2016 February

In the Ranks of the Menacing: An interview with Rick Hudson (Part 2) Thumbnail

In the Ranks of the Menacing: An interview with Rick Hudson (Part 2)

Posted by Catherine Wild on February 26, 2016 in Blog, Interviews tagged with

 In the Ranks of the Menacing: An interview with Rick Hudson (Part 2) Catherine Wild – University of Winchester     In the first part of this interview with the novelist and writer Rick Hudson the author discussed his often ambivalent relationship with the horror genre as a writer. In this second part, he addresses his experiences of horror and writing as an academic, and his relationship with the business of publishing.   CW: As both a writer and an academic, what are your thoughts on the study of Creative Writing at university level?   Students have told

Temporal Discombobulations: CfP Reminder and Keynotes Announced Thumbnail

Temporal Discombobulations: CfP Reminder and Keynotes Announced

Posted by Matt Foley on February 24, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with

  Temporal Discombobulations: Time and the Experience of the Gothic University of Surrey, 22-24 August 2016 Keynote speakers: Dr. Xavier Aldana Reyes, Professor Justin D Edwards, and Dr. Tracy Fahey. Our experience of the Gothic is one founded in time. Whether it is of a past that will not or cannot die, multiple presents that can never resolved, or infinite futures that can never be realised it speaks of a temporal excess that refuses to be contained. Time is one of the fundamental concepts by which we relate to ourselves, others, and the spaces we inhabit. It is at once both a

The Eye of Profane Pleasures: Fairy Tales, Pornography and the Male Gaze in Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” and “The Erl-King” (Part 1) Thumbnail

The Eye of Profane Pleasures: Fairy Tales, Pornography and the Male Gaze in Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” and “The Erl-King” (Part 1)

Posted by Elizabeth Turner on February 23, 2016 in Blog, Elizabeth Turner tagged with , , , ,

Part 1: An Introduction to Fairy Tales and Pornography My first experience reading Angela Carter was during an Introduction to Literature class, at Kutztown University. The narrative assigned was “The Loves of Lady Purple”, a tale that centered upon the life of a female marionette who, after being repeatedly debased as a prostitute, comes to life to kill her oppressive, male puppeteer. The story was only eleven pages in its entirety and yet it wielded an inexplicable power over me. I had never read anything quite like it before and I closed the book, feeling both terribly intimidated

Review: Gothic Tourism (Palgrave Gothic Series) Thumbnail

Review: Gothic Tourism (Palgrave Gothic Series)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 21, 2016 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Gothic Tourism Emma McEvoy Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-137-39128-5 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Emma McEvoy’s study of Gothic tourism opens with a personal account of her experience of a scare attraction in the form of Alton Towers’ ‘The Sanctuary’. Noting the narrative structure of the tour as well as the many visual, kinetic, and auditory effects, she presents it as an example of Gothic tourism, which according to her interpretation, is ‘the act of visiting, for the purposes of leisure, a location that is presented in terms of the Gothic’ (McEvoy 2016, 3).

FREE GOTHIC MOOC: Reminder Thumbnail

FREE GOTHIC MOOC: Reminder

Posted by Dale Townshend on February 19, 2016 in News tagged with

Remember to register before 29 February. For registration details, watch the trailer here.

Maternal Community and Paternal Abandonment in Faulkner and Morrison Thumbnail

Maternal Community and Paternal Abandonment in Faulkner and Morrison

Posted by Ann Bradley on February 18, 2016 in Ann Bradley, Blog tagged with , , , ,

If trauma is not dealt with, recognized and communicated, then it has the potential to haunt the sufferer in the form of flashbacks. Absalom, Absalom! and Beloved go a step further than flashbacks. The individuals are haunted by living manifestations of their trauma. If those ghosts are to be exorcised however, it stands to reason that they would still need to be talked through, which requires a receptive community. The people who surround Sethe and Sutpen respectively have just as much to do with the end of the novel as the ghosts do. Their reactions to the spectres and the haunted det

‘Asylums, Pathologies and the Themes of Madness’: Pictures Thumbnail

‘Asylums, Pathologies and the Themes of Madness’: Pictures

Posted by Matt Foley on February 13, 2016 in Blog, McGrath Symposium, News tagged with , , , ,

We're delighted to reproduce, here, some images from the recent symposium at University of Stirling, 'Asylums, Pathologies and the Themes of Madness: Patrick McGrath and his Gothic Contemporaries'. Many thanks to all of the delegates who attended and, in this instance in particular, to Tanja Jurkovic for her professional photography. Some of the papers from the day were recorded and these will be re-produced in a later post! The conference was generously supported by both The International Gothic Association and The Wellcome Trust.         &

In the Ranks of the Menacing: An interview with Rick Hudson (Part 1) Thumbnail

In the Ranks of the Menacing: An interview with Rick Hudson (Part 1)

Posted by Catherine Wild on February 12, 2016 in Uncategorized tagged with

In the Ranks of the Menacing: An interview with Rick Hudson (Part 1) Catherine Wild – University of Winchester   I begin to accept this, as a novelist, I belong to the ranks of the menacing.                                                                                     - Anthony Burgess   The English novelist and short story writer Rick Hudson is recognised as occupying an unusual position as a writer in that his work is located in the strange liminal territory between contemporary literatur

Beloved and Charles Bon: Excess and Absence Thumbnail

Beloved and Charles Bon: Excess and Absence

Posted by Ann Bradley on February 11, 2016 in Ann Bradley, Blog tagged with , , , ,

The horrors that William Faulkner depicts in his novel, Absalom, Absalom! are general, pointing to a the fact that the South is built by the labour and death of women and slaves. This terrible mode of construction haunts the characters of the novel. Morrison’s work illustrates this same awful truth. “Beloved pictures American history as a haunted house, from which slavery’s legacy of grief and horror cannot be exorcised. The United States, as many American Gothic texts argue, is built on economic exploitation and racial terror” (Goddu 63-64). Unlike Absalom, Beloved focuses on the trau

World Vampire Congress Thumbnail

World Vampire Congress

Posted by Dr David Annwn Jones on February 09, 2016 in Uncategorized tagged with

CALL FOR PAPERS For the World Vampire Congress 2016, part of the Bram Stoker International Film Festival. See BSIFF on Facebook for details.