2018 April

A Narrative of Repression: Tracing Origin in David Ballantyne’s Sydney Bridge Upside Down Thumbnail

A Narrative of Repression: Tracing Origin in David Ballantyne’s Sydney Bridge Upside Down

Posted by Timothy Jones on April 18, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

A Narrative of Repression: Tracing Origin in David Ballantyne’s Sydney Bridge Upside Down By Edith Paton The setting is Calliope Bay, an isolated town on the edge of New Zealand with an abandoned slaughterhouse looming on the outskirts. The residents are seen only through the eyes of a troubled narrator, an adolescent killer who tries to both navigate and conceal the intentions of both himself and those around him.  By leading the reader on a labyrinthine trail through a summer of secrecy, sex and murder, Ballantyne’s narrator acts as a means of repressing the truth, obfuscating ori

CfP: Gothic Pasts, Gothic Futures Thumbnail

CfP: Gothic Pasts, Gothic Futures

Posted by Timothy Jones on April 12, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

Very excited to announce a CfP for this event at Stirling - celebrating thirty years of the Gothic Imagination programme! Call for Papers: Gothic Pasts, Gothic Futures: A Symposium Celebrating 30 Years of Gothic Studies at the University of Stirling Friday 26 October 2018, University of Stirling   Gothic Studies at the University of Stirling is celebrating its 30th anniversary. To mark the occasion, we are holding a symposium that explores the Gothic, the past and the future, as part of a programme of Gothic events in 2018-19. We live in Gothic times. The past, critic

CFP: The Fates of Frankenstein Thumbnail

CFP: The Fates of Frankenstein

Posted by Timothy Jones on April 12, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

Conference: The Fates of Frankenstein 23-24 November 2018, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh 2018 sees a flourishing crop of events commemorating, one way or another, the bicentenary of Frankenstein’s publication. The Fates of Frankenstein is a two-day conference about adaptations and appropriations of Shelley’s novel. The fate of Frankenstein and his monstrous creation has been to outlive their original context. Indeed, Frankenstein almost immediately escaped its book covers into Richard Brinsley Peake’s 1823 stage adaptation, Presumption; or, the Fate of Frankenstein. Two hund

Aaron Worth on Machen’s Gothic Transmutations Thumbnail

Aaron Worth on Machen’s Gothic Transmutations

Posted by Timothy Jones on April 11, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

Last month, I had the opportunity to speak with novelist Phil Rickman as part of his BBC Radio Wales book programme, in an episode titled ‘Can horror fiction return from the dead?’. Its theme, as the title suggests, was horror’s sudden decline in popularity after the boom of the 1980s—a grisly case of ‘genre-cide,’ as Phil put it—as well as its future prospects for revivification. After an interview with Owen King—whose collaboration with his famous father (Sleeping Beauties) was in the end summed up as ‘occasionally a bit scary...but not horror’—Phil spoke with a pair of