readings and panel discussions, with Gothic titles and concerns often on the agenda. In addition to the usual variety of literary delights on offer, LitFest this year has been particularly interested in children’s fiction and have commissioned the young adult novella, Malkin Child by Livi Michael, to commemorate the four hundred year anniversary of

Natalie Wilson, Seduced by Twilight and Gizelle Liza Anatol (ed.), Bringing Light to Twilight Thumbnail

Natalie Wilson, Seduced by Twilight and Gizelle Liza Anatol (ed.), Bringing Light to Twilight

Posted by Chloe Buckley on October 11, 2011 in Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , ,

Natalie Wilson, Seduced by Twilight, McFarland and Co. 2011. ISBN: 978-0786460427 Gizelle Liza Anatol (ed.), Bringing Light to Twilight, Palgrave MacMillan, 2011. ISBN: 978-0230110687 “I’m so mad you think I read Twilight.” Fright Night I sympathise with Fright Night Ed’s frustration. When I tell people I’m researching Gothic children’s literature, often they say, ‘So, stuff like Twilight, then?’ Was it out of sheer stubbornness that I resisted so long? Literary snobbery? Was it the fact that when the films came out, my ‘tween’ niece thought they were ‘sooo amazing

John Harris Dunning and Nikhil Singh, Salem Brownstone: All Along the Watchtowers Thumbnail

John Harris Dunning and Nikhil Singh, Salem Brownstone: All Along the Watchtowers

Posted by Chloe Buckley on January 06, 2011 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , ,

Salem Brownstone is a relatively lengthy graphic novel that tells the story of orphan, Salem, who, on receiving a telegram informing him of his father’s death, inherits his father’s peculiar house and possessions and is plunged into a terrifying and dangerous mystery involving uncanny circus performers, shadow creatures, dark elders from another realm, and bizarre ritual magic. Initially, the images and tone of the novel place us in a film noir-cum-art-deco inspired universe, where everything is blanched, grey, ethereal and slightly out of kilter.

Where does it end? A brief look at children’s ‘Gothic’ series fiction Thumbnail

Where does it end? A brief look at children’s ‘Gothic’ series fiction

Posted by Chloe Buckley on December 13, 2010 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

In a recent Guardian Books’ debate about whether or not J.K Rowling ought to write another Harry Potter, novelist Naomi Alderman begs the ever popular authoress: “Don’t do it.” Alderman exhorts Rowling to heed the monitory example of George Lucas: prequels, sequels, addendums and too much exposition just ruins a once well-loved yarn. My instincts tell me to go with Alderman on this one.