2017 February

CFP: Global Fantastika Thumbnail

CFP: Global Fantastika

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 21, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell tagged with ,

Fantastika Journal Call for Papers for Global Fantastika Edition “Fantastika”, coined by John Clute, is an umbrella term which incorporates the genres of fantasy, science fiction, and horror, but can also include alternative histories, steampunk, young adult fiction, or any other imaginative space. The third annual Fantastika conference focused on productions of Fantastika globally, as well as considering themes of contact across nations and borders within Fantastika. We are now seeking to supplement extended conference papers with other work in order to publish a special edition of F

Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize 2017: call for nominations Thumbnail

Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize 2017: call for nominations

Posted by Matt Foley on February 10, 2017 in News tagged with ,

The Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for Gothic Criticism 2017 Call for nominations by February 24th   In 2011, as a memorial to its founding President Dr Allan Lloyd Smith (1945-2010), the International Gothic Association established a prize to be awarded for a scholarly publication considered to have advanced the field of Gothic studies significantly. For the 2017 incarnation of the award we are delighted to announce that there will be a £100 prize for a standout monograph published on the Gothic over the last two years. For the current round of nominations, monographs published

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 05, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Women’s Gothic Fiction Gina Wisker Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-137-30348-6 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell In the introduction to her latest monograph, Gina Wisker defines contemporary women’s Gothic writing as the ‘subversive granddaughter of eighteenth-century Gothic fiction’ (Wisker 27) due to its ability to mix horror and fantasy, liberate forbidden desires, and expose repressed or hidden secrets from the past. Her study brings attention to the many essential links between feminist perspectives / critiques and contemporary women’s Gothic writi