2016 March

Oh, to furnish a house with the true scraps of the Barons’ Wars Thumbnail

Oh, to furnish a house with the true scraps of the Barons’ Wars

Posted by Peter Lindfield on March 31, 2016 in Blog, Peter Lindfield, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , ,

The collection of relics from past civilisations and places was not a new phenomenon in the 1750s when an interest in amassing and displaying medieval furniture developed. Horace Walpole (1717–97), author, collector and son of the first Prime Minster, Sir Robert Walpole, started collecting Greek and Roman antiquities whilst on the Grand Tour of the Continent in 1739. However, collecting relics from Britain and Europe’s medieval past became integral to the furnishing of Gothic interiors after the mid-eighteenth century. The character of medieval furniture and notions of authenticity were q

The Lazarus Experiment: Charles Dickens and the Rich Man’s Return Thumbnail

The Lazarus Experiment: Charles Dickens and the Rich Man’s Return

Posted by Holly Hirst on March 30, 2016 in Blog, Holly Hirst tagged with , , , , , , , ,

In my last post, I posited the importance of biblical literacy to reading the gothic, particularly 18th and 19th century works. Focusing on the two biblical figures of Lazarus, I explored the appropriation of the Lazarus of Bethany (the Lazarus resurrected by Jesus) by popular culture and its removal from its original context and framework of meaning. References to this Lazarus in gothic discourse is not an engagement with a biblical text but a context-less, and fairly arbitrary, association of this particular biblical resurrection with the vastly different gothic trope of resurrection.  It i

‘I am blameless’: The Failure of the Father in American Psycho (Part 2 of 2) Thumbnail

‘I am blameless’: The Failure of the Father in American Psycho (Part 2 of 2)

Posted by Lynsay Smith on March 29, 2016 in Blog, Lynsay Smith tagged with , ,

Whilst the role of Patrick Bateman’s mother is vital to understanding his delusional and psychotic behaviour, drug his father also contributes to his inability to establish a secure identity.  The father, troche who is mostly absent from the text, is shown to have destructive tendencies which negatively impact both of his children. In Rules of Attraction, Sean visits his father in hospital and states, ‘there was my father, already noticeably dying: his face yellowish . . . [he] had stopped drinking completely. (RoA, 266) It is apparent by this statement that Bateman’s father is an alc

The Lazarus Experiment: Two Lazaruses Thumbnail

The Lazarus Experiment: Two Lazaruses

Posted by Holly Hirst on March 25, 2016 in Blog, Holly Hirst tagged with , , , , , , ,

The British gothic, particularly in the 18th and 19th centuries, is full of biblical imagery and engagement with biblical texts. This is hardly surprising, given the context in which it was produced – that of declaredly Christian societies in which the Protestant Church continued to play an important role in both the public and private lives of the nation (whether by choice or tradition). Some writers of the gothic were assuredly not Christian believers but they lived in a society saturated by the religious imagery and thought of the Protestant church. Biblical literacy, by which I mean fami

‘There is no real me’: The Maternal Root of Patrick Bateman’s Psychosis in American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis (Part 1 of 2) Thumbnail

‘There is no real me’: The Maternal Root of Patrick Bateman’s Psychosis in American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis (Part 1 of 2)

Posted by Lynsay Smith on March 23, 2016 in Blog, Lynsay Smith tagged with , , ,

After its publication, Bret Eason Ellis’ novel, American Psycho (1991), caused controversy due to its graphic and extremely disturbing depictions of violence. Whilst it has received considerable recognition from critics, the depraved behaviour exhibited by Patrick Bateman has often been concluded as mindless aggression without an underlying psychological cause. As Catherine Spooner argues, ‘the horror of Ellis’ novel is that everything is reduced to the level of surface, there is no depth’[1] Although it is undeniable that Bateman is the personification of American consumer culture, li

CfP Deadline Day: FANTASIES OF CONTEMPORARY CULTURE Thumbnail

CfP Deadline Day: FANTASIES OF CONTEMPORARY CULTURE

Posted by Matt Foley on March 21, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , , ,

FANTASIES OF CONTEMPORARY CULTURE Cardiff University, prescription 23 May 2016 Call for Papers Keynote speakers: Dr. Mark Bould (UWE Bristol) Dr. Catherine Butler (Cardiff University) From the record-breaking sales of J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, vialis 40mg both in print and on film, cialis to the phenomenal success of various forms of hyperreal ‘reality television’, contemporary Western culture seems singularly obsessed by the spectacular and the fantastic. This desire to experience other(ed) realities is also evidenced by the continued popularity of neo-historical literat

The American Dream: A Call on Society’s Regression – a Zombie Metaphor Thumbnail

The American Dream: A Call on Society’s Regression – a Zombie Metaphor

Posted by Jenah Colledge on March 18, 2016 in Blog tagged with , , ,

We live in a world that continually strives for a better way of living: successful growth and a peaceful community in which to live and raise a family. The figure of the zombie in literature is a reminder of the, at times, seemingly illusory goal of peace. Even beyond death, the human in its zombie form wanders aimlessly, causing damage and dread. We constantly and most passionately push the idea of loving each other and the person next to us. Yet, in the midst of broken promises, the desperate fight for power, results in gluttonous behaviour, which destroys societies throughout the world

The Eye of Profane Pleasures: Fairy Tales, Pornography and the Male Gaze in Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” and “The Erl-King” (Part 3) Thumbnail

The Eye of Profane Pleasures: Fairy Tales, Pornography and the Male Gaze in Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” and “The Erl-King” (Part 3)

Posted by Elizabeth Turner on March 12, 2016 in Blog, Elizabeth Turner tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Part 3: The Erl-King: Scopophilia, Consumption and an Alternative to the Male Gaze Angela Carter’s tale of “The Erl-King” is different from her other fables, as it is not derived from a fairy tale but instead taken from Goethe’s eighteenth-century ballad, “Der Erlkönig”. The poem tells the story of a wicked elf king, who haunts the Black Forest of Germany luring children to their death. However, in true Angela Carter style, she reworks the narrative to center, not upon the ensnarement of children, but of young maidens. Like “The Bloody Chamber”, “The Erl-King” takes plac

British Library Gothic course led by Dr Emma McEvoy Thumbnail

British Library Gothic course led by Dr Emma McEvoy

Posted by Matt Foley on March 10, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , , ,

British Library Gothic course led by Dr Emma McEvoy (University of Westminster) Course dates: Tuesdays 5 April, 12 April, 19 April, 26 April and 3 May 2016 Times: 18.00–20.00 Due to its eternal appeal and strong representation within their unique literary collections, the British Library has chosen Gothic as a key subject for its new programme of courses for adult learners. 'From April 5th, Emma McEvoy, of the University of Westminster, will be teaching a five-week course on Gothic, with texts ranging from Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto to Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca.  Cen

CfP: Gothic Feminism, University of Kent, 26th-27th May Thumbnail

CfP: Gothic Feminism, University of Kent, 26th-27th May

Posted by Matt Foley on March 07, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , , , ,

  Gothic Feminism: The Representation of the Gothic Heroine in Cinema   University of Kent Thursday 26th – Friday 27th May 2016 Keynote Speaker: Dr Catherine Spooner (Lancaster University)   CALL FOR PAPERS   Since its literary beginnings, the Gothic has featured distinctive female characters who engage with, and are often central to, the uncanny narratives characteristic of the genre. The eponymous ‘Gothic heroine’ conjures up images of the imperilled young and inexperienced woman, cautiously exploring the old dark house or castle where she is physically confined by