2015 September

‘It  is just rock ‘n roll, oh but it gets right down to your soul’: Gothic and Duende in Push the Sky Away Thumbnail

‘It is just rock ‘n roll, oh but it gets right down to your soul’: Gothic and Duende in Push the Sky Away

Posted by Finn Daniels-Yeomans on September 30, 2015 in Blog, Finn Daniels-Yeomans tagged with , , , , ,

In the previous blog, I outlined the extent to which within Nick Cave’s cultural output there exists a fundamental fascination with Gothic transgression, with the overstepping and breaking down of the conventional socio-cultural boundaries that hold our worlds in shape. This impulse manifests itself not only through Cave’s creation of a world where bounded divisions have begun to crumble, but more so in his attempt to immerse his listeners into this world through the collapsing of the boundary between the music and themselves. It is here that Cave’s music might most productively be c

CFP: ‘Werewolves: Studies in Transformations’ Thumbnail

CFP: ‘Werewolves: Studies in Transformations’

Posted by Kaja Franck on September 30, 2015 in Guest Blog tagged with , , , , ,

I'm delighted to post a CFP for a special issue of Revenant, a journal dedicated to the supernatural. ‘Revenant: Critical and Creative Studies of the Supernatural’ is a peer-reviewed, online journal looking at the supernatural, the uncanny and the weird. Revenant is now accepting articles, creative writing pieces and book, film, game, event or art reviews for a themed issue on werewolves (due Autumn 2016), guest edited by Dr Janine Hatter and Kaja Franck. Werewolves have been a consistent, if side-lined, aspect of supernatural studies. From medieval and Early Modern poetry, through the

Reading Britain’s Ruins: month the first Thumbnail

Reading Britain’s Ruins: month the first

Posted by Peter Lindfield on September 30, 2015 in Uncategorized tagged with

The first month of my postdoctoral fellowship on the AHRC-funded project,  Writing Britain’s Ruins, 1700–1840: The Architectural Imagination, based at the University of Stirling has been eventful. Not only have I moved to Stirling directly following a fellowship at the Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University, but I have also joined a new, and dynamic, department (transitioning from Art History to Literature certainly represents the project’s interdisciplinary ethos). Thus far I have been developing my research outputs and making preparations for the project’s main conference: Rea

Leather Clad Heroines and the Monster Within Thumbnail

Leather Clad Heroines and the Monster Within

Posted by Tracy Hastie on September 25, 2015 in Blog, Tracy Hastie tagged with

Paranormal Romance and Urban Fantasy exist as contemporary texts within the Female Gothic tradition.  Through their representation of empowered female protagonists these texts continue to challenge patriarchal stereotypes.  There are numerous ways in which the representation of the monster, who is no longer Other, has revitalised the Gothic for a new generation.  Romantic relationships with monsters lead the protagonists to delve into the dark haunted spaces within themselves as they struggle to understand the nature of humanity.  Several interesting paradoxes become apparent: for inst

Review: The Twilight of the Gothic? Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance (Winner of the Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for best book in Gothic criticism) Thumbnail

Review: The Twilight of the Gothic? Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance (Winner of the Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for best book in Gothic criticism)

Posted by Donna Mitchell on September 25, 2015 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Twilight of the Gothic?: Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance. Joseph Crawford. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2014. ISBN: 978-1-78316-064-8 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Winner of the Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for the best book in Gothic criticism, Joseph Crawford’s The Twilight of the Gothic?: Vampire Fiction and the Rise of the Paranormal Romance traces the historical development and rise in popularity of the paranormal romance and examines the reasons behind the divisive reactions to the genre. He begins by identifying three phases in its development

CfP: Wharton and the Culture of the Monthly Magazine Thumbnail

CfP: Wharton and the Culture of the Monthly Magazine

Posted by Matt Foley on September 23, 2015 in Blog tagged with , ,

Wharton and the Culture of the Monthly Magazine; 2016 ALA Conference, May 26-29; Deadline: January 15, 2016 Edith Wharton Society contact email: paul.ohler@kpu.ca Wharton and the Culture of the Monthly Magazine Papers are sought that investigate Wharton’s engagement with the culture of the monthly magazine, including critiques of readers and reading in Wharton's work as well as contextual studies of publications in periodicals. Papers might also offer new information about Wharton’s relations with individual magazines—she published in more than twenty—an

Excess, Transgression, Immersion: Nick Cave’s Gothic Encounters Thumbnail

Excess, Transgression, Immersion: Nick Cave’s Gothic Encounters

Posted by Finn Daniels-Yeomans on September 15, 2015 in Blog, Finn Daniels-Yeomans tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

  If ‘Gothic is a writing of excess’ (Botting 1996: 1), if it is characterised by the extreme, the over-the-top, the melodramatic, then this proclivity is not simply a matter of aesthetics, but belies a more fundamental concern with the perforation of those limits that define the appropriate and the acceptable. Gothic’s stylistic excesses, as Fred Botting has argued, are the manifestation of a fascination with transgression, with the overstepping of boundaries that hold our social realities in their conventional shape. It is precisely this dynamic of limit and transgression t

CFP: Books of Blood – Funding bid and collaborative project Thumbnail

CFP: Books of Blood – Funding bid and collaborative project

Posted by Matt Foley on September 15, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with

CFP: Books of Blood: a cross-disciplinary investigation into blood as representation, symbol, and text in modern culture University of Hertfordshire contact email: s.george@herts.ac.uk All humans ‘are books of blood—wherever you open us, we’re red’ (Clive Barker). If our bodies are books of blood, then they can be read; we invite such readings and contributions where blood is the signifier. We are also interested in analyses and representation of the literal presence of blood in our culture, the importance of the actual material substance of life itself. This is the firs

Religious Fears: Fundamentalism and the Gothic Thumbnail

Religious Fears: Fundamentalism and the Gothic

Posted by Eleanor Beal on September 09, 2015 in Blog, Eleanor Beal tagged with

In my previous post, I suggested that one of the ways we may begin to explore a contemporary Gothic theology is through its intersections with post-secular literary theory. The Post-secular addresses the spiritual impulse as it appears to re-emerge from within a capitalist, postmodern, post-Christian culture. Of particular interest is the earnest pursuit and reworking of the spiritual and sacred in late twentieth and early twenty-first century fiction. My attention is focused on the Gothic modes and attributes of this contemporary fiction and with tracing, in a more general sense, the ways i

CALL FOR PAPERS: Fashion and Horror Collection Thumbnail

CALL FOR PAPERS: Fashion and Horror Collection

Posted by Matt Foley on September 01, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , , , ,

This is a call for proposals for chapters to comprise a potential new publication, which has had strong interest from Bloomsbury. Editors of this volume are Dr. Julia Petrov, salve Alberta College of Art and Design, Canada and Dr. Gudrun D. Whitehead, University of Iceland. Overview  Recently, academic attention has turned to exploring the links between popular culture and dress. Thematic approaches to sub-cultural dress have included Gothic: Dark Glamour (Steele and Park 2008), Punk: Chaos to Couture (Bolton et al 2013). The role of media in fashion dissemination and reception