2015 October

‘The Secret of Stanway’: Cynthia Asquith as Literary Networker Thumbnail

‘The Secret of Stanway’: Cynthia Asquith as Literary Networker

Posted by Matt Foley on October 31, 2015 in Blog tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

‘In every relationship I am conscious of doubling the parts of Pygmalion and Galatea; I make and I am made’ – Cynthia Asquith (1950, xiv-xv) Much of the limited scholarly literature that has read biographer, diarist, and ghost story collection editor Lady Cynthia Asquith’s contribution to early to middle twentieth-century British fiction stages her as a Galatea-esque figure: a passive recipient of roles fashioned for her by both D.H. Lawrence and J.M. Barrie. There are certainly circumstantial reasons for reading Asquith in this way. Lawrence’s desire to paint, as Asquith recoun

Robert Adam, Classical Architecture and the Gothic Revival Thumbnail

Robert Adam, Classical Architecture and the Gothic Revival

Posted by Peter Lindfield on October 26, 2015 in Blog, Peter Lindfield tagged with

This is the second of my monthly posts in connection with the AHRC-funded project, Writing Britain’s Ruins, 1700–1850: The Architectural Imagination. The project is developing apace with preparations for the MOOC on the Gothic Revival and a highly subscribed conference, Reading Architecture Across the Arts and Humanities, taking shape (87 people giving papers): more details can be found at https://stirarch.wordpress.com. The topic of this post concerns the Gothic Revival architecture of Robert Adam (1728–92), and coincides with a number of my current activities: tidying up my monog

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946) Thumbnail

And never look in to my eyes; Gothic Surrealism in La Belle et la Bête (1946)

Posted by Stephanie Gallon on October 26, 2015 in Blog, Stephanie Gallon tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The term ‘surréaliste’, or surrealist, was coined by Guillaume Apollinaire in 1917 in response to Jean Cocteau’s ballet Parade. It meant to Apollinaire ‘an attempt to reach beyond the limits of the “real”’ (Baldick, 2008: 324). In looser terms, surrealist is to describe something as imaginative but bizarre. Much of Cocteau’s 1946 film La Belle et la Bête fits in to this definition. The palace itself is an isolated and dark place, very much fitting in to the Gothic tradition. There are disembodied hands to act as servants though Belle calls them ‘invisible’. They hold t

Reimagining the Gothic Showcase and Symposium 2016 Thumbnail

Reimagining the Gothic Showcase and Symposium 2016

Posted by Matt Foley on October 26, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , , , ,

Reimagining the Gothic Showcase and Symposium 2016 Sheffield Gothic is pleased to announce its new 2016 conference and showcase event: Reimagining the Gothic: Monsters and Monstrosities.    Reimagining the Gothic is an ongoing project that seeks to explore how the Gothic can be re-read, cheap re-analysed, and re-imagined.  We encourage both public interest and new academic avenues from students and scholars who wish to present on the Gothic using interdisciplinary and creative methods. With Reimagining the Gothic: Monsters and Monstrosities we hope to reconsider notions of monstr

Reality as Dreams, Dreams as Reality: When Marnie Was There (2014) from Studio Ghibli Thumbnail

Reality as Dreams, Dreams as Reality: When Marnie Was There (2014) from Studio Ghibli

Posted by Janet Chu on October 23, 2015 in Blog, Janet Chu tagged with

   Directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi (also known as the director of The Secret World of Arrietty) and produced by Studio Ghibli, the world-leading Japanese animation studio, the animated film When Marnie Was There was released in the summer of 2014 in Japan, and in October of this year in the UK at the London Film Festival. The film, an adaptation of the 1967’s young-adult novel of the same title by the English writer Joan G. Robinson, tells the story about an isolated heroine Anna’s secret experience of encountering and befriending a mysterious girl Marnie in treating her asthma in

Review: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright Thumbnail

Review: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright

Posted by Maria Cohut on October 15, 2015 in Blog, Maria Cohurt, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright by Chris Riddell Macmillan 2015 ISBN-10: 1447277899 ISBN-13: 978-1447277897 Following the 'gift' booklet released on the occasion of World Book Day this year, Macmillan have published yet another instalment in Chris Riddell's 'Goth Girl' series: Goth Girl and the Wuthering Fright. Right in time, too, for the celebration of the Ada Lovelace Day on the 13th October (happy belated Ada Lovelace Day!), with another story about her fictional namesake, Ada Goth, 'the only child of Lord Goth, England's foremost cycling poet', also prominently featuring

Cave on Stage: Transmogrification and Connection in the Live Performance Thumbnail

Cave on Stage: Transmogrification and Connection in the Live Performance

Posted by Finn Daniels-Yeomans on October 13, 2015 in Blog, Finn Daniels-Yeomans tagged with , , , , , , ,

In his live performances Cave adopts a transgressive stage presence that encapsulates the category fluidity, viagra buy generic inconsistency and boundary crossing that is central to his musical project as a whole. The live performance is ‘transformative’, Cave states in interview; it is a situation in which he changes, mutates and becomes the various elements – characters, emotions, sensations – that make up his irrational musical world. In this, the final post in my series, I want to explore the sense in which this becoming-strange that characterises Cave’s performance persona b

Patrick McGrath Exhibition: the work begins Thumbnail

Patrick McGrath Exhibition: the work begins

Posted by Matt Foley on October 08, 2015 in Blog, McGrath Symposium, News tagged with , , , ,

Patrick McGrath Exhibition: the work begins   'Asylums, Pathologies and the Themes of Madness: Patrick McGrath and his Gothic Contemporaries', a symposium to mark the emergence of a new Patrick McGrath archive at Stirling, is to be held at the University's library on Saturday January 16th 2016. Potential speakers are encouraged to submit abstracts by next Friday 16th October. As a way of whetting the appetite for the day itself, we are delighted to share here some images of a small selection of materials from the archive (with special thanks to the photographer, Tanja Jurkov

‘More than One and not quite Two’ – Conjoined Twins in Shelley Jackson’s Half Life Thumbnail

‘More than One and not quite Two’ – Conjoined Twins in Shelley Jackson’s Half Life

Posted by Sonja Zimmermann on October 06, 2015 in Blog, Sonja Zimmermann, Uncategorized tagged with , , , ,

At first glance any major fascination with conjoined twins or, for that matter, so called Freak Shows in general, appears to be very much a ‘thing from the past’; a Victorian fascination with grotesque bodies that has no place in our modern, ‘enlightened’ society. However, if the last thirty years or so are anything to judge by, the topic is still as captivating to us as ever. Museums such as ‘Ripley’s Believe it or Not’ and the newly opened ‘Viktor Wynd Museum of Curiosities’ in London, or the ‘Mütter Museum’ in Philadelphia, amongst many others, still successfully disp

A VERY GLASWEGIAN EDGAR ALLAN Thumbnail

A VERY GLASWEGIAN EDGAR ALLAN

Posted by Matt Foley on October 04, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , , ,

21st CENTURY POE: A VERY GLASWEGIAN EDGAR ALLAN By Marty Ross "During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country; and at length found myself, as the shades of evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher."     The vast majority of Edgar Allan Poe's greatest stories share the same starting point: a troubled, disturbed narrator needs - in the most immediate, emphatic terms - to tell us the