2014 December

2014: A (Subjective) Year in Horror Thumbnail

2014: A (Subjective) Year in Horror

Posted by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas on December 26, 2014 in Guest Blog tagged with

This year has been an impressive one for independent horror film, and the recent release of Xavier Aldana Reyes’ already essential Body Gothic: Corporeal Transgression in Contemporary Literature and Horror Film provides the perfect excuse to indulge in a wholly subjective 2014 horror best-of list. If there has been one formal quality that unites the year’s best horror films, it is the return of colour: bright, aggressive, joyful colour. Coincidence or conscious movement, 2014 saw a number of filmmakers seemingly drunk on the legacy of Dario Argento’s 1977 masterpiece, Suspiria. This

Have Yourself a Very Scary Christmas… Thumbnail

Have Yourself a Very Scary Christmas…

Posted by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas on December 16, 2014 in Guest Blog tagged with

Growing up in Australia, my childhood memories of Christmas are dominated by a pervasive sense of heat. While I envy a climate more suited to turkey-and-pudding eating, it is the Christmas tradition of telling ghost stories that I covet most of all. While we in Australia have bewilderingly embraced the whole snow thing, this more climate-appropriate, supernaturally-themed tradition has no real legacy here today beyond the ubiquitous television reruns of Diet Dickens. It is in this spirit that I wish to share some of my favourite Christmas movies of an altogether darker nature, but blog r

Symposium – Helen Oyeyemi Thumbnail

Symposium – Helen Oyeyemi

Posted by Chloe Buckley on December 11, 2014 in News tagged with , , ,

Symposium on Helen Oyeyemi Teeside University, vcialis 40mg 18th February, there 2015 For those of you interested in contemporary gothic, feminism, and postcolonial gothic - a Symposium on the work of British-Nigerian author, Helen Oyeyemi - author of White is for Witching, Mr Fox, The Icarus Girl, The Opposite House and Boy Snow Bird  - is being held at Teeside University, 18th February 2015. See attached poster for details and registration information. Oyeyemi is one of the most innovative and exciting writers of contemporary gothic fiction and this symposium brings together a number

A Review of Xavier Aldana Reyes’ Body Gothic (2014) Thumbnail

A Review of Xavier Aldana Reyes’ Body Gothic (2014)

Posted by Rachey Taylor on December 10, 2014 in Uncategorized tagged with

Dr Xavier Aldana Reyes of Manchester Metropolitan University published his first monograph, check Body Gothic, check this year. Hopefully, order it is one of many more to come.   Having always had a fascination with the gothic body, it has been a pleasure to review a text that takes this concept and turns it on its head, providing a much-needed addition to existing scholarship on this topic. Aldana Reyes begins the text with a chapter on this very subject, pointing out the necessity to ‘reclaim the importance of the body to the gothic text’ (2). He considers man becoming fly, a

Gothic Textures in Found Footage Horror Film Thumbnail

Gothic Textures in Found Footage Horror Film

Posted by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas on December 07, 2014 in Guest Blog tagged with , , , , ,

“The Gothic”, view Philip Brophy once wrote, “is attracted to decay like maggots to a corpse”. Having released a book earlier this year on found footage horror film, there’s a romance to Brophy’s quote that I can’t resist applying to the spectacular deterioration of the video image in this popular subgenre. The aesthetics of digital decay are so integral to this category that they have become a key element of its visual signature. This category runs the budget gamut, but whether it is authentically amateur or a big studio attempt at replicating amateur filmmaking aesthetics, th

Queensland Gothic: Richard Stanley’s ‘The Island of Dr. Moreau’ Thumbnail

Queensland Gothic: Richard Stanley’s ‘The Island of Dr. Moreau’

Posted by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas on December 02, 2014 in Guest Blog tagged with , , , , , ,

When Richard Stanley's Hardware briefly hit Australian cinemas in the early 1990s, my Goth best friend was beside herself. A cameo by Fields of the Nephilim front man Carl McCoy sent her into subculturally-induced conniptions. If I recall correctly, there were even discussions about lining up for tickets to a movie that frankly would have been lucky to get twenty people on a busy night in the small Australian city where we lived. Like many of us at our high school worst, I confess I lied when I pretended I knew who McCoy was. Desperate to impress my enigmatic, black-clad friend, I mimicked h